Police Problems and Policy
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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What Kind of Thinker Are You?

What Kind of Thinker Are You? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
It matters to your team, not just to you.
Rob Duke's insight:

Excerpt:

Focus. The first step is to identify the focus of your thinking in a particular context or setting. Do you tend to pay the most attention to ideas, process, action, or relationships? For example, in the morning as you contemplate the day ahead, do you tend to think about the problems you need to solve, the plans you need to make, the actions you need to take, or the people you need to see?

This isn’t about picking one to the exclusion of the other. It’s about where your focus naturally lands. Just like when you consider watching a movie or reading a book, do you tend to go for action, romance, drama, or mystery?

Orientation. The next step is to notice whether your orientation in that setting swings toward the micro or the macro — the big picture or the details. A good way to identify this orientation is by thinking about what tends to bother you in meetings. Are you more likely to complain about getting dragged into the weeds or about things being too general and not specific enough?

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Reports: Chicago cop to be charged with murder

Reports: Chicago cop to be charged with murder | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Mayor Rahm Emanuel spoke with community leaders ahead of release and urged potential protest to be "focused."
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This Woman Looks Like The Focus Of These Photos, But Look Past Her. The Truth is Disgusting.

This Woman Looks Like The Focus Of These Photos, But Look Past Her. The Truth is Disgusting. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Photographer Haley Morris-Cafiero's photography exhibit is shocking and upsetting.
Rob Duke's insight:

Not very representative of the Department....

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Meagan Olsen's comment, December 1, 2015 3:19 AM
This photo is really sad to me. This seems very immature and is not a good look for the police departments. This one cop is making everyone else look bad, and it is really sad to see an officer (or anyone) act this way. It’s like they always tell us as athletes, we are the face of the university and everyone is always watching us so we have to be careful and aware of our actions and how people can portray the things we do. It is the same thing here, and this cop is not doing a good job representing the police force.
Maddie Davis's comment, December 8, 2015 6:23 PM
Seeing this photo makes me disappointed. I think this is extremely unprofessional and just rude. It makes those two officers look bad, as well as their department. A lot of people look up to the police and if they act immature and disrespectful like this then they’re going to start losing trust from their community. Officers need to be aware of their actions because people are always watching. This is not a good representation of their department.
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An old court case exposes the racist tricks used to ensure all-white juries

An old court case exposes the racist tricks used to ensure all-white juries | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
But 20 years later, serious doubt was cast on the prosecution’s motives when Mr Foster got his hands on the notes prosecutors kept during voir dire. The details are shocking: the lawyer had marked each black juror with a “B” and highlighted their names in green ink. He numbered them (“B#1”, “B#2”, and so on), and—most damningly—compared them and discussed which is the lesser of the evils if “it comes down to having to pick one of the black jurors”. As Steven Bright, Mr Foster’s lawyer, told the justices on Monday, this evidence amounts to “an arsenal of smoking guns”. It is, in the estimation of Justice Elena Kagan, “as clear a Batson violation as a court is ever going to see”.
Rob Duke's insight:

Excerpt: Among pretexts used for discrimination are a potential juror’s “low intelligence”, eyeglasses, marital status, age, address in a “bad part of town”, suspicious gait or propensity—no joke—to chew gum.

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Isaac Peacock's comment, November 22, 2015 11:39 PM
This is a outright and deviant use of deception. Though for the last century it has apparently been seen as a tolerated lie by judges. If the people who interpret the law for us don't even acknowledge it then we have a big problem that needs to be brought to light. To set a real precedent to be followed by the prosecutes who would continue using this type of subterfuge as if it is a tolerated way crime control.
Peter Krieger's comment, November 23, 2015 8:07 PM
This was a very interesting article to read which shed some light to me on a topic that i didn't really think existed. I personally was able to partake in a jury and hear a case this past summer, which was a very cool and intriguing scenario. I think that it helped round out my understanding of the criminal justice system when it comes to jurys as well as gave me a chance to test the facts which were presented and make a decision if the person was guilty or not. This is obviously hard to hear and read after been through that experience because it is so important to get a fair jury to ensure a fair trial.
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News from The Associated Press

News from The Associated Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Scotland Yard has settled legal claims from seven female activists who said undercover police had formed "intimate sexual relationships" with them while investigating protest movements.
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Laura Lee Smith's comment, November 20, 2015 5:18 PM
Nightmare scenario right here
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3 in Custody for California Cop Killing

3 in Custody for California Cop Killing | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Downey Police Officer Ricardo "Ricky" Galvez, 29, was shot dead as he sat in a department parking lot waiting for his shift to end Wednesday night.
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D.C. police framed man imprisoned 27 years for 1981 murder, U.S. jury finds

D.C. police framed man imprisoned 27 years for 1981 murder, U.S. jury finds | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The District is liable for compensatory damages after the verdict in the civil rights claim filed by Donald E. Gates.
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Isaac Peacock's comment, November 23, 2015 12:49 AM
DNA to the rescue. Forged confessions took so much of his life its very unfortunate. Technology double checks on bad practices until good policy can do most of the checks.
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How sharing police data can improve relationships with communities

How sharing police data can improve relationships with communities | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Panelists at an event at Harvard's Kennedy School argued that data on officer-involved shootings and body cameras could help improve citizens relationships with the police. But the technology should be used in conjunction with a larger conversation on race, class, and policing, they said.
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Laura Lee Smith's comment, November 20, 2015 5:19 PM
I agree, the more information people have the more control they feel over their own lives.
Courtney Antilla's comment, November 21, 2015 3:30 PM
I think the relationship between police and the public is just like any other relationship. Communication is key. It is easier to trust someone who is honest and open with you and therefore I feel the public could trust the police more if the police release more information. While they cannot comment on ongoing investigations, knowing more after the fact would still be helpful.
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Police-dog bites led to infection, inmate's death, autopsy says

Police-dog bites led to infection, inmate's death, autopsy says | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Gracia's mother didn't blame police Wednesday when autopsy results showed her son died of an infection from police-dog bites.

Instead, Willine Gracia pointed the finger at the Orange County Jail's medical staff, whom she said didn't believe her son when he complained of intense pain.

"He told the nurse, and I want to be specific here, 'I cannot move,'" Willine Gracia said, recalling what detectives told her during their investigation into Max Gracia's death.

The nurse didn't believe him, the tearful mother told reporters Wednesday.

"My 22-year-old son is now dead," she said. "They killed my son."

Max Gracia's death and the treatment he received while in custody are under at least two investigations — including one that led to the resignation of a nurse.
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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, November 20, 2015 6:41 PM
I really did not think that dog bite's got this bad (especially in comparison to human bites which almost always get infected); however, it is the job of the medical staff while there to help in these situations. I'm sure that they get use to people trying to abuse the system, or cause trouble, but there must have been warning signs that were ignored to let an infection get this bad.
Courtney Antilla's comment, November 21, 2015 3:52 PM
I give this mother respect for understanding it was not the police's fault. What happened to her son is horrible. it makes me wonder about the medical staff in our prison system and how often people cry wolf so to speak versus complaining of serious problems.
Maddie Davis's comment, December 8, 2015 6:45 PM
After reading this article, it’s kind of hard for me to feel empathy for the inmate. I agree that the medical staff should have done a better job and listened to him when he complained about extreme pain, but also I feel like this man brought it upon himself. He was arrested for armed robbery and he tried to drown the police dog in the lake. That itself makes me angry, he was a criminal and he should’ve known better. But I still think that the medical staff were wrong by not taking care of him because even though he is an inmate, it’s still their job to help people.
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How fear drives American politics

How fear drives American politics | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Does it seem like Washington has no new ideas? Instead of looking to build the future, it sometimes feels like the US political establishment happily retreats into fear and willful ignorance. Journalist David Rothkopf lays out a few of the major issues that US leadership is failing to address -- from cybercrime to world-shaking new tech to the reality of modern total war -- and calls for a new vision that sets fear aside.
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Laura Lee Smith's comment, November 20, 2015 5:20 PM
Exactly what I'm seeing, feed the fear and you get votes from people you are actively terrorizing.
eamoe's comment, November 22, 2015 2:14 AM
They will not be able to feed that fear for too long...humanity has too much of a curiousity for life and what is beyond where they live...the internet is serving well in being able to communicate instantly instead of gradual... For years I have said the 'younger generation' will take this world by storm and they are proving that already...I told a fellow student that he has the whole world in his hands... A few days later a 20 year old hacked the CIA Head Hancho! Now we got Anonymous going after the ISIS organization and other terrorist groups...lol...uh oh! looks like they woke Baby Bear...as I tease some...now instead of napping? ISIS just woke up the G.U.N. --- Global Underground Network! Stop giving your power away! You are the future! Peace!
William Estrin's comment, November 23, 2015 3:43 AM
I definitely believe that politicians are definitely capitalizing upon fear. Fear is our most primal emotion and as we learned from studying moral panics, fear can be quite effective in causing hasty, large scale changes. I believe that politicians intentionally create and exacerbate fear in order to push their own agendas and secure votes. I believe that 9/11 was an inside job and the Bush Administration either knew ahead of time about the attacks and intentionally failed to thwart them or they actually planned the attacks. They used it to promote their whole "war on terror" agenda and push us into Iraq to capitalize their oil and resources. I have offended those who tell me that how dare I even suggest that our government who watches over us would senselessly kill thousands of innocent people. But I don't really care, because they're ignorant, brainwashed, and need to open their eyes.
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Local police dept. asking residents to connect with social media

Local police dept. asking residents to connect with social media | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"It's a resource for us as well as an outlet," said Greenfield Police officer Daniel Sotello.
Rob Duke's insight:

I was Chief of Police here in the mid-1990's....

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Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, November 18, 2015 1:50 AM
I think it is really smart of police stations to be using social media to help them with crimes. Everyone has phones now these days that one post about someone will alert a whole city maybe. I also agree when they say this will help police connect with the younger generation, because unfortunately that is all the new generation really cares about is social media. I think as time goes on and our society shifts more towards the use of social media, it would be stupid for our justice system to use social media’s more.
Laura Lee Smith's comment, November 20, 2015 5:20 PM
FPD does this and people really like it!
Rob Duke's comment, November 20, 2015 5:25 PM
We used a beta of ZenDesk to not only connect with folks, but also track what we did with their comment/complaint/request....
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Police departments across U.S. would be 'well-advised' to learn from Baltimore unrest, report says

Police departments across U.S. would be 'well-advised' to learn from Baltimore unrest, report says | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police departments across the United States that have not experienced rioting in decades would be "well-advised" to learn from the Baltimore Police Department 's mistakes during its handling of unrest here in April, to ensure they are prepared for similar situations in their own cities, a law enforcement think tank wrote in a new review of the Baltimore department's handling of the rioting, looting and arson.
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2015

2015 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
So far this year, 110 law enforcement officers have died in the line of duty.
Rob Duke's insight:

....and sisters.

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Kelsey Therron Snell's comment, November 23, 2015 3:07 AM
Is this a dis-proportionate number comparatively to other years? Or is this a normal number for a yearly count? It would be interesting to know because this year has marked the most police-caused deaths to citizens... Coincidence? perhaps, perhaps not.
Kelsey Therron Snell's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:07 AM

Is this a dis-proportionate number comparatively to other years? Or is this a normal number for a yearly count? It would be interesting to know because this year has marked the most police-caused deaths to citizens... Coincidence? perhaps, perhaps not.

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Several protesters shot near Minneapolis police station

Several protesters shot near Minneapolis police station | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Witnesses claim gunmen were white supremacists; brother of victim of fatal police shooting that prompted ongoing protest calls for it to end
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What It's Like to Be an Undercover FBI Agent | VICE | United States

Bob Hamer spent 26 years undercover for the FBI, where he posed as a drug dealer, contract killer, pedophile, degenerate gambler, international weapons dealer, and white-collar criminal.
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Body camera helps discredit accusation against Knox deputy

Body camera helps discredit accusation against Knox deputy | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
(WBIR) A Knox County deputy's body camera helped prove his innocence after he was accused of fondling a woman during a traffic stop.  
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Police used apparently illegal wiretaps to make hundreds of arrests: (by not having the Top D.A. review warrants).

Police used apparently illegal wiretaps to make hundreds of arrests: (by not having the Top D.A. review warrants). | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Federal law bars the government from seeking court approval for a wiretap unless a top prosecutor has personally authorized the request. Congress added that restriction in the 1960s, when the FBI had secretly monitored civil rights leaders, to ensure that such intrusive surveillance would not be conducted lightly.

In Riverside County — a Los Angeles suburb whose  court and prosecutors approved almost one of every five U.S. wiretaps last year — the district attorney  turned the job of reviewing the applications over to lower-level lawyers, interviews and court records show. That practice almost certainly violated the federal wiretapping law and could jeopardize prosecutors’ ability to use the surveillance in court.
Rob Duke's insight:

Letter of the law violated, but it doesn't seem like the spirit of the law has been violated.

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Isaac Peacock's comment, November 23, 2015 12:03 AM
Delegation not violation seems to be happening here a by product of a strained justice system most likely but unfortunately it would not look good in court. It depends if the good faith laws are in effect their and if the state swings more toward due process or crime control.
Kelsey Therron Snell's comment, November 23, 2015 3:16 AM
This is a greater good issue and the debate on it will more than likely be long and terrible with both sides providing equally silly arguments mixed with valid points for concern. While the letter of the law has been violated (if you consider this to not be a part of the Patriot act of the early 2000's) then I can see cause for concern. But, in the spirit of the law and national security blah blah blah it is not a big deal. So what if the listened to you masturbate with your wife on the phone during a business trip. Get over it.
Kelsey Therron Snell's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 AM

This is a greater good issue and the debate on it will more than likely be long and terrible with both sides providing equally silly arguments mixed with valid points for concern. While the letter of the law has been violated (if you consider this to not be a part of the Patriot act of the early 2000's) then I can see cause for concern. But, in the spirit of the law and national security blah blah blah it is not a big deal. So what if the listened to you masturbate with your wife on the phone during a business trip. Get over it.

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At the site of Downey police officer's death, his family weeps

At the site of Downey police officer's death, his family weeps | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
At the spot where Downey Police Officer Ricardo Galvez was fatally gunned down, they gathered by the hundreds Thursday evening.
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Peter Krieger's comment, November 23, 2015 8:11 PM
I couldn't imagine having to go through something like this. Its hard to hear when you know how the officers are truly putting their lives on the line to protect the community. It is unfortunate that situations like this have to arise and officers who lay their lives on the line literally, have to have their lives taken in some instances.
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Mom still texts trooper after his death

Mom still texts trooper after his death | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Taylor Thyfault was hit and killed during a high-speed chase in May 2015. Since then, his mother has been texting his old phone as a way to deal with her grief.
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Meagan Olsen's comment, November 22, 2015 10:07 PM
I thought this story was sad but also really cool. The fact that his mom still texts him, even though he has passed away is so touching and breaks my heart. I did love the list that he made, and how there were things on the list that he accomplished through the process of his death. He is very brave and would have made a great trooper, he did all the things during the accident that a trooper would have done.
William Estrin's comment, November 23, 2015 3:36 AM
I read this story before and thought it was quite interesting and touching. However, I don't necessarily think that it is quite the healthiest. I can only understand this mother's horrible grief. However, I'm concerned that still texting his phone and receiving responses like that may be a bit unhealthy. As tragic as it is, death is a just a fact of life (no pun intended!). Everyone dies, some die naturally and some die prematurely. However, seeing as everyone eventually dies, we must learn to accept the fact that the person is now dead. It will certainly be extremely hard and there will likely be intense grieving, but I think this might be a little too much. I think this is perhaps unhealthily keeping her from accepting reality.
Peter Krieger's comment, November 23, 2015 8:16 PM
This was a very emotional article to read. I can't imagine having to go through something like this. To me it was cool to see the involvement of the officer after his death to help his mother still and use his death to better his service and job for everyone. It is cool to see how he was able to accomplish some of his 25 tasks, he will not be forgotten!
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Downey Police Officer Apparently Targeted in Fatal Shooting in Station Parking Lot: Investigators

Downey Police Officer Apparently Targeted in Fatal Shooting in Station Parking Lot: Investigators | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Downey police officer was apparently targeted when he was fatally shot while sitting in his personal vehicle in the station's parking lot, and investigators detained several people and continued ...
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Kelsey Therron Snell's comment, November 23, 2015 3:13 AM
Even after reading the article in its fullness I still am wary of the idea that this man was not targeted and that their was no preemptive thinking/planning behind this. I mean, there are multiple crimes committed daily, and eventually on any longitudinal timeline probability comes to 1, so eventually a cop was going to randomly a victim of a crime without it being related to him/her being a police officer. But as I said, I am wary of the idea that it was random.
Kelsey Therron Snell's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:13 AM

Even after reading the article in its fullness I still am wary of the idea that this man was not targeted and that their was no preemptive thinking/planning behind this. I mean, there are multiple crimes committed daily, and eventually on any longitudinal timeline probability comes to 1, so eventually a cop was going to randomly a victim of a crime without it being related to him/her being a police officer. But as I said, I am wary of the idea that it was random.

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Suspected architect of Paris attacks is dead, 2 senior European officials say

Suspected architect of Paris attacks is dead, 2 senior European officials say | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
French police raided a suburban apartment building during a 7-hour siege in which 2 people were killed.
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eamoe's comment, November 22, 2015 2:07 AM
I am glad to see Anonymous take charge in the internet search for those who contribute to this 'madness' of terrorism...they will probably reveal many of thousands of peoples and countries who finance this type of 'income' of terrorism that drives up the price of guns and stocks...
Jay Fulk's comment, November 22, 2015 8:08 PM
I'm sure that this guy was not the mastermind, but just the muscle on the ground. I'm sure there is someone out there higher up that is the true mastermind behind the Paris attacks. Fighting terror is such a difficult task but it is a task the world needs to stand together and fight against. I don't understand why NATO doesn't simply declare war on ISIS right now. Isn't that the actual reason NATO was developed, to protect the world from such danger as ISIS presents?
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Winston-Salem police officer pleads guilty in deadly crash case

Winston-Salem police officer pleads guilty in deadly crash case | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Winston-Salem police officer has pleaded guilty following a crash involving his patrol car that killed a man in May.
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Brittney Menzel's comment, November 20, 2015 3:00 AM
Wow. This is awful. It is sad that life is taken in this way. What happened to the value of life? It seems to have decreased so much that it would seem society had a lack of care for the future of the world.
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What Is Disruptive Innovation?

What Is Disruptive Innovation? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Twenty years after the introduction of the theory, we revisit what it does—and doesn’t—explain.
Rob Duke's insight:

Can we use the idea of disruptive innovation in policing?  What can we do to interrupt the business model of those who oppose the law and civil society?

 

Adapting information systems and other technology has been a major disruption for bad guys, but they also have learned to use technology to commit crimes.  We also find that technology is used to complain about police actions, but we seem not to have found effective ways to respond to that disruption.....

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NYPD’s new phones will be an 'on the go' crime lab

The phones, which will be linked directly to the mainframe computers at One Police Plaza, will allow NYPD brass to share important breaking information with more than 35,000 cops with the push of a button, getting out details of events as they unfold at home and abroad, authorities said.

“They will be incredibly helpful with things like being able to get a photo of a possible terror suspect to the entire department,” said a rep for Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance Jr.’s office, which paid for the new devices.
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Brittney Menzel's comment, November 20, 2015 2:58 AM
Can't leave well enough alone, eh? It seems like everything is changing and becoming more electronic and web based. This has and will continue to have it's own set of issues.
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No jail time for teen who killed Const. Garrett Styles

No jail time for teen who killed Const. Garrett Styles | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A young man who ended up a quadriplegic when he drove and killed York Regional Police Const. Garrett Styles is already suffering in his own prison and so will not go to jail, a judge ruled Monday.
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Meagan Olsen's comment, November 22, 2015 11:42 PM
I’m not sure if I agree with what happened in this article. I don’t think it is fair that this boy didn’t have any kind of punishment for killing an officer. It doesn’t matter if he meant to or not, the fact that he is basically not going to jail because of the fact that he is handicap is a tough ethical decision to make. I am not sure if it is okay that the reason he didn’t go to prison is because the judge thought he was already inprisionated in his own body by being in a wheel chair all his life. Lots of people are in wheel chairs but they don’t kill anyone.
Dana Hoffman's comment, November 24, 2015 9:00 AM
I too am going to agree with you on this same insight on this article. I understand that a childs brain doesnt fully develop until they reach the age of 24 years, however the judges decisions and why are just ridiculous. He has basically set the stage for anyone who is in a wheelchair might be able to commit this same crime with no consequences.