Police Problems and Policy
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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San Bernardino may change minds on police use of surplus military equipment - LA Times

San Bernardino may change minds on police use of surplus military equipment - LA Times | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Images of police in armored vehicles and tactical gear confronting protesters in Ferguson, Mo., led to a backlash against what critics have termed the militarization of law enforcement.

After last week's mass shooting in San Bernardino, SWAT officers were hailed as heroes for using similar equipment to stop two heavily armed, Islamic State-inspired terrorists from inflicting even more harm.

With America's fear level rising, having police officers who look like soldiers may be more acceptable to some. Despite the changed climate, however, civil rights advocates and law enforcement experts say the question is not whether local agencies should have basic military equipment but whether that equipment is deployed in the right situations.

Civil rights attorney Connie Rice said that, as the events in San Bernardino unfolded, she was glad to see officers in camouflage riding on armored vehicles to confront the couple who had just killed 14 people.

Police "don't know whether they're facing more bombs, suicide vests. They could be facing any number of things," Rice said. "You expect that kind of response when you have that level of threat. You do not call this level of response out when there are just peaceful protesters."

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Fairbanks Four hearing on hold over legality of proposed settlement | Fairbanks Four - John Hartman murder | newsminer.com

Fairbanks Four hearing on hold over legality of proposed settlement | Fairbanks Four - John Hartman murder | newsminer.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Superior Court Judge Paul Lyle canceled an 11 a.m. Friday hearing because he may lack the authority to grant the deal crafted by both sides of the case, he said.

In his order, Lyle summarized the proposed settlement between state prosecutors and the four men seeking exoneration. The men maintain they are innocent of the 1997 killing of Fairbanks teenager John Hartman. The agreement between the men and the state comes in the midst of a civil lawsuit in which they're asking Lyle to reverse their convictions and declare them "actually innocent."

The deal would immediately free George Frese, Kevin Pease and Eugene Vent, the three men serving sentences that range from 38 to 79 years for their murder convictions. The fourth man, Marvin Roberts, was paroled earlier this year.

In return for their freedom, the men would withdraw their claims of innocence and agree not to sue "various governmental units" seeking monetary claims, according to Lyle's summary of the deal. The men have not formally pursued claims against Fairbanks police or state prosecutors, but they have argued their treatment amounts to prosecutorial misconduct.

Prosecutors under the deal would continue stand by their position that the men are "actually guilty beyond a reasonable doubt" and would reserve the right to prosecute the men again if they found new evidence against them.
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Rapist Cop Found Guilty

Rapist Cop Found Guilty | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Holtzclaw was charged with 36 counts of rape, forcible oral sodomy, burglary and other charges.


Shortly after 9 p.m. ET this evening, the jury returned guilty verdicts. It was their fourth day of deliberations. Holtzclaw was not found guilty on some counts, but he was found guilty of enough counts to spend the rest of his life in prison.

 

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Terror couple's bombs were set to kill first responders

Terror couple's bombs were set to kill first responders | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Bombs left at a Southern California social services facility by the gun-wielding radical Muslim couple who killed 14 and wounded 21 were set to go off when first responders arrived, Fox News learned on Monday, in a vicious strategy often seen in the Middle East.
Rob Duke's insight:

Always assume that there will be a secondary attack or IED set up to disrupt the first responders.  We rush in and engage the active shooter, but we also need to use some cunning.

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In Milwaukee, evidence is weak for the ‘Ferguson effect’

In Milwaukee, evidence is weak for the ‘Ferguson effect’ | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police chief says state budget cuts and lax gun laws are more likely to blame for a spike in homicide.
Rob Duke's insight:

Officers think it onerous report writing policy...

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Ex-Long Beach police officer pleads guilty to having sex with teenage girlfriend

Ex-Long Beach police officer pleads guilty to having sex with teenage girlfriend | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
GULFPORT -- A former Long Beach police officer has admitted he had sex with his 15-year-old girlfriend in his patrol car and a vacant house while on duty over a period of about five months.
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Report Shows Police Almost Always Justified In Fatal Shootings

Report Shows Police Almost Always Justified In Fatal Shootings | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A new Washington Post analysis shows that in almost all fatal police shootings, police are totally justified. The report analyzed 800 fatal police shootings. "But only a small number of the shooti
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Officers Indicted for Violating Inmate's Civil Rights

Four Louisiana correctional officers have been indicted on charges they violated the civil rights of an inmate, resulting in her death. The U.S. Department of Justice said in a news release Thursday that a grand jury indicted Capt. Andre Dominick, Cpl. Timothy Williams, and deputies Debra...
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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, December 4, 2015 1:59 AM

Even inmates in North Carolina get to receive and education even if public school age , and are EC children /students are incarcerated their local public school EC program provide the children/students.  Exceptional Children education services now in the state of North Carolina they are denying and depriving Exceptional Children qualified children that are not incarcerated their Human Right to equal access to enroll and attend NC Public Schools , Wilson County Public Schools per its LawFirm attorney Rachel B Hitch per their 2/18/13 dated letter sent by Rachel Hitch to then Prose Rep of NC OAH Special Education Contested Court Case 13-EDC-07545  Dorothy Cook . Dead children don't need an education ask WCS and Rachel Hitch why they want educate Destiny Cook and Megan Cook while they are not incarcerated! Like they do and have done all other children thru out the WCS years 2013-2014. 2014-2015. 2015-2016 and continuing even now 12/4/15 what they have allowed to enroll and attend school illegal immigrants or not. Does not the same laws apply for African American children in the state of North Carolina and NC Public Schools Educations as it does per Federal Court law suit decision for illegal Immigrants school age NC children which found equal access to enroll and attend NC Public School could not be denied because school aged children or their parents or care takers did not have the required legal NC documentation for enrollment before the law suit was filed being birth certificate or documentation of citizen ship. Would Rachel B. Hitch 2/18/13 dated letter not apply as doing the same thing the law suit prohibits by denying equal access to enrollment and attendance into NC public schools programs,activities and such for years at a time and continuing? 

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Bratton: NYPD to decide on chokehold charges

Bratton: NYPD to decide on chokehold charges | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
NYPD Commissioner William Bratton said Wednesday the department was prepared to decide whether to bring charges against the officer implicated in the July 2014 death
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Are you a leader or manager?

Are you a leader or manager? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

I see this chart as outlining some of the differences between leaders and managers. There is such a significant difference between the two.

 

Are you a leader or a manager? Do you know?


Via donhornsby, Roger Francis
Rob Duke's insight:

Since we talked about this in class....

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donhornsby's curator insight, December 3, 2015 10:20 AM

(From the article): While there is a significant difference between the orientation, demeanor, energy, qualities, and skills of leaders and managers, both are required to make things work. Both have a key role in achieving the best outcomes. And both need to work very closely to complement each other.

 

In the most powerful teams that I have seen, the leaders facilitated the creation of a bold vision and they inspired everyone to get on board and own them. Managers helped them to turn their bold visions into realities and results.

 

Unfortunately, too often I see managers playing the roles of leaders. They stifle their team’s energy, innovation, and success.

I also see leaders who don’t empower and use their managers wisely and effectively. Things don’t get done, people don’t see progress, and over time they get frustrated and discouraged.

 

When you have clarity and harmony between the two, you can form the best teams who can drive the greatest change, progress, and accomplishments.

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San Bernadino Shootout With Suspects

Live dispatch audio of the shootout between San Bernadino Sheriffs and the mass shooting suspects.
Rob Duke's insight:

3.5 minutes of actual audio from the shootout with terror suspects in San Berdoo....

 

I grew up 100 yards from San Bernardino Ave. and Shedden St. where this shootout happened.

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How the police duty belt went from Officer Friendly to Mad Max in 30 short years - The Washington Post

How the police duty belt went from Officer Friendly to Mad Max in 30 short years - The Washington Post | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Post Nation
How the police duty belt went from Officer Friendly to Mad Max in 30 short years
Resize Text Print Article Comments 39

By Ashley Balcerzak December 11

Istock
The modern era of police firepower dawned on Feb. 28, 1997, when 200 Los Angeles police officers armed with pistols and shotguns struggled to slow down two bank robbers carrying fully automatic rifles and wearing 40 pounds of body armor. Outgunned, several officers ran to local gun stores to borrow semiautomatic AR-15s, which they used to bring the gunmen down.

After the Battle of North Hollywood, police across the nation vowed never to be overpowered again. And so they jettisoned the 9 mm pistols, .38 Special revolvers and 12-gauge shotguns that were standard issue at the time, and began replacing them with semiautomatic handguns and the trusty AR-15.

The moment was part of a wider trend: the steady accumulation of new, more accurate and more deadly tools on the U.S. police officer’s duty belt and in his patrol car. So far this year, police nationwide have shot and killed more than 900 people, according to a Washington Post database tracking such shootings. As the nation debates the propriety of those encounters, law enforcement experts say the modern police duty belt may play a significant role in an officer’s decision to use deadly force.

“The more crap you put on your belt, the more apt you are to use it,” said Mark Lomax, executive director of the National Tactical Officers Association.
Rob Duke's insight:

But, we also had case law for about 10 years that forced police to use a force continuum of "try this first, then move up one level in force, etc."  This tended to encourage adding equipment that was lower in the force continuum.  Lawsuits also contributed to a succession of weapons that were disqualified for our use.  So, in the old days, I had sap gloves in a back pocket, a sap in that special little pocket on the back of my thigh (the pants were even made with these pockets for your sap).  On my belt, I had two sets of handcuffs, baton ring, radio holder, magazine pouches, key holder, mace, and holster/gun.  Give a lawsuit that says you can't use a sap or sap gloves, there those go; but, no problem, we still have the baton...which gets forgotten in the car quite often.  Give a lawsuit that says you have some liability if you don't try to use your baton before moving up in force level--even if you forgot it--suddenly we're forced to carry your batons all the time.  I had a k9 and that was a pain--it was always hitting the dog in the head.  Then the asp collapsible baton came out.  It's was so small when collapsed and took up only a few inches on my belt.  Eventually, I stopped carrying the baton altogether.  Then taser came out and it was a no brainer to add it to the belt.

I'm not sure what else the author thinks we added because that's all I ever carried and I've only been retired 4 years.

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Geneva raises alert level as manhunt seeks ISIS supporters - NY Daily News

Geneva raises alert level as manhunt seeks ISIS supporters - NY Daily News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A tip from the CIA sparked a massive manhunt in Geneva for at least four suspects believed to be associated with ISIS, Swiss officials said Thursday.

Authorities have raised the alert level to a “precise threat” from a “vague threat” as of Thursday afternoon after the tip on Wednesday, according to a Swiss official who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity.

A photo of men believed to be the four suspects appeared in a Swiss newspaper, Le Matin. They pose in a crouched position and hold up an index finger, a gesture associated with ISIS.
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Police: Teen took fake gun to school so cops would kill him


Via Doingtime2
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Maddie Davis's comment, December 16, 2015 3:25 PM
This article is actually really sad to me. It’s crazy to think that our country faces so many school shootings now days that teens and possibly other people are turning to it as a way to harm themselves because they know our police will. It’s sad that the teen wanted himself to die by the police but it’s also a good thing that he had no intention in harming the other students.
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US: Police 16 Times More Likely to Kill Mentally Ill People

US: Police 16 Times More Likely to Kill Mentally Ill People | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Mental illness is no longer treated by health professionals, but criminalized by the police, a report found. Continue reading


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Maddie Davis's comment, December 16, 2015 5:11 PM
Unfortunately, mental illness is still something our country doesn’t understand or seem to take seriously. It’s sad to read the statistics regarding police encounters involving someone with a mental illness. I think our nation needs to treat mental illness like they do other illnesses or injuries. It’s not something that health professionals should just brush off. There are a number of war veterans that suffer from PTSD and other mental illnesses and people just don’t think of it as a serious issue, when really it can lead to bad consequences.


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County leaders spar over jail after director arrested

County leaders spar over jail after director arrested | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
LAS CRUCES – Acting on orders from Doña Ana County Sheriff Enrique “Kiki” Vigil, law enforcement officials with the sheriff’s office arrested Christopher Barela, the director of the Doña Ana County Detention Center, on Tuesday morning as part of an o
Rob Duke's insight:

Pretty thinly disguised political theater.  The weapon offense occurred in 2012 and sounds more like a lapse in judgement than what the intent of the law was likely to have been when the law was enacted.  e.g. I've seen rooky cops forget to unholster and bring a gun into the booking area on numerous occasions.  It's easily fixed by telling the inexperienced officer to go back and secure his/her weapon.  Given the "hokey-ness" of the "contraband" charge, I'd be leery of accepting the embezzlement of $20k story without further independent investigation.  If those funds were used to improve inmate life in some way (clothing, bedding, hygiene care products, computerized kiosks, etc.), then they probably were used in a manner that won't constitute embezzlement or even fraud.  We'll see if more info develops, but this looks like the sheriff is engaging in some rent-seeking behavior in an attempt to take back control of the jail.  The problem with this is: 1. a pragmatic problem of acting too soon without proper authority, which will likely severely damage his attempt--even if it's logical and reasonable for the change to take place; and, 2. real people are involved with real lives and to arrest someone for theater is an ethical problem of the highest degree.

A warrant could have been sought, and arranged so that the jail administrator could arrange bail.  Then, a court date some reasonable time in the future could have been set.  This isn't a flight risk or a violent crime.  Not having taken this reasonable route seems to support the notion that the sheriff wanted an excuse to go in and "take over".

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No charges against Chicago officer who shot Ronald Johnson - CNN.com

No charges against Chicago officer who shot Ronald Johnson  - CNN.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
No charges against George Hernandez, the Chicago officer who shot Ronald Johnson, according to Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez.
Rob Duke's insight:

Excerpt:

At a news conference, Assistant U.S. Attorney Lynn McCarthy played dashboard camera video of the shooting for reporters. The video appeared to show Johnson running away from police officers and into a public park. Out of view of the camera, the 25-year-old was shot twice, she said.

For nearly an hour, McCarthy used a PowerPoint presentation to explain in detail where police cars were and where Johnson ran from officers. The officers were in the area responding to numerous 911 calls from residents saying that shots had been fired. Some of those calls were played at the news conference.

McCarthy explained that Johnson had been in a car with three other people that was shot at, had left the scene and then returned. While officers were interviewing one of the men in that car, Johnson tried to run.

An independent police board reviewed the dashboard camera video, McCarthy said, and decided that Officer George Hernandez was not wrong for shooting Johnson.

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Obscure knife-gun cited in Chicago police shooting case

Obscure knife-gun cited in Chicago police shooting case | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
CHICAGO — It sounds like something James Bond would carry: A knife that's also a gun.But it is the kind of thing police officers are warned about from time to time, just as they are about guns disguised as belt buckles and tire gauges and motorcycle handlebars modified to fire a shotgun round.The knife-gun, which isn't well known outside of gun enthusiast circles, has pushed its way into the case surrounding the 2014 killing of Laquan McDonald, a black 17-year-old who was shot 16 times by a whi
Rob Duke's insight:

It depends on the officer's training and experience.  If he's been trained on this, then it's something the court must consider.

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Maddie Davis's comment, December 16, 2015 6:58 PM
I thought this was an interesting article. I never even knew there was such a thing as a knife-gun. I think in this case it can be justified. If the officer has been trained to handle situations like this then that is something they need to consider in this case. He was defending himself, but however I think shooting one person 16 times is a little excessive.
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The Two Sides of Employee Engagement

The Two Sides of Employee Engagement | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
For the most part, companies oversimplify things by viewing personal satisfaction as a proxy for engagement. As a result, they miss key behavioral signals. What use are Mary’s positive thoughts about her manager, for example, if she is not giving her maximum effort at work every day? Other companies use people analytics to examine employees’ behaviors and organizational performance but then fail to take individuals’ perceptions into account. John may be interacting with clients outside work, but is he happy doing so, or is he burned out and miserable?
Rob Duke's insight:

This is another important aspect of police administration and management.  We're examining how we might better use organizations to control the negative aspects of power; and, having positively engaged employees makes it much easier to change the organization and maintain positive (soft) power habits.

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Silent screams

Silent screams | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Why you might prefer a Bangkok jail to one in Chiba
Rob Duke's insight:

As a step towards restoring due process, all interrogations should be filmed from start to finish. Suspects should have ready access to defence counsel, to whom prosecutors should also disclose all evidence. Interrogations should be much shorter; suspects should be properly rested. Investigators who fabricate evidence should be put in the dock themselves. Prosecution cases should rely more on detective work, and less on self-incrimination. Such reforms would not improve conditions in Japan’s psychologically brutal prisons (see article). But they would give the innocent a better chance of keeping their liberty.

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Court: 'Cannibal cop' committed no crime

Court: 'Cannibal cop' committed no crime | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Manhattan federal appeals court has affirmed a trial judge’s finding that so-called “cannibal cop” Gilberto Valle was not guilty of conspiring to kidnap and
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Drug Laws and Gun Controls Are Just Business Opportunities for Corrupt Cops

Drug Laws and Gun Controls Are Just Business Opportunities for Corrupt Cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Who watches the watchmen? Whoever is doing deals with them, off the books.

Via deana p
Rob Duke's insight:

Point, but too shortsighted.  The problem is the institutional structure that allows underground economies.  We should be experimenting with institutional rules, such as those in Portugal, that will reduce the likelihood and negative consequences of underground black and gray markets.

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