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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Police impersonator robs at gunpoint | WPRI.com

Police impersonator robs at gunpoint | WPRI.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A man posing as a police officer robbed a Providence man at gunpoint Sunday, police said.
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Oakland City Council: Hundreds testify vs. stop-and-frisk Bratton - Workers World

Oakland City Council: Hundreds testify vs. stop-and-frisk Bratton
Workers World
Over 600 Oakland activists packed the City Council chambers, the balconies and four overflow rooms on Jan. 22.
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Garry McCarthy Edges Back to Old Policing Tactics - The 312 ...

Garry McCarthy Edges Back to Old Policing Tactics - The 312 ... | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The reassignment of desk cops to patrol includes a strengthening of “saturation units,” a compromise strategy between the CPD's old, controversial gang-strike units and McCarthy's philosophy of community policing.
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Willow Weir's comment, February 7, 2013 4:06 PM
It seems a situation where nothing is working effectively and just trying anything.
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Testilying: Cops Are Liars Who Get Away with Perjury | VICE

Testilying: Cops Are Liars Who Get Away with Perjury | VICE | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Misrepresentation, deception, and outright lying appear to be part of a police officer’s job description, so much so that the term “testilying,” now common vernacular for police falsifications, was ac…...
Rob Duke's insight:

If the author's going to tell this story, he should tell the whole story...  In Brady vs. Maryland, the court ruled that all evidence that may help the suspect must be shared with the defense and subsequent courts have ruled that this means police departments must share personnel file information with the prosecution for any officer suspected of dishonesty.  This information must be shared with the defense.  In the West, where I served my career, we have a saying similar to "testily" but ours is "you lie: you die".  Does ours mean really that you die?  No, just as "testily" doesn't really mean that every cop lies in court; "you lie: you die" means that if we catch you in a lie that is substantial ("No honey, those jeans don't make you look fat." isn't a lie that we would consider substantial), then you WILL be fired.

We may be looking at an aberant police culture in NYPD.  Since I am unfamiliar with this agency, I can't really assess this possibility.  But, I can say that it is much more balanced than the author presents in many other places.  Do officers lie? Yes.  Do Chiefs routinely fire officers who lie? Yes.  Do we catch all liars? No.

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Diana Dillard's comment, February 6, 2013 5:49 PM
Officers that do commit perjury should be held accountable, just as any one should. There is a problem with the system when people's lives can be dragged through the coals on false testimonies. And it does happen, not just with police officers. I know a man that was falsely accused of rape, which came out very clearly in court. That didn't stop him from having to pay is parents life savings for a defense. And the person caught in lie after lie under testimony suffered no consequences.
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Why Police Officers Lie Under Oath

Why Police Officers Lie Under Oath | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Perversely, the criminal justice system gives officers an incentive to perjure themselves.
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Michelle Alexander has an excellent book in the "New Jim Crow".  I'm not sure that we have the data to back up the claims she makes in this article (e.g. that cops routinely lie), but there's significant reform needed none-the-less.

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Jenna Alatalo's comment, February 3, 2013 9:58 PM
In this article, Michelle Alexander quotes one of her colleagues as saying, “Everyone knows you have to be crazy to accuse the police of lying.” I can see this as being a valid statement, especially when you may be subjected to racial profiling not only by the system but the jury as well, you’ve been charged with trespassing or drug possession, etc. Even more so when the police officer is a prominent member of the force and has been for years. However, when the issue of quotas come in to play, that is where the problem probably happens the most and this is another topic we’ve debated on the discussion board (either here or in another class, I can’t remember). Quotas are important to maintain that officers are doing their job, but when they begin lying under oath to ensure that their quotas are met, there is a very unfair process going on. And it’s sad but true—“police know that no one cares about these people”, especially when they are young, uneducated minorities. I think that there needs to be a better checks and balances system put into place to make sure that our system isn’t cheating the lower man on the totem pole, but I’m not even sure where to start with that because like it was stated in the article—when you are poor and have a drug charge against you, who do you really have on your side?
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Slate: The case for torture - Mcalester News Capital

Slate: The case for torture - Mcalester News Capital | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Slate: The case for torture
Mcalester News Capital
WASHINGTON — Did "enhanced interrogation techniques" help us find Osama Bin Laden and destroy al Qaida? Were they torture? Were they wrong?
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Diana Dillard's comment, February 6, 2013 5:57 PM
Fascinating subject. What grabbed my attention here is that the detainees are referred to as the "library". It is a lot easier to torture a book than a human being. And we all know what can happen when we dehumanize prisoners and enemies.
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Watsonville police, school engage parents at workshops on social issues - Santa Cruz Sentinel

Watsonville police, school engage parents at workshops on social issues - Santa Cruz Sentinel | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Watsonville police, school engage parents at workshops on social issues
Santa Cruz Sentinel
We want them to have confidence in each other," said police Lt. Jorge Zamora.
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Miners' strike: senior officer was 'appalled' at conduct of other police

Miners' strike: senior officer was 'appalled' at conduct of other police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Letter to Labour MP increases pressure for inquiry into how picketing was handled during the 1980s dispute (RT @TimNewburn: RT @ConstableChaos: Miners' strike: senior officer was 'appalled' at conduct of other police
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Inmates At Private Prison Forced To Defecate In Plastic Bags

Inmates At Private Prison Forced To Defecate In Plastic Bags | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
When a private prison corporation paid Ohio $72.7 million in 2011 to purchase one of the state's facilities, the company touted the deal as a "groundbreaking" move that would serve as a model for other states looking to cut costs.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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Jenna Alatalo's comment, February 3, 2013 9:51 PM
After reading this article, my first question was how they determine which prisoners are sent to this ‘private’ prison in Ohio? And my second question was how many other facilities like this one are operating with the same types of violations? Obviously our economy isn’t the best it could be right now, but the fact that inmates are not being provided the basic needs for living is a little scary. Some people might argue that they are inmates—whatever they are handed they should be grateful and lucky, especially if they have committed a horrendous crime. However, the fact that staffing is low, more staffing cannot be put on due to cost….also raises the question of how safe the public is with these inmates being held here? If the money is so low that staffing needs are not met, who is to say that escapes, smuggling, etc. aren’t going on? In the article, it was mentioned that they had nearly 230 calls of attempts to smuggle drugs and alcohol into the facility. If this number is so large, what else is going on that the staff does not have control over?

Cutting costs is important but when you are cutting quality as well, that is where the problems slip in.
Riley Jewkes-Leonard's comment, February 4, 2013 9:58 PM
This is fairly upsetting. I believe that humans should have basic rights and be treated humanely regardless of if they are in prison. I think the main problem is the overcrowding of jails which leads to the privitization of the prison system. Which to me seems strange that we contract companies to run federal facilities. State and federal correctional system could avoid inccidences such as this one if we reformed some of the harsher drug laws and focused on restorive and rehabilitative justice programs.
brian mcdermott's comment, February 5, 2013 2:07 PM
It is a fact that correctional officers who work and were trained by the state manage a better facility. Those who work under the corporate umbrella are not trained as well and the employee turnover is so much higher. The duties and scope of correctional staff is to protect the public from convicted offender serving time, protecting the health and welfare of staff and inmate, and of course security of the facility. Cruel and unusual punishment behind prison walls is nothing new, and the 8th amendment is to ensure that doesn't happen. The quickest way to lose control is to deprive the majority of basic sustenance and healthcare needs.
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Automated License Plate Reader plays key role for Redlands Police Department - San Bernardino Sun

Automated License Plate Reader plays key role for Redlands Police Department - San Bernardino Sun | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Automated License Plate Reader plays key role for Redlands Police Department
San Bernardino Sun
Retired Redlands Police Lt. Russ Dalzell demonstrates the Automated License Plate reader on Wednesday at the Redlands Police Annex.
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This is my old department and Russ Dalzell was my Sergeant for a year or two ...

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Koty Emery's comment, February 2, 2013 8:31 PM
Very cool! I was wondering when new technology would be embraced by police departments. This looks like a great advancement in helping to cut down the amount of stolen vehicles. At first it seems a bit scary to think that the department is building a database that will build a record of where cars have been and at what time. Although I believe that if this technology becomes more widespread, it will be able to help map crime sprees and track down criminals if they try to flee to a different city.
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Racial Profiling is always wrong « Dr Ko Ko Gyi's Blog

Racial Profiling is always wrong « Dr Ko Ko Gyi's Blog | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Racial Profiling is wrong. I earn like “Chinese“, failed to save as “Indian“, I never waste but is somewhat “spendthrift” like a Bama”on my family, never rude like a “Chinese”, never wicket like an “Indian” but tried to be more ...
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'Zero Dark Thirty' Debate: Torture Has No Place in a Civilized Society - ABC News (blog)

'Zero Dark Thirty' Debate: Torture Has No Place in a Civilized Society - ABC News (blog) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
ABC News (blog)
'Zero Dark Thirty' Debate: Torture Has No Place in a Civilized Society
ABC News (blog)
Torture has no place in a civilized society.
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Police called to U of C hospital protest - Chicago Sun-Times

Police called to U of C hospital protest - Chicago Sun-Times | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police called to U of C hospital protest Chicago Sun-Times Police were called on Sunday to a protest at the University of Chicago Hospitals that was being held by a group who said they would not leave the Hyde Park medical center until the...
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Police say Baltimore fans mostly 'behaving themselves' as they celebrate ... - Fox News

Police say Baltimore fans mostly 'behaving themselves' as they celebrate ... - Fox News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
News Tribe
Police say Baltimore fans mostly 'behaving themselves' as they celebrate ...
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Albert Svensson's comment, February 6, 2013 10:36 AM
I love sports and understand why people get so carried away with sadness when their team losses. This year it seemed like everyone was under control and the Baltimore police could handle all the happy fans. Sports are like nothing else it makes people crazy. This years celebration went well but this article makes me think back in the years past about when a team fans the winning teams fans get out off control. Why does celebration always turn into destruction when it comes to big sporting events like the Super Bowl? The fans go wild in the streets break windows and flipping cars it would be more understand able if it was the losing team that got carried away. I guess this is question that won't be answered anytime soon people will just have to figure that out on there own.
Christopher Bedel's comment, February 7, 2013 7:07 PM
I myself am a football fanatic. I love my team, I paint my face, I jump and cheer even when watching a game at home. I was happy to see that things went well in Baltimore after their victory over the SF 49ers. I think for fans to celebrate, have fun, and cheer is a great thing to do. Fortunately, for Baltimore fans it was not like in June of 2010 when the LA Lakers won the NBA title and riots broke out despite warnings from the Mayor of that town. He told them to behave and not cause trouble. Maybe it’s the difference between fans of football verses the fans of basketball. I would like to think not, and fan conduct should be civil on all levels.
Paris Cooper's comment, February 7, 2013 10:15 PM
Crowd mentality is a very interesting thing to examine. To me we un-evolve when it comes to crowds.We look for a leader to turn to and depending on how the leader acts depends on how we respond. Now I am not particularly a sports fan, but I have been to a few basketball games where the crowd is going wild and there is screaming and chanting, and I just couldnt help myself and I had to participate. Now this article says that Raven fans are behaving themselves, maybe because this was an expected win? Just hearing everyone talk before the Superbowl everyone expected the Ravens to win. Now I wonder how bad the crowd mentality would have been if the 49ers would have won. They were the underdog so their fans would have been even more excited than the Ravens. The human brain is so complex but sometimes we revert back to our primate ways when we are thrown into crowds.
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Rob Duke's insight:

I heard one time that a great general was great not because he was a great warrior, but because he was a simple craftsman at heart.  Similarly, I think that the great cops are not great because they are warriors, but because at heart they are farmers.  Like Andy Taylor, a fictional cop that many good cops immitate, sometimes a farmer must be tough, but always with the mind that he or she is taking care of the earth, nurturing the community, and leaving it better than we found it.

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Police Taser Man Armed With Knives Outside Buckingham Palace

Police Taser Man Armed With Knives Outside Buckingham Palace | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
LONDON — Police used a stun gun to arrest a man armed with knives outside Buckingham Palace on Sunday, as throngs of tourists gathered to watch the Changing of the Guard ceremony there.
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Albert Svensson's comment, February 6, 2013 10:47 AM
I have no problem with this story I feel like this a perfect situation were the use of a stun gun is 100% effective and safe for everyone in the area. I would rather see the police stun gun a man then pull a gun on him especially with so many innocent people around. If the man did try to make a move for his knife and try to hurt someone firing a weapon might make the situation worse since it would frighten all the people. The stun gun is quite and there is no risk of hitting a random person. I feel like the situation was handled correctly from what I read in the article.
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Why Some Civil War Soldiers Glowed in the Dark

Why Some Civil War Soldiers Glowed in the Dark | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
By the spring of 1862, a year into the American Civil War, Major General Ulysses S. Grant had pushed deep into Confederate territory along the Tennessee River.
Rob Duke's insight:

I posted this just because I thought it was fascinating that a glowing microorganism may have saved some soldiers' lives during the civil war...

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Riley Jewkes-Leonard's comment, February 4, 2013 9:54 PM
This article was very interesting thank you for posting. I would have assumed that the glowing would have been a positive and a negative given that enemies could see the wounded better at night. I find the sybiosis of our world to be incredible. Who would have thought parasitic worm vomit would in turn save humans lifes.
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The next supermodel

The next supermodel | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
SMALLISH countries are often in the vanguard when it comes to reforming government. In the 1980s Britain was out in the lead, thanks to Thatcherism and...
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Rob Duke's curator insight, February 2, 2013 9:17 PM

In Crime and Delinquency, the nordic model is much better than ours.  See the work of Nils Christie, for one, who argues that the verticle justice system has a vested interest in maintaining a monopoly over all forms of conflict resolution (particularly crime) in large part because there's a tremendous amount of financial incentive to capture ownership of this sector of the economy.  The end result of a verticle system is that we have less legitimacy, less buy in from parties, and this means that there's little resolution actually realized.  Suspects resent the system that results in so much inequality.  Victims feel like suspects are part of a system that seems to reward parasites of all sorts.

Kevin May's comment, February 2, 2013 10:25 PM
That is truly an awesome insight on how to balance the competing left and right. I have been a fan of how Nordic countries have handled the rising issues of society head on. Pretty cool things to note is that regardless of the massive party system you find in those areas, they can actually get stuff done. It would be nice to see some of these methods applied over in America, but I will not hold my breath until we have a massive Public Sector collapse.
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Police oversight body has no business in officers' recruitment - Daily Nation

Police oversight body has no business in officers' recruitment - Daily Nation | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police oversight body has no business in officers' recruitment
Daily Nation
The Independent Police Oversight Authority has also objected to the appointment of Ndegwa Muhoro as the director of CID on alleged integrity issues.
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Somali 'rape victim' and reporter face trial

Somali 'rape victim' and reporter face trial | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Woman allegedly raped by government troops and journalist who interviewed her charged with insulting state institutions.
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Jenna Alatalo's comment, February 3, 2013 9:38 PM
This is awful and another reason why I say that culture really affects "human rights". In America, the gentlemen facing the rape allegations could very well be removed from their prestigious positions and held accountable for their actions and in another part of the world such as Somalia, the woman is in essence blamed for even bringing forth the allegations. This gives way into a whole other area regarding corruption and the fact that these Somali security forces who are supposed to be protecting people are actually causing the hurt and then able to reprimand the woman for telling the truth. Of course, I don't know both sides, but the mere fact that a rape by officials is being turned around the woman being blamed is just another perfect example that just because we are human does not mean that we all have the same rights and ability to live freely. Ugh.
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FBI is increasing pressure on suspects in Stuxnet inquiry

FBI is increasing pressure on suspects in Stuxnet inquiry | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
New software gives FBI a potent tool in its search for who leaked classified intel about computer virus.

Via Bob Boynton
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Former LA Police Officer Mike Ruppert Confronts CIA Director John Deutch on Drug Trafficking

On November 15, 1996, there was a town meeting in Los Angeles on allegations of CIA involvement in drug trafficking. Former Los Angeles Police Narcotics Dete...

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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Randy L. Dixon Rivera's curator insight, February 2, 2013 3:30 PM

Former LA Police Officer Mike Ruppert Confronts CIA Director John Deutch...: http://youtu.be/UT5MY3C86bk via @youtube #OATH not #NDAA

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Realignment's effect should be revealed - Fresno Bee

Realignment's effect should be revealed
Fresno Bee
Gov.
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SFPD can't stop and frisk, so they turn to 'hunting' and 'wolf packing' - San Francisco Bay View

SFPD can't stop and frisk, so they turn to 'hunting' and 'wolf packing'
San Francisco Bay View
The city of San Francisco, once a home to counterculture and folks who were free spirited, has changed for the worse over the past five to 10 years.
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Diana Dillard's comment, February 6, 2013 6:16 PM
Unfortunately we can't see what lead up to this contact, but regardless the use of excessive force seems pretty obvious. Also striking is the complete disconnect between the citizens and the officers. There was no community policing happening in San Fran!
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Obama: Gun control advocates must respect rural hunting culture ...

Obama: Gun control advocates must respect rural hunting culture ... | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Gun control advocates need to do “more listening” to rural Americans, Barack Obama has said in an interview during which he acknowledged going on shoots with guests at Camp David. In an New Republic article published ...
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Christopher Bedel's comment, February 7, 2013 7:39 PM
The great gun debate is a never ending conversation depending on your side. I am pro-gun and carry a side arm regularly. I think that there is no 100% answer to keep guns out of the hands of criminals or people who want to shoot up a school. I hated hearing about the sandy school shooting but the shooter didn’t use a assault rifle but there the biggest thing under attack. I think the NRA and congress need to sit down and talk about this more rather than just making a bunch of presidential orders and one person trying to just fix it all.
Brandon Barnes's comment, February 8, 2013 9:15 AM
I have been searching on the subject and constently cannot find the meaning of the "assualt weapons" that are hoped to be banned by gun control advocates. I do not know if they are going to go by the old ban rules or if they are going to try and get rid of anything that is similar to an assualt weapon, I know that soem of the differences in the last ban were as little as a flash suppressor making it an asuualt weapon. Through all the news I've been hearing and reading I still haven't found a good description on what they are trying to ban. I myself being a pro-gun person am now under the dilemma of whether or not I should get my ideal assualt rifle now before the ban even goes to the vote to ensure that I have it. Because I own guns but do not have a assualt fifle because that was near the last on my list do to the practicality of it. I hope that the politicians and gun control advocates do more "listening" then just the rural gun argument. When I talk to gun control advocates on many occasions I feel that many of them lack an understanding of what owning a gun means, if proper safety measures are taken of course and the owner knows how to properly use the weapon. Maybe the fact that so many people have little to no experience with violence. Something I would be interested in finding out is the amount of violent crime victims that carry now or wish they carried a gun (as in if they live in CA it is basically impossible to carry a gun legally).