Police Problems and Policy
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Adams County rancher shot and killed by deputies

Adams County rancher shot and killed by deputies | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
COUNCIL, Idaho -- Idaho State Police are investigating an officer-involved shooting in Adams County Monday morning. The shooting happened overnight
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Video surfaces showing Sitka police using Taser on high school student 10 times in holding cell

Video surfaces showing Sitka police using Taser on high school student 10 times in holding cell | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Surveillance video posted to YouTube shows a high school student in southeast Alaska stripped to his underwear and restrained by three Sitka police officers while one uses a Taser on his bare skin more than 10 times.  
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Brittney Menzel's comment, November 7, 2015 2:23 AM
Wow. Words almost fail me. I do understand that intoxicated can be extremely difficult to handle, but either way, the officers went overboard on this one. I am interested to see what (if anything) happens in this case. Southeast in heart.
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Dorothy Bland: I was caught ‘walking while black.’
Police chief: No, officers were doing their jobs.

Dorothy Bland: I was caught ‘walking while black.’<br/>Police chief: No, officers were doing their jobs. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The UNT journalism dean says she was profiled, but Corinth police chief says officers were just worried for her safety.
Rob Duke's insight:

Interesting video: It shows the perception difference from both sides of the encounter.

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4 cops injured, 3 youths busted after brawl near Pa. school

4 cops injured, 3 youths busted after brawl near Pa. school | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Some Authorities say four cops were injured and three teens arrested after officers tried to break up a brawl near a Pennsylvania high school.

Rob Duke's insight:

This is the other side of the argument that officers should never use force on "children".  These suspects are hardly children in physique or in behavior.

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Laura Lee Smith's comment, November 3, 2015 12:46 AM
I agree, just being under the age of 18 no longer defines you as being a child just as being born physically male doesn't make you a man.
Lorraine Stewart's comment, November 3, 2015 4:04 PM
Not only are the students the size of grown men, they are equally as strong. In some ways, they are more dangerous because their brains are still developing and they don’t always think of the true consequences of their actions; consequences to them and others impacted by their behavior. We are losing control of our youth in America. If these “children” can take down trained officers, who is left to protect citizens from these kinds of monsters? When children act up, they need to be held accountable for their behavior. Schools no longer have the right to control or punish students for inappropriate behavior on school property. School resource officers apparently do not have much control either, which leads me to wonder why they are even at the schools if they are unable to assist when needed most. Kids today are given rights they haven’t earned. Parents aren’t being held accountable for the bad behavior of their children, but instead, often make excuses. Some parents don’t seem to be parenting at all. I don’t envy the officers that are tasked with keeping our communities safe. I hope the youth featured in this video receive the appropriate punishment they deserve.
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Paralysed by YouTube

Paralysed by YouTube | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A WALK around the many stands in one of the halls of McCormick Place, a gigantic convention centre in Chicago, during the annual conference of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), showed how the debate on policing has changed in America. The Peerless Handcuff Company was still hawking its wares, as was Peacekeeper, which sells batons and lets prospective customers bash “Numb John XT”, a dummy, to try them out. But the buzz, helped by a cohort of forceful public-relations executives, was around vendors of body cameras, data collection and information-sharing technologies with snazzy names such as Vievu, BodyWorn or SceneDoc.

Cops in America have had a tough year. Videos of perceived or real police brutality have gone viral at regular intervals, causing loud public outcry and leading to demands that all police officers should wear body cameras. These troubles are not going away. Violent crime is on the rise in nearly all big cities, and the level of trust between police and the public, and minority communities in particular, is at an all-time low. In Milwaukee, a genteel midwestern town, 104 people have been murdered in the first eight months of the year, more than the 86 who died in the whole of 2014. St Louis reported a 60% rise in killings over the same period. And in Chicago six people were killed and 28 wounded over just the weekend before the conference.
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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, October 31, 2015 3:21 PM
One of the downsides to social media. It's almost unnerving to see how often and consistently these videos are coming out. It doesn't make their jobs easier, and certainly hasn't helped the crime rate.
Isaac Peacock's comment, November 1, 2015 11:14 PM
A double edged sword may be an appropriate term for these new body cams. The pressure put on to use them and the relentless march of technology is so high and fast that the cams can never be put down. They can help with reduce crimes by increasing the honesty of stats as the in favor of comstats showcased. And the nypd with its clean record and good reputation post comstat will not be a great or novel task.
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The Facts Behind the 'Ferguson Effect'

The Facts Behind the 'Ferguson Effect' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A significant spike in murder rates around the country has many law enforcement officials endorsing a controversial hypothesis: that negative police publicity in recent months has made police officers less inclined to work with communities to fight crime—a theory known as the “Ferguson effect.”

Last week, FBI director James B. Comey seemingly endorsed the idea at a conference of police chiefs in Chicago saying that a “chill wind” has strained relations between police and the citizens they are sworn to protect. “I do have a strong sense that some part of the explanation is a chill wind that has blown through American law enforcement over the last year,” Comey said at the conference. “And that wind is surely changing behavior.”
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Laura Lee Smith's comment, November 3, 2015 12:48 AM
Why wouldn't it? Get told you're a monster enough times and you just might become one.
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Australia rejects Amnesty's bribery allegations as 'slur' on border police

Australia rejects Amnesty's bribery allegations as 'slur' on border police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Australia has denied a report by Amnesty International that it secretly paid off people-smugglers. The report cites two instances of arranging payments to ensure migrants stay out of Australia's territorial waters.

Via @MikeKenealy
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Understand the 4 Components of Influence

Understand the 4 Components of Influence | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The final aspect of influence is the subtlest of the four, and as such rarely can trump either positional authority or passion.  But in rare instances, artfully manipulated, I have seen it prevail.  What is it?  It is the mastery of the dance of human interaction.

We have very little conscious awareness of this aspect of influence, but we are all participants in it with more or less expertise.  We learn at a very early age that conversation is a pas de deux, a game that two (or more) people play that involves breathing, winking, nodding, eye contact, head tilts, hand gestures, and a whole series of subtle non-verbal signals that help both parties communicate with one another.

Indeed, conversation is much less functional without these nonverbal signals. 
Rob Duke's insight:

This is an important skill to study and master.  Soft power is much more effective than hard power.

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Quentin Tarantino: LAPD Union Joins NYPD in Boycott of Filmmaker

Quentin Tarantino: LAPD Union Joins NYPD in Boycott of Filmmaker | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"I'm a human being with a conscience," said Tarantino at the Saturday rally. "And if you believe there's murder going on, then you need to rise up and stand up against it. I'm here to say I'm on the side of the murdered."

The director of the upcoming Hateful Eight also said, "When I see murders, I do not stand by. ... I have to call a murder a murder, and I have to call the murderers the murderers," according to multiple reports.

Patrick Lynch, president of the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, called Tarantino a "purveyor of degeneracy" who "has no business coming to our city to peddle his slanderous 'Cop Fiction.' "
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Prosecutor: Officer Who Fatally Shot Teen Committed No Crime

Prosecutor: Officer Who Fatally Shot Teen Committed No Crime | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A South Carolina prosecutor says a police officer who shot and killed a 19-year-old during a drug sting didn't correctly approach the teenager's car, but that doesn't make him criminally responsible. Solicitor Chrissy Adams announced Tuesday that no charges will be filed against Lt. Mark...
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Kelsey Therron Snell's comment, October 30, 2015 12:23 AM
Sooooooooo once again we see a victim (I use this term extremely loosely here) who had committed crimes, was engaged in illegal activity, and who did not respond to or follow a police officers direct orders, being shot and taken down for trying to hurt a police officer, and it is causing an uproar based solely on the fact that the cop was white and the young man was of color. This is becoming quite irritating to read about and I am actually getting a little tired of reading about them. Get over it people, he broke the law and was breaking the law and yet somehow he is a victim of a crime committed against humanity based on race? I couldn't even argue that one and I am damn good at it.
Kelsey Therron Snell's curator insight, October 30, 2015 12:23 AM

Sooooooooo once again we see a victim (I use this term extremely loosely here) who had committed crimes, was engaged in illegal activity, and who did not respond to or follow a police officers direct orders, being shot and taken down for trying to hurt a police officer, and it is causing an uproar based solely on the fact that the cop was white and the young man was of color. This is becoming quite irritating to read about and I am actually getting a little tired of reading about them. Get over it people, he broke the law and was breaking the law and yet somehow he is a victim of a crime committed against humanity based on race? I couldn't even argue that one and I am damn good at it. 

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Cops In Classrooms Are Rarely Evaluated

Cops In Classrooms Are Rarely Evaluated | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The white sheriff’s deputy who grabbed a black student’s chair, flipped her over and dragged her across the floor on Monday at Spring Valley High School in Columbia, South Carolina, prompting an FB…
Rob Duke's insight:

In the spirit of Wm. K. Muir's Paradoxes of Power, I have coined the idea of the Paradox of Proximity.  In the case of School officers, that proximity isn't elected officials (although victims are universal), but instead are the school officials.  These officials are quite accustomed to absolute power and often ask officers to back them up even when what they ask is unwise or counter-productive in terms of symbolic meaning.  Ours is not to question why: Ours is but to do or die.  You learn quickly that you don't contradict a principal.  Your position is often contracted and if you get banned from campus, as has happened in this case, you lose your position.

 

Every education code contains a violation of law, a crime, of disrupting education.  Each state words theirs differently, but it is a common code.  In South Carolina, that code is in Title 59, section 59-63-120(b) (copied at the bottom).

Principals are very aware of this code and willing to use every power to control a school environment.

 

While I think it might be more prudent to wait for this student to leave for the day and then deny her access to school until she submits to discipline, the principal may have been unwilling to take this route.  It will be interesting to see what details emerge as this case moves forward.

 

ARTICLE 2

Safe School Climate Act


SECTION 59-63-110. Citation of article.

This article may be cited as the "Safe School Climate Act".

HISTORY: 2006 Act No. 353, Section 2, eff June 12, 2006.

SECTION 59-63-120. Definitions.

As used in this article:

(1) "Harassment, intimidation, or bullying" means a gesture, an electronic communication, or a written, verbal, physical, or sexual act that is reasonably perceived to have the effect of:

(a) harming a student physically or emotionally or damaging a student's property, or placing a student in reasonable fear of personal harm or property damage; or

(b) insulting or demeaning a student or group of students causing substantial disruption in, or substantial interference with, the orderly operation of the school.

(2) "School" means in a classroom, on school premises, on a school bus or other school-related vehicle, at an official school bus stop, at a school-sponsored activity or event whether or not it is held on school premises, or at another program or function where the school is responsible for the child.

HISTORY: 2006 Act No. 353, Section 2, eff June 12, 2006.

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Group may be planning Halloween ambush, FBI reportedly tells police

The Federal Bureau of Investigation reportedly released and alert Monday that warned police departments across the country about an anarchist group that says it is planning to use to holiday to ambush police.
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On duty, under fire

On duty, under fire | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Snyder soon realized he was being followed. Outside the Pick ’n Save grocery store, he abruptly turned his car around. He raised his semiautomatic pistol and opened fire, striking Casper in the neck.

Snyder and Casper jumped out of their cars while they were still rolling. The 21-year-old trooper, armed with a .40-caliber Glock, and the 38-year-old bank robber circled the cruiser, guns blazing. Casper fired 12 rounds; Snyder got off nine armor-piercing bullets, one of which penetrated Casper’s ballistic vest. And when it was over, Snyder lay dying of a gunshot wound to his back.

“Bad guy is down,” a dispatcher reported.

Casper collapsed and then dropped his gun. March 24 was his first solo day on the job — and his last. Shot three times, he became the youngest law enforcement officer killed in the line of duty in Wisconsin history. Casper is among 31 officers this year who have been shot to death by perpetrators, according to the Officer Down Memorial Page. He was hailed as a hero for stopping Snyder, who had magazines of ammunition tucked in his socks and left a manifesto promising “to go down fighting hard.”
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Ohio voters soundly reject marijuana legalization initiative

Ohio voters soundly reject marijuana legalization initiative | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Four other states, including Alaska, and the District of Columbia have already legalized the recreational sale of marijuana, which is still a federal crime. Ohio would have been the first state in the Midwest to do so.
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Watch These Cops Intimidate Someone Legally Filming an Arrest | VICE | United States

Watch These Cops Intimidate Someone Legally Filming an Arrest | VICE | United States | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
First the Toronto police officers invade the filmer's personal space, then ask if his video will appear on World Star.
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Students walk out to show support for fired S.C. school deputy

Students walk out to show support for fired S.C. school deputy | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
About 100 students at a South Carolina high school walked out of class briefly Friday to show support for a school resource officer fired after video showed him throwing an uncooperative black female student across the floor, according to local media and Twitter feeds.

The students walked out of classes at Spring Valley High School in Columbia, S.C., around 10 a.m. and gathered in the atrium to express their views on the firing of Deputy Ben Fields.
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Isaac Peacock's comment, November 1, 2015 11:54 PM
I do not know if it was race based but it shows that police often need to resort to the power of the sword to keep order and control crime. But the range of coercion used is a delicate line to walk and many of the officers who end up in the news have typically failed to keep balance. This telegraphs police incompetence and forgetfulness of training to the public. And must be punished to show that slip ups are not tolerated to other police and to the populace submitting to their power.
Laura Lee Smith's comment, November 3, 2015 12:47 AM
I wish I could have been in that room to see what really went on
Lorraine Stewart's comment, November 3, 2015 3:48 PM
I would like to applause these particular students for having the common sense to know that the officer was merely doing his job and the disruptive student is the one to blame for this whole incident. The young lady featured in the original video has not only caused a good officer to lose his job, but also disrupted a school day as students feel the need to stand up for what they believe in…to stand up for what is right. Unfortunately, I don’t think there act of support will help the officer as his reputation has already been tarnished in that community by the out-of-context video that was released all over the internet. I was always under the impression that reporters have a moral obligation to present information that is factual, but the trend seems to be leading more to the sensationalism of a story, regardless of the actual facts.
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Marketing of weight-loss video by McDonald's to children questioned

Marketing of weight-loss video by McDonald's to children questioned | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Many McDonald's restaurants provide financial support to underfunded educators and parent-teacher groups. At the same time, McDonald's features Cisna in a 20-minute documentary it promotes to schools, along with lesson plans and guest speakers, through its nationwide network of franchisees.

Nutrition experts say the arrangement in an educational environment - at a time of intense concern about youth obesity - ends up sending a dangerous message to kids about what makes for healthful eating.
Rob Duke's insight:
Is this an example of rent-seeking behavior by an organization?  (Using an event or person to advance their own cause).  
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eamoe's comment, November 1, 2015 11:19 PM
Well can we counter that with someone tapping the shoulder of the organic foods industry? I mean McDonalds is the LAST place to learn nutrititon...someone is got a brain freeze going on...as they tease in the fast food industry...I am sure the workers would start laughing...
Isaac Peacock's comment, November 1, 2015 11:38 PM
I believe an oil company destroying an environment but promising free money and sound advise on some other controversial issues to take away from their own would count as a rent. And this sounds a lot like the hypothetical oil analogy to me. But better to go neutral then all out ugly. It could be compared to discretion in its dual sides of good and bad. Is either side so good or bad as to outweigh the other?
Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, November 3, 2015 10:35 PM
I found this article really interesting because I would never think that eating McDonalds could result to weight loss. I don’t know if I truly believe that this Iowa teacher ate McDonalds straight for 6 months and ended up loosing 56 pounds. That just doesn’t seem right. But if this is actually true, this might be a good thing since McDonald’s is cheaper, so expenses for kids would not be that bad since this is focused on the health of children.
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Two police officers shot in Tennessee firefight: broadcasters

Two police officers shot in Tennessee firefight: broadcasters | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Two police officers were shot on Thursday evening in a firefight with a home intruder in the western Tennessee city of Hohenwald, broadcasters WSMV and WKRN reported.
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Judge Sentenced To 28 Years For Selling ‘Kids For Cash’ To Prisons

Judge Sentenced To 28 Years For Selling ‘Kids For Cash’ To Prisons | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Pennsylvania judge in Pennsylvania was just sentenced to 28 years in prison for selling “kids-for-cash.”

Via Community Village Sites, Dorothy Retha Cook
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Community Village Sites's curator insight, August 28, 2015 2:11 AM

#PrisonsForProfit

Courtney Antilla's comment, November 1, 2015 4:52 PM
There is a great documentary on Netflix about this case I watched a few weeks ago. I found it fascinating how corrupt some people can be. I saw it also as a great example as to why zero tolerance policies only create more problems. 28 years is not long enough when you consider the number of years he put children in prison.
Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, November 3, 2015 10:46 PM
I think this is a huge issue that goes unnoticed because I feel as if a lot of judges do this and get away with taking bribes, this judge in Pennsylvania just happened to get caught. It makes my stomach turn that people are able to do this with a clear conscious, the fact that this judge is willing to put kids away for the exchange of money is inhumane. I am glad that they caught him, I just wish these kids could have another trial that would be more fair.
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South Carolina deputy fired for throwing student, even though 'she started this,' sheriff says

South Carolina deputy fired for throwing student, even though 'she started this,' sheriff says | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Lott, the sheriff, has said that deputies in schools receive higher levels of training and that Fields was up-to-date on his requirements.

But there have been multiple allegations of wrongdoing in the past against Fields.

Lott said a number of complaints had been filed against him over the years and that “a number of them have been sustained” and many had not. He did not give further details and did not release Fields’ personnel file Wednesday.

Fields had been sued at least three times in the last 10 years, with all three lawsuits accusing him of acting aggressively or wrongly implicating innocent people.
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Rob Duke's comment, November 1, 2015 10:21 PM
It's 20:20 hindsight, but hearing that she has recently become an orphan. I wonder if it wouldn't have been better to clear the classroom, so she was without an audience and then try to get to the bottom of her behavior--sort of like the "Thinkery" that Ron & Roxanne Claassen taught us about in May. In the Discipline That Restores (DTR) model, first the minor is given a chance to participate in a respect agreement, then behavior is referenced to this beginning agreement. If behavior ever becomes so disruptive that the class cannot function, then the minor is given the option to take vertical discipline (expulsion, etc.) or enter into mediation with the teacher. The last stage is the thinkery where the student places themselves in the role of the institution and evaluates the need for rules and how to best enforce them. Fewer than 1% of students move on to discipline from this stage. Like I said, though, I have the benefit of 20:20 hindsight and information that the officer is likely not to have had.
eamoe's comment, November 1, 2015 11:27 PM
Lol...well instead of getting the resource officer they should have got the oldest teacher...they would have done what I saw as a kid when they did this...the teacher stopped and put the book down and said 'well class let's see what (fill in the blank) wants today and let's help them out..pull up your chairs and see if you can help them out...so the kids stop and pull up desks and chairs to the kid being arnry...lol...well that didn't last long...it was 'leave me alone' and they said well 'you got our attention what do you want"? The kid settled down and the frequencies of that almost stopped...guess they didn't want THAT much attention...now instead of the teacher FREAKING out he should have said 'oh well what is so interesting' and show the class...and have the class get up to find out as well? What would have the outcome been as opposed to the cop tossing her like a tator tot? And for the record I am a teachers kid so I know how far some of these kids push it...as I have done as well...smile...no I didn't get the 'hey let's help them out treatment' it was worse! I had to help the janitor!!! Those were the days of education...
Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, November 3, 2015 10:54 PM
I do not care what the situation was and who started it, I do not think at any time it is appropriate for a full grown male officer to be throwing around a high school girl. If she was not listening, he shouldn’t have used force like that. That is completely unnecessary, especially because it says in the article it says this isn’t the officer’s first time throwing a student around. But then there were many people that backed him up. I do not for a second the reason of all this was because of racism because many African Americans had his back on this issue. I think this an act of abuse of power, and his power of authority just got to his head.
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Watch an NYPD Cop Tackle and Pepper-Spray a 22-Year-Old Skateboarder | VICE | United States

Watch an NYPD Cop Tackle and Pepper-Spray a 22-Year-Old Skateboarder | VICE | United States | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
What's tricky to decipher here is whether the maneuver the cop used on Mu technically qualifies as a chokehold. An NYPD spokesman told VICE News that Mu refused to comply with the officer's request to sit down so he could issue a summons, and that Mu also refused to put his hands behind his back, prompting the struggle. The spokesman declined to comment about whether the move used by the officer was a chokehold, but did indicate that Internal Affairs is looking into the matter.

"I would say this was a headlock and not a chokehold," says Joseph Giacalone, a former NYPD Detective Sergeant and law enforcement expert at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in Manhattan. "The reason I say this is that the maneuver does not go around the front of the neck which would obstruct breathing."
Rob Duke's insight:

It's getting so an officer can't even do his/her job without some knucklehead thinking he/she can ignore lawful commands.  This is a video looking for an issue.

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Kelsey Therron Snell's comment, October 30, 2015 1:10 AM
And yet again, this young jackass took it upon himself to cause so much more trouble than was necessary. WHAT A SELF RIGHTEOUS LITTLE TWAT. Seriously, this kid made it so much worse than what it needed to be. Instead of receiving what was probably a 50 dollar fine for skating in a no skating zone, he instead resisted arrest and played a victim of police brutality and of discrimination. Seriously, what a self righteous little jackass twat. Teach this kid a lesson and beat the living hell out of him next time. What is so wrong with today's youth that they can not simply listen and do as they are asked by law enforcement or by their elders. No, instead they make it so much worse for themselves and for others. Also of note, I wonder if the police officer even thought of the skateboard being used as a weapon against him...
Kelsey Therron Snell's curator insight, October 30, 2015 1:10 AM

And yet again, this young jackass took it upon himself to cause so much more trouble than was necessary. WHAT A SELF RIGHTEOUS LITTLE TWAT. Seriously, this kid made it so much worse than what it needed to be. Instead of receiving what was probably a 50 dollar fine  for skating in a no skating zone, he instead resisted arrest and played a victim of police brutality and of discrimination. Seriously, what a self righteous little jackass twat. Teach this kid a lesson and beat the living hell out of him next time. What is so wrong with today's youth that they can not simply listen and do as they are asked by law enforcement  or by their elders. No, instead they make it so much worse for themselves and for others. Also of note, I wonder if the police officer even thought of the skateboard being used as a weapon against him...

Laura Lee Smith's comment, November 3, 2015 12:50 AM
I agree people have lost all respect for law enforcement, and why should they have respect for boundaries, many of them have grown up with parents who set none.
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Media Lynch Mob Targets Classroom Cop for ‘Racist Brutality’… But Facts Tell a VERY Different Story | Top Right News

Media Lynch Mob Targets Classroom Cop for ‘Racist Brutality’… But Facts Tell a VERY Different Story | Top Right News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
by Brooke Bosca | Top Right News The story of the day across America was the media shredding of a classroom cop in South Carolina for his racist assault of a innocent Black female student.
Rob Duke's insight:

The new video from a different angle shows the officer start picking her up to carry her from the room when she knees him and begins hitting him.  The story isn't quite what it was sold as in the earliest news stories.  Scroll down about 1/3 of the page for the new video.

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Lorraine Stewart's comment, October 30, 2015 2:34 PM
I couldn't agree with you more, Kelsey!
Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, October 31, 2015 3:25 PM
I agree with Kelsey. The best way to not end up in one of these videos is to actually treat the officers with respect and follow his/her instructions.
Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, October 31, 2015 3:26 PM
PS: I'm also so tired of hearing about these incidents and everyone screaming police brutality- yes, it happens BUT not every cop being filmed and put onto youtube is it.
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Sheriff to Decide If Deputy Keeps Job After Classroom Arrest

Sheriff to Decide If Deputy Keeps Job After Classroom Arrest | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A South Carolina sheriff's deputy who flipped a student backward in her desk and tossed her across the floor for refusing to leave math class could learn as soon as Wednesday whether he will be fired. Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott said once his agency's internal investigation is...
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Lorraine Stewart's comment, October 28, 2015 9:05 PM
This whole incident is being blown so far out of proportion. This officer was purely doing his job. People do not have a right to behave in this manner, especially children. Black, white, red, blue green; skin color should not matter. I have viewed the video from a couple different perspectives and it is very clear this officer did not use excessive force in this incident. There seems to be a shift in the perception of authority amongst people today. I sincerely hope that the investigation reveals that the officer did nothing wrong, but because of social media misrepresenting the actual facts of this particular case, some citizens will continue to believe the information initially publicized. This could potentially destroy the career of a good officer. How many officers are going to continue to serve if they fear repercussions from merely doing their job? How many good officers are we going to lose because of disrespectful, disobedient people who believe they are above the law for whatever reason? I’m starting to see the larger role media plays in instigating panic among citizens and how they can so easily misrepresent facts.
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4 Stresses Law Enforcement Officers Deal With That Non-Law Enforcement Officers Should Know About

4 Stresses Law Enforcement Officers Deal With That Non-Law Enforcement Officers Should Know About | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
People die every day. Accidents happen every day. In rare instances, a dramatic tragedy unexpectedly takes the lives of one or thousands. However, in general, most occupations involve a generally safe assumption that you will go to work and come home at the end of the day. Being a police officer requires that you prepare daily for death. We put on bullet proof vests and carry guns for a reason: we are ready for the fight, and unfortunately not every warrior comes home. Taking just the last 5 years of line-of-duty deaths into account, a police officer is killed in action every 2-3 days. To put that in perspective, that is 727 lives lost of men and women who gave all to serve others. Cops are at war out there. The Norman Rockwell vision of a police officer cannot always apply. A heart that desires to help others is a pre-requisite for this job, but a mind sharp and ready to defend is of equal necessity.

In one sense, we must relegate this reality into a part of our mind that permits us to be effective in continuing to move on and do our job with professionalism and self-sacrifice. In another sense, in order to be ready for the fight, we must remind ourselves daily that we are in it. In doing so, we’re better able to love our spouses, hug our kids more and help our friends however we can in this life.
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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, October 31, 2015 3:30 PM
One officer killed every 2-3 days- that has got to hit hard and stay with you. That alone has got to effect how you do your job, let alone how your family deals. Sadly, in our society right now some people would actually be happy to see that statistic. It's disgusting. Yes, there are issues in the system- issues that need to be addressed; HOWEVER, these officers risk their lives everyday to protect and serve (even communities that don't want them).
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