Police Problems and Policy
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Judges need more feedback on their work, new research concludes

Judges need more feedback on their work, new research concludes | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Bristol University’s recommendations welcomed by the President

Via Jacqui Gilliatt
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Jay Fulk's comment, October 7, 2015 1:34 PM
I think that this is a very good idea. I feel like for every profession to excel in their field, they should have constant feedback on their performance. A judge is no different, they are people with the task of making extremely difficult decisions on their own. I couldn't imagine being a judge in a family court and never knowing how I was doing, or how people perceived I was doing. I'm all for this!
Orion Hutchin's comment, October 7, 2015 10:07 PM
I would agree with you Jay. Although Duke provides make a good point, this is a club of lawyers basically. There probably has to be some form of loyalty their like any other group situation.
Jay Fulk's comment, October 8, 2015 3:25 PM
Yes, the loyalty will more than likely always be a factor for sure.
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CHP Settles Lawsuit Over Claims of Racial Profiling

CHP Settles Lawsuit Over Claims of Racial Profiling | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO — The California Highway Patrol has agreed to end traffic stops based solely on hunches, extend a ban on searches of vehicles without probable cause and monitor whether black and Latino motorists are more likely than others to be pulled over, the agency announced Thursday.

In a class-action settlement submitted to a federal judge Thursday, the state's highway police became the nation's first law enforcement agency to voluntarily agree to stop asking motorists for permission to search their vehicles, according to the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California. The CHP will continue to search vehicles in cases where it has good reason to suspect a crime.

The settlement ended a 1999 lawsuit filed by the ACLU on behalf of three minority motorists who said their cars were stopped and searched based upon their ethnicity, a practice known as racial profiling. Data obtained by ACLU lawyers found that Latino drivers were three times as likely as others to be stopped and searched by the CHP and African Americans were 1.5 times as likely.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's the article where CHP agreed to collect data (over a decade ago)....

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Assembling IKEA furniture can be hard for robots as well as humans. - Quartz

Assembling IKEA furniture can be hard for robots as well as humans. - Quartz | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
IKEA furniture always seems so great, in theory. It's cheap, and surely it can't be that hard to put together a Vittsjö or a Nornäs, you think—until you've schlepped it home, opened up the packaging and found that even an advanced degree in structural engineering won't help you get that new coffee table up any time soon. It seems...

Via SustainOurEarth
Rob Duke's insight:

For our discussion in the face-to-face class meeting.  #insidejoke.

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Gord Lee's curator insight, October 14, 2015 8:20 AM

         This is proof of the future to come, no machine will be able to do everything, someone will always be there to maintain and adjust the machines of the future. This is a reality a lot of assembly line workers have had to face over the last decade or so, the installation of flex lines at GM has decreased the expense of reconstruction of the assembly lines every time there is a design change. Now they need just a few general labourers and technicians to switch the cable assemblies around, install the new parameters into the PLC program and run the line again. This is happening all over the manufacturing industry and has people without the technical skills to adapt to the changing world scrambling to learn the necessary skills to survive in this fast changing world. The fundamentals of renewable energy will give us a step up on a lot of people that will follow the wave of change in renewables.    

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Racial profiling bills draw praise from activists, criticism from police

Racial profiling bills draw praise from activists, criticism from police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The decision by Gov. Jerry Brown  to approve a new data collection requirement to identify and eliminate racial profiling was hailed by civil rights activists Saturday, but law enforcement officials questioned the value of such reporting.
Rob Duke's insight:

Officers have been gathering data voluntarily for almost a decade now.  We started at about the same time as the California Highway Patrol (CHP is both highway patrol and state police like the troopers) collecting racial profiling data voluntarily (CHP did so because of a case settlement, see below).  I think that was about 2004, so this seems to be much ado about nothing.

http://articles.latimes.com/2003/feb/28/local/me-search28

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Police watchdog calls for Taser guidance after inquest into fire death

Police watchdog calls for Taser guidance after inquest into fire death | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
IPCC recommends that officers be given more comprehensive guidance about use of stun guns in the presence of flammable liquids The police watchdog has called for more guidance to be given to officers in the use of Tasers after an inquest jury said...

Via steve batchelder
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Racial Profiling Rampant in Berkeley Police Department: Report

Racial Profiling Rampant in Berkeley Police Department: Report | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A group of Bay Area lawyers on Tuesday came out with harsh accusations against the Berkeley Police Department.
Rob Duke's insight:

Hmmm...I always viewed them as being very p.c.  

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Graffiti Artist Tests the Patience of Local Authorities with this Hilarious Experiment

Graffiti Artist Tests the Patience of Local Authorities with this Hilarious Experiment | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An anonymous graffiti artist decided to test the patience of the local council over a small brick building he passed every day on the way to work.
Rob Duke's insight:

Lol.  It's kind of like policing on the street.

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Meagan Olsen's comment, September 30, 2015 3:51 AM
I really love this article and the fact that the whole thing is shown with pictures and it's a conversation between the graffiti artist and the authorities even though it is just with paint. I thought it was overall really powerful and a little comical.
Courtney Antilla's comment, October 4, 2015 4:12 PM
I had seen this before and I think it's great. To me, it shows authorities know how to have some fun with their job in a harmless way. It is nice to see something that does not result in people losing their jobs or their lives. It is refreshing.
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Use of snitch backfires on Walton Co. drug investigators

Use of snitch backfires on Walton Co. drug investigators | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
At the behest of deputies, a local man — who was acting as an informant — went to Jones, tried to trade drugs for sex and, when she declined, then asked her for a ride, Boyle said.

He left the drugs in the console of Jones’ car so that deputies would have a reason to arrest her, Boyle said.

Chapman denies those charges. There were, however, problems with the arrest and with deputies giving an informant drugs and agreeing that he could use them to trade for sex, the sheriff said. Officials said the operation went wrong when the drug unit, listening in on the conversation via a wire worn by the informant, pulled over Jones, searched her car and made the arrest, even though she had said no several times to the informant’s offer.

“I’m going to sign a big check for her,” said Chapman, predicting that Jones will file a lawsuit against his office on the basis that deputies violated her civil rights.
Rob Duke's insight:

Big check indeed....

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Study says typical whistleblower isn’t disgruntled ex-employee

Study says typical whistleblower isn’t disgruntled ex-employee | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Typical whistleblower is not disgruntled ex-employee with ax to grind but top employee who wants good way to speak up, says new report

Via @MikeKenealy
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eamoe's comment, September 28, 2015 1:37 AM
I cannot for the life of me understand what the problem is within a place one works - that to point out 'what is wrong and what is lacking' would escalate to the point of a whistle blower status except for the fears of reprisal...of which we have seen are given merit in a few cases where a whistleblower suffered 'blowback' from telling what was wrong and what was lacking? And no usually those reporting these incidents want to keep their job..it is kind of like telling a supervisor the light is blinking...they nod...you tell a manager the light does not work anymore...they nod... you tell the director the right side of the building is not working and they say they will 'look into it'...after the building burns down one has to entertain the thought of if the first report was dealt with then the rest would have not occurred...and how much money did that cost...compare...
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Former Starke County sheriff sentenced for Invasion of Privacy

Former Starke County sheriff sentenced for Invasion of Privacy | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A former Starke County sheriff was sentenced for Invasion of Privacy on Wednesday.
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Rob Duke's comment, September 26, 2015 3:19 AM
Yeah, the prosecutor can throw on any charge at the Plea stage to get the penalty that they are looking for (lessor and included offenses, etc.), so the facts might not support the charge, but if everyone waives rights and agrees (such as in the case where the officer might need a misdemeanor so that he/she can keep their job), they might agree to a charge which they did not actually commit. Weird huh?
eamoe's comment, September 28, 2015 1:30 AM
Britney - I was thinking the same thing...invasion of privacy brings to mind the ordeal at Wasilla PD where some personnel - cough - was being nosy about other personnel files and was like a dog with a bone - destined to discover those that worked in the PD had something to hide...it seems those that accuse are the ones that are invading privacy...
eamoe's comment, September 28, 2015 1:31 AM
So far as this incident goes I would think that abuse of power is more like what was happening and violation of domestic violence restraining order...not invasion of privacy.
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Winston-Salem City Manager Changes Police Vehicle Policy After Spike in Accidents

Winston-Salem City Manager Changes Police Vehicle Policy After Spike in Accidents | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A recent string of accidents involving Winston-Salem police now has city leaders making immediate changes to police department policies.
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Meagan Olsen's comment, September 30, 2015 4:22 AM
I like that they are addressing the problem of the accidents that happen when officers are called to duty. I think it is a good idea to track and investigate all incidents when the police go over 70mph, I think this is fair and is a good check on the police to make sure they are doing their job and not abusing power.
Brittney Menzel's comment, October 4, 2015 3:39 AM
I find it a little strange that this even needs to be done. The article makes it sound like there are a few of the 500 officers that enjoy the fact that they are driving a police car a little too much. But, since it is an issue, I am also relieved it is being addressed.
Brittney Menzel's curator insight, October 4, 2015 3:41 AM

Maybe the police need annual driving lessons? Or classes of some type every six months to help keep them safe? 

 

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Police: Man shot acted as if he was armed

Police: Man shot acted as if he was armed | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Baltimore County police say the officer who shot and killed a man after a foot chase Wednesday in Reisterstown appeared to be justified in use of force. He suspected the man of using a fake prescription at a drugstore. The officer is on administrative leave. The man he shot was not armed, but police say video shows he acted as if he was.
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Christa Lynch's comment, September 27, 2015 5:31 PM
It is frustrating to see so many of these situations happening all over the country. I have a huge issue with deadly forced, but also hold high respect for an officer to protect themselves. Who knows what mental state this man was in, or if he was under the influence. Hopefully the video proves to be more informative. I think the way the media reports these sensitive situations creates anger in the community and turns citizens against police. Hello First Amendment, but at what cost? Facts would be nice, instead of a vague, biased report.
Courtney Antilla's comment, October 4, 2015 4:10 PM
From the information given I think the officer was justified. If I was in a pursuit and the suspect acted as if he was pulling a gun on me I would move to defend myself. In situations like these seconds make all the difference and when you truly perceive your life as being in danger you reserve the right to act accordingly. I see why they are not releasing the video at this time as it is evidence but I would like to see it and see if the suspect truly acts like he has a gun.
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Fired sheriff's deputy who arrested Mel Gibson gets job back

Fired sheriff's deputy who arrested Mel Gibson gets job back | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Mee’s lawyers argued that sheriff’s managers falsely blamed Mee for leaking details of Gibson's 2006 arrest and the actor’s anti-Semitic tirade to celebrity news site TMZ.com. Mee, his attorneys alleged, was repeatedly subjected to harassment and unfair discipline in the years that followed, culminating in his firing over the 2011 crash.
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Courtney Antilla's comment, October 4, 2015 4:03 PM
If Mee truly messed up and was not doing his job correctly I see why they would fire him and not want him back. However I do not think the fact he arrested Mel Gibson of all people should be a part of it. Gibson being famous does not give him the right to drive while intoxicated. And his fame does not make it ok to fire people who call him out on illegal activity. I think Mee's actions need to be looked at and assessed without looking at who he arrested.
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California's racial profiling law is 'terrible' legislation, police officials say

California's racial profiling law is 'terrible' legislation, police officials say | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"We have contact with the public all the time that requires no documentation, no paperwork," he said. "Now, the amount of time we have to spend doing documentation and paperwork has gone up. The time doing menial tasks has gone up."

The extra work will cut into the time officers spend on community policing, James said. He cited that as one of several flaws in the legislation, not least of which is that it addresses a problem he contends doesn't even exist.
Rob Duke's insight:

We simply had a closeout screen on the traffic stop (just like every other call for service).  It required that we put in the violation, race of the driver and any passengers, and hit "send".  Seemed pretty painless to me.

I don't think the annual report will be too time consuming either.

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Judge Rules Police Are No Longer Allowed To Pepper Spray Students Whenever They Feel Like It - Counter Current News

Judge Rules Police Are No Longer Allowed To Pepper Spray Students Whenever They Feel Like It - Counter Current News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A new decision has just ruled that police officers have repeatedly used excessive and unconstitutional force by pepper-spraying students for minor school

Via Velvet Martin
Rob Duke's insight:

This isn't entirely unexpected: in the 1990's Eureka Police (1997), responding for mutual aid for the Sheriff's Dept., wiped pepper spray in the eyelids of forest activists protesting old growth forest logging (many protesters were Humboldt State students).  Some students were spray point blank in the face and, at least one student had some corneal damage from the blast.  My recollection is that the court ruled both of these as excessive force because the method of application wasn't standard nor recommended by the manufacturer.  Note that Lundberg V. County of Humboldt (2005) didn't rule that using pepper spray against students was excessive force, but that this method was excessive.  Given this, that left some in law enforcement to believe that one could still use chemicals if used in a manner recommended by the manufacturer.  (I applied for the Chiefs job in Eureka a year or two after this ruling, so I spent some time with the officers and one long-time command staff officer.  I will say that the department seemed under siege to me.  They'd had a string of seemingly justified officer involved shootings, but the sheer volume for that small libertarian community was too much, too often, too fast.  That issue has died down so the Captain that I ended up competing against in the final selection appears to have figured out a way to balance officer safety with a community desire to elevate individual rights.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lundberg_v._County_of_Humboldt

This case also stops short of banning pepper spray--ruling only that students in school have the same rights as adults in public (the headline is a little misleading).

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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, October 8, 2015 4:25 PM
The headline is misleading. If what is being reported true, then I have to say this is a case of misuse of force. To me, pepper spray is one of last tools a police officer should use- and only use when that officer or another person is at risk for harm. I do not feel like (again, if what is reported is true) the officer was in that position, especially when he supposedly sprayed a crying, pregnant teen. I agree with the court on this one and I think that they handled it well. Our officers should have the right to protect themselves when needed (leaving them the option of pepper spray) while still defending the rights of students- who, oh by the way, are minors.
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Do body cameras affect how police interact with the public? - Journalist's Resource

Do body cameras affect how police interact with the public? - Journalist's Resource | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Key findings:

Officers who did not wear body cameras conducted more “stop-and-frisks” and made more arrests than officers who wore the video cameras. Officers who did not wear cameras performed 9.8% more stop-and-frisks and made 6.9% more arrests.
Officers assigned to wear cameras issued 23.1% more citations for ordinance violations than those who did not wear cameras.
Officers with body cameras initiated 13.5% more interactions with citizens than those who did not wear them.
Officers wearing cameras were 25.2% more likely to perceive the devices as being helpful during their interactions with the public.
The cameras did not have a significant impact on whether or not officers gave verbal warnings to citizens.
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California measures target racial profiling and excessive force by police

California measures target racial profiling and excessive force by police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
One of the bills, AB 953, requires police officers to collect data on the people they stop, including perceived race and ethnicity, the reason for the encounter and the outcome.

In addition, the governor signed a requirement that law enforcement agencies provide annual reports with details on all cases in which officers are involved in uses of force that result in serious injury or death.

Those and others bills signed by the governor will "strengthen criminal justice in California," according to a statement by the governor's office.
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Police officer dies in South Carolina mall shooting

Police officer dies in South Carolina mall shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Law enforcement officials are investigating a report of an officer-involved shooting at a shopping mall near Columbia, South Carolina.
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Kelsey Therron Snell's comment, October 3, 2015 12:45 AM
I am so sorry to hear about this. I hope this man's wife is taken care of. This would be a good time for some restorative Justice practices, perhaps this man who killed the officer needs to be responsible for financially making sure this wife and child is taken care of in their lives. I wonder what kind of sentencing this man will receive?
Kelsey Therron Snell's curator insight, October 3, 2015 12:45 AM

I am so sorry to hear about this. I hope this man's wife is taken care of. This would be a good time for some restorative Justice practices, perhaps this man who killed the officer needs to be responsible for financially making sure this wife and child is taken care of in their lives. I wonder what kind of sentencing this man will receive?

Rob Duke's comment, October 3, 2015 11:44 AM
That's interesting that you say that: officers' families receive about $100k from the Feds, but that's not much in the scheme of things, but what I'd never thought about until our Troopers were killed last year is that the widows and the families lose their health insurance! Can you imagine? We need a non-profit that establishes a group plan for survivors.
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Whistleblower cop settles for $600K in NYPD quota suit

The NYPD cop who claimed he was thrown into Jamaica Hospital’s psychiatric ward for almost a week because he turned whistleblower to accuse his fellow cops of following a quota system for arres...
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Kelsey Therron Snell's comment, October 3, 2015 12:35 AM
well this is an interesting one isnt it...? I wonder how the agreement was made when he originally filed suit for 50 million and then got 600,000. pretty big difference there in numbers. Anyways, to me it is sad that this police officer is being so harshly discriminated against for doing the right thing and for being truthful in displaying these false acts of the police precinct. It seems kind of contrary that police would be so mean to someone who was being truthful, which is what police officers swear to do... Interesting dichotomy there.
Kelsey Therron Snell's curator insight, October 3, 2015 12:35 AM

well this is an interesting one isnt it...? I wonder how the agreement was made when he originally filed suit for 50 million and then got 600,000. pretty big difference there in numbers. Anyways, to me it is sad that this police officer is being so harshly discriminated against for doing the right thing and for being truthful in displaying these false acts of the police precinct. It seems kind of contrary that police would be so mean to someone who was being truthful, which is what police officers swear to do... Interesting dichotomy there.

Brittney Menzel's comment, October 4, 2015 3:30 AM
“The settlement should not be construed as an admission that the City or any City employee engaged in wrongdoing." Oh my goodness, this made me laugh. So all these fine members of the 81st prescint were involved in a dishonest scheme and only one person came forward? It makes me wonder how long this had been going on.
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Judge: Constitution "not relevant" - 1/3 - YouTube: Activist Opens Mouth and Removes all Doubt

Sponsor: http://RidleyReport.com/Class - Remember the "Judge wigs out" story where a New Hampshire-bound activist takes on a New Jersey court? http://www.you...

Via Dorothy Retha Cook
Rob Duke's insight:

This is the type of stupid obnoxious pedantic b.s. that cops deal with on the street all the time.  Cops usually have little recourse but to use their pencil to write the report or pen to write a citation--at least the court has the power to deal with these types of morons.

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These cops hilariously RSVP’d to a teen’s party on Facebook

These cops hilariously RSVP’d to a teen’s party on Facebook | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
If you're going to do something illegal, it's probably best not to advertise it publicly on social media.Some Canadian teens learned that lesson the hard(ish) way — and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police proved they aren't above having a little fun on the job. Police officers in Saskatchewan, Canada, got a tip about a party being hosted for college freshman. The drinking age in Canada is 19, meaning most of the students in attendance would likely be underage. Instead of just busting into the part
Rob Duke's insight:

It is meow time to shut down the party....

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Courtney Antilla's comment, October 4, 2015 4:16 PM
It is about time people learn what they post on social media is there for the world to see. I get tired of always seeing pictures and videos of my underage peers drinking and smoking all over facebook. People need to learn how to control themselves a little more. It is also nice to see how well the police handled it. This is why I am a strong supporter of police using their discretion.
Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, October 8, 2015 4:29 PM
That's hilarious. A very good lesson about the lack of privacy on social media. Did any of them take selfies while there?
Maddie Davis's comment, December 16, 2015 6:20 PM
This is actually pretty hilarious to me. I think it’s really smart on the cops part. This is a great example at how social media shows literally everything now days. Nobody can get away with anything. I’m sure more and more officers will begin using it as a source for teen parties and other cases. I remember back in High School a party got busted before it even started because the police already knew about it beforehand from social media
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The Unspoken Rape Crisis at Rikers Island | Broadly

A recent class action lawsuit alleges a culture of sexual abuse runs riot at the notorious jail.
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eamoe's comment, September 28, 2015 1:51 AM
It happened so frequently in the state system that a pending lawsuit threatened to expose the abuse of power in Alaska...then Governor Frank Murksowski reversed the Statutes of Limitations on Rape in Alaska in 2003...after that the Native community came forward with charges against the priests of the Catholic Church...that spread like wildfire to the lower 48...then it went global... Consequently, his daughter just added an addendum about sexual assault in the military...
Meagan Olsen's comment, September 30, 2015 4:19 AM
I found this article really sad to read about. The fact that the police are sometimes the one abusing the prisoners is not okay. They cannot abuse their power even if they think less of the people in jail. The woman, although they did bad things to get in prison, doesn’t mean they deserve to be violated and raped. Any kind of rape stories makes me sad to read about even in situations like this.
Jay Fulk's comment, October 1, 2015 4:39 PM
The abuse of power can run rampant inside prison walls. I think that there needs to be more processes in place to protect the female prisoners from the male guards. I wish that we could solve the problem by hiring strictly female guards for female prisons. I think that cameras need to be installed all throughout the prison so that guards cannot get away with raping inmates.
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Survey finds gaps between police force makeup, communities’ diversity | Latina Lista

Survey finds gaps between police force makeup, communities’ diversity | Latina Lista | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
By Becca Smouse Cronkite News PHOENIX – As part of the recruitment team for the Phoenix Police Department, Lt. Anthony Lopez says diversity pays dividends beyond reflecting the community served. “It’s absolutely essential to have diversity for an effective police department,” Lopez said. “And by that, I mean different races and genders.” The department has […]
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Brittney Menzel's comment, September 26, 2015 1:48 AM
So much bologna over race...
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The Latest: Police: Gun found next to man shot in wheelchair

The Latest: Police: Gun found next to man shot in wheelchair | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Latest on shooting in which Delaware police say officers fatally shot a man in a wheelchair (all times local):
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Citizen's Police Academy Use of Force Training

Citizen's Police Academy Use of Force Training | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Wednesday night's class got a look at the department's use of force simulator.
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eamoe's comment, September 28, 2015 1:59 AM
Lol...I think that is a good thing...to inform the public about how flocked a cops job really is...it's a 24/7 job...on-call and always obliged to assist in an emergency if off duty...they are a social worker, babysitter, and medic all in one...and the public should remember that...I have a client who meets and greets cops while out and thanks them for their service...the surprise look on most of their faces is priceless...it would seem the last thing they are expecting to hear...