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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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WNYC News - Map: NYPD Finds Most Guns Outside Stop-and-Frisk Hotspots

WNYC News - Map: NYPD Finds Most Guns Outside Stop-and-Frisk Hotspots | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly argue the main purpose of stop-and-frisk is to get guns off the street.  Out of more than 685,000 stops in 2011, about 770 guns were recovered.  That means about one tenth of one percent...
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Lori Jo's comment, October 29, 2012 1:06 AM
Haha. I like how no one really sounds very surprised. “What does this pattern mean? Well, that depends on whom you ask”. I don’t think it does. I think it shows that stop and frisk is Not working. The cops argue that it is because it is deterring those who would normally carry from doing so. I don’t think so. I think those people are out there, they’re just smart enough to not get stopped. If I had a gun and intended to commit crime, I would stay the hell away from the cops that were patrolling my neighborhood. I really feel like this is more proof that the program doesn’t work. Anywhere.
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Cherokee County teen shot by police sniper, parents speak out

Cherokee County teen shot by police sniper, parents speak out | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The parents of a 16-year-old suicidal boy spoke only with CBS Atlanta News' Wendy Saltzman after their son was gunned down by a police sniper in Cherokee County.
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Donna Sharp's comment, October 30, 2012 11:05 AM
After watching the two clips of this story I am so saddened and feel for his family and friends. I cannot believe that when his parents called the police to help their son who was suicidal they sent the whole swat team sniper and all! I also can’t believe that instead of actually helping this poor boy that only after an hour they just shot him and tried to justify it by saying he was acting in an aggressive manor, the boy was only 16 year old he had been drinking and was suicidal, they stated that the autopsy report showed that the boy was shot in a location that would have made it almost impossible for him to be pointing his gun at the negotiation team at the time the sniper shot him. I wonder if there was any action taken against the sniper or department for this horrible incident that didn’t need to happen.
biggamevince's comment, October 30, 2012 5:21 PM
You have a suicidal teen that is in a standoff by and he is the only threat to himself with a .357 magnum. Is it necessary to have a SWAT team and riot control for this type of incident? Now the sheriff believed the teen made an "aggressive gesture" that caused a sniper to fire his weapon to protect other officers who were negotiating with the teen. However, attorney Chuck Pekor believes that the sniper did not have justification to fire the shot based on his previous experience as a cop. According to the report that the teen was facing the opposite direction from where negotiators were outside the home and the weapon broke the glass that officers thought was a gunshot. Obviously, there is a major difference between a shot from a .357 and broken glass. The investigation from the sheriff’s county states the sniper was not in the wrong but is this police abuse?
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Fresno City Council delays police mediation-plan vote - Fresno Bee

Fresno City Council delays police mediation-plan voteFresno BeeA plan to settle disputes between Fresno police officers and the public is causing friction at City Hall.
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NYPD Officer Charged With Trying to Kidnap and Cook 100 Women [Updated]

NYPD Officer Charged With Trying to Kidnap and Cook 100 Women [Updated] | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Yes, cook....
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Chris Castillo-Romo's comment, November 3, 2012 10:45 PM
With three years on the force, I'd be interested in hearing what his coworkers would have to say about Valle. He obviously ended up employed by the NYPD, so maybe these interests developed afterwards? If not, then I agree with the comments above; the candidate evaluations aren't exactly as complete as I think most people, especially now, would like them to be.
To further complicate things, Valle's attorney is defending him on the basis that it was all an online fantasy. I doubt that'll fly in court, but regardless, it raises the question of how much the personal lives of officers should play into the hiring process? I'd imagine that contexts like understaffing would also help shape that issue.
While we're panning back a little from the main attraction here, I can't help but wonder how many other officers, NYPD or otherwise, are not above using the NCID and surveillance resources at their disposal for their own means, from well-intentioned but technically abusive policework, to less noble purposes, like Mr. Valle's little grocery-shopping stint here.
It seems as though any system that might help prevent the problem would unfortunately also end up becoming an obstacle in genuine policework. :/
Lindsey Giacomelli's comment, November 25, 2012 10:34 PM
This is GROSS! How the heck did this guy pass all the test to work for NYPD? This is corruption is a whole different way. He is using information from the police department to practically stock these girls. I hope this causes NYPD to look a little more closely at who they are hiring and a better taps on their officers. I wonder how this guy acted around other cops? This really just creeps me out!!!
biggamevince's comment, December 12, 2012 6:11 PM
Police officer Gilberto Valle III was arrested for plotting to kidnap and cook as many as 100 women. He showed signs of police corruption by using law enforcement databases and kept files, including photos and addresses, for potential victims. He allegedly got very specific in online conversations with a co-conspirator about his urges to rape and torture. This guy has shown clear signs of psychological problems which was leading to police abuse. During his evaluation process, the hiring managers clearly misread the report.
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Could drug decriminalization save Brazil's slums? - Washington Post (blog)

Could drug decriminalization save Brazil's slums? - Washington Post (blog) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Could drug decriminalization save Brazil's slums?Washington Post (blog)Brazil has been struggling with drug violence for years.
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Maria Osornio's comment, October 27, 2012 10:14 PM
I believe the four-point plan to decriminalize all drugs would benefit the majority of poor to low-income families, since a higher percentage of drug offenders fall into this category. By instilling this plan, the rate of offenders will go down and therefore the financial burden on the government will also go down. Since this type of program is already successful in Portugal, Brazil and other countries should follow. Too many offenders are filling up the jails and prisons for crimes that could be cared for outside of these institutions. Why is it that governments punish those that commit a crime regarding marijuana, yet smoking and drinking are not considered crimes? We know for a fact both cause deaths!
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Homeland Security to recruit from US universities - The Hill

Homeland Security to recruit from US universities - The Hill | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Weekly Standard (blog)Homeland Security to recruit from US universitiesThe HillNapolitano unveiled the “Secretary's Honors Program” at a meeting of educators with the Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council on Wednesday geared toward...
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Chicago doesn't discipline rogue cops, scholar testifies in bar beating trial - Chicago Tribune

Chicago doesn't discipline rogue cops, scholar testifies in bar beating trial - Chicago Tribune | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Chicago TribuneChicago doesn't discipline rogue cops, scholar testifies in bar beating trialChicago TribuneThe Chicago Police Department doesn't pursue officers accused of excessive force as aggressively as other large departments, an expert...
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biggamevince's comment, December 12, 2012 6:37 PM
After a day of heavy drinking, an officer beat a local bartender after she tried to stop him from coming behind the bar. Initially the officer was charged with only a misdemeanor, so the lawyers on the bartender’s behalf released the video from the bar's security cameras. The violent footage went viral and led to a firestorm of criticism for the department. The officers upgraded the charges to felonies, which later got the officer fired. The Chicago Police Department does not pursue officers accused of excessive force as aggressively as other large departments. Their reports average less than other cities which is an issue. The factors are contributed to a “code of silence” within the department so the corruption does not get reported so it is hard to investigate how much corruption and abuse actually happens until it is on the news like this incident
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Police Commissioner candidate resigns after funding mystery

Police Commissioner candidate resigns after funding mystery | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A prospective Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) whose campaign was apparently bankrolled by a right-wing US think-tank has pulled out of the race, claiming he is now tens of thousands of pounds out of pocket after the expected money failed to...
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Brazilian Indigenous tribe denies mass suicide reports, says it plans mass resistance | APTN National News

Brazilian Indigenous tribe denies mass suicide reports, says it plans mass resistance | APTN National News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
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L.A. County would release low-level inmates awaiting trial to ease jail crowding - LA Daily News

With jails bursting at the seams, Los Angeles County justice and public safety officials are seriously considering a gradual release of potentially thousands of low-level inmates - mostly those awaiting trial on petty theft and drug charges -...
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Maria Osornio's comment, October 27, 2012 9:41 PM
I understand why some would fear releasing these low-level individuals out into the community. Yet, as the article states, they will not be releasing dangerous criminals. Although, I can sympathize with Ms. Chavez and the death of her daughter, we can no longer fill the jails with defendants that can probably be justifiably restored into an honorable citizen or at least attempt. How can we just lock them up and throw away the key with each defendant? One cannot determine whether a person will become a murder by one single offense. As for signing them up into the military, wouldn’t there be a higher percentage of low to middle class offenders joining compared to rich offenders? This is already the case! Maybe giving the option would be reasonable but not requiring them to sign up into the military.
Rob Duke's comment, October 28, 2012 12:48 AM
It's gotta be better than the old system of driving them around L.A. in buses. This really was the system of easing overcrowding in the L.A. jail system. Inmates slept and ate in shifts including one shift occupied with the busing program.
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Police Stop and Frisk rap artist St.Laz Again !

2 undercover NYPD officers stop and frisk rap artist St.Laz as he left a relative's building with his friend and music partner Opium. When they asked the off... (Police Stop and Frisk rap artist St.Laz and @Opiumpf Again !
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Brad Pitt Blasts U.S. 'War On Drugs,' Calls For Policy Rethink

Brad Pitt Blasts U.S. 'War On Drugs,' Calls For Policy Rethink | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Brad Pitt has thrown his weight behind a documentary that blasts America's 40-year war on drugs as a failure, calling policies that imprison huge numbers of drug-users a "charade" in urgent (Brad Pitt Blasts U.S.'War On Drugs,' Calls For Policy Rethink...
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Benjamin Russell's comment, October 22, 2012 12:30 AM
The war on drugs definitely has its issues and glitches within the system. I would definitely say it hasn't been upheld and enforced as much as it should be. The War on Drugs is one of those things where its either all in or all out, we can't just kind of enforce it, which is what we are doing. As far as Brad Pitt goes, I could really care less what a Hollywood performer has to say about anything regarding our country.
Morgan Hostina's comment, October 29, 2012 10:35 PM
Personally, I think it’s great when people in traditional power positions question the institutions that seemingly benefit them, like Warren Buffet. I know that their opinion matters little in and of itself, but I feel like maybe it may inspire political change, or at least awareness to an extent. As for the War On Drugs; I find hard drugs, cocaine, methamphetamine, ecstasy, speed and the like repulsive. They are incredibly destructive to the user and the trade is regularly violent and destructive to communities on so many levels, not to mention a legitimate National Security threat on the borders. I feel that they should never be legalized on the grounds of how physically destructive they are, but if all drugs were legalized, you would probably weaken the cartels power significantly and reduce illegal drug trafficking. If you use bootlegging during prohibition as an example, while bootlegging and illegal moonshine still exist, it is a tiny percent of what would have been a million dollar business if that were in today’s currency. The temptations of selling drugs are massive. The going rate for so many of the hard drugs is incredibly high, and if you happen to have an expensive lifestyle, aka users, then it’s the perfect way to pay for it.
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FBI secretly creates Internet police — RT

FBI secretly creates Internet police — RT | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The FBI was rather public with its recent demands for backdoor access to websites and Internet services across the board, but as the agency awaits those secret surveillance powers, they're working on their own end to have those e-spy capabilities.
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Benjamin Russell's comment, October 27, 2012 6:27 PM
As technology continues to advance and more and more transactions, discussions, and other business occurs more and more online, law enforcement must adapt. It is great to see law enforcement focus their efforts online, as criminals begin to use online tools more and more. Though it can feel violating to feel like you could be being watched as you search the web at home, if you are not breaking the law you have nothing to worry about. I think it is also good for people to realize law enforcement's increased efforts online so that criminals feel more discouraged.
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Portland, USDOJ agreement includes more oversight of police

Portland, USDOJ agreement includes more oversight of police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The city of Portland has reached a proposed settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice on police reforms in the wake of an investigation that found officers too frequently use excessive force against the mentally ill.
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Lori Jo's comment, October 29, 2012 1:11 AM
More oversight, additional training, and revision of the use of stun guns. Sounds like Portland is really supporting their police department. Probably a good thing, considering the PPD engaged in a “pattern or practice of excessive force when dealing with the mentally ill.” Whoa. I really feel like more training would be beneficial asap
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Police Fire Rubber Bullets at Striking South Africa Miners

Police Fire Rubber Bullets at Striking South Africa Miners | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Anglo American Platinum has agreed to reinstate workers let go for staging illegal strikes, but not to wage demands.
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Police teargas Chilean youth demanding education (VIDEO) — RT

Police teargas Chilean youth demanding education (VIDEO) — RT | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Students clashed with police on the streets of the Chilean capital ahead of this weekend's municipal election, as protesters vent their anger over the government’s inability to respond to demands for education reform.
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New Yorkers Testify Against Stop-and-Frisk at Brooklyn College ...

New Yorkers Testify Against Stop-and-Frisk at Brooklyn College ... | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Calls made for passing of the Community Safety Act — legislation designed to combat discrimination in policing.
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Police chief quits over Hillsborough tragedy role - New Zealand Herald

Police chief quits over Hillsborough tragedy role - New Zealand Herald | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The GuardianPolice chief quits over Hillsborough tragedy roleNew Zealand HeraldNorman Bettison quit as chief constable of West Yorkshire Police ahead of a meeting which was to consider his role in the investigation into the tragedy in which 96...
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Manitoba First Nations communities demand police service - CTV News

Manitoba First Nations communities demand police service - CTV News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
CTV NewsManitoba First Nations communities demand police serviceCTV NewsThe residents of remote First Nations communities in Northern Manitoba say they must tackle drugs, gangs and domestic violence on their own because the provincial and federal...
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When the Cops Disappear: A Case Study in Central California

Pensions are just a tiny part of this problem--even cities who did not subscribe to the Public Employee Retirement System have had massive law enforcement (and other general government service employees) Reduction In Force (RIFs). Tax policy and ballot box public policy is the problem in California (see my explanation in other posts in this scoop.it blog). In Huron (near Fresno), where I was Chief of Police, we lost half our revenue and half our police force between 2008 and 2010 and we were so poor that we did not have PERS retirement. The poem is snarkish in other respects, but it's just plain misleading in regards to the source of the problem.
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TSA Responds To Security Criticism By Telling People To Remember 9/11 Attacks - CBS Connecticut

TSA Responds To Security Criticism By Telling People To Remember 9/11 Attacks - CBS Connecticut | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Transportation Security Administration has started to respond to wide criticism of its operations in a more aggressive manner.
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Benjamin Russell's comment, October 27, 2012 6:45 PM
I totally agree with Farbstein and the rest of the TSA officials that responded to the security criticism. The basic requirements of TSA while going through security are simple and all people are informed of the procedures well in advanced in order to make the process go as smooth as possible. I do think that TSA could, at times, be more kind with passengers and treat them with more respect, however all passengers must searched thoroughly so we don't allow another tragedy.
Morgan Hostina's comment, October 29, 2012 10:21 PM
I definitely agree with Lori and Benjamin on this one. It drives me a little nuts when I hear people calling the TSA Nazis or claim that their rights are being violated. I understand that the security is unpleasant sometimes, but we chose that for a very good reason. Nearly 3000 people died on September 11th because we let hijakers get on planes with box cutters. Not some high-tech ceramic weapons or explosives, box cutters; That kind of sums up the argument that searches need to be fairly thorough, and for items that some people might not initially consider weapons. While I would become rabid if this practice was performed say, on the road system, or like in the NYPD’s stop and frisk, as Benjamin said; there isn’t a single person who isn’t aware of the level of scrutiny that they are expected to cooperate with, and they don’t have to use the air system if they don’t want to. Sometimes I think people aren’t aware that “rights” aren’t absolute. The first amendment doesn’t protect your right to yell fire in a crowded theater, and likewise, in a high security risk area, your right to privacy is lessened. This goes for airports, border check points and other types of government complexes alike. If it is sensitive and there is the possibility that great harm could occur by allowing an armed person through, then a search is fairly reasonable.
Chris Castillo-Romo's comment, November 3, 2012 11:02 PM
I agree with the points presented above on a personal level; at this point I've just accepted the procedures as minor annoyances that don't quite outweigh the convenience that flying presents. That said, however, I can't help but think of the news stories that came out about a month or two ago about undercover government agents being able to successfully sneak weapons past TSA screening. I guess it bothers me that the justification given for TSA procedures is that it will prevent the proverbial sequel to 9/11, but unfortunately, I've yet to come across conclusive evidence that our blue-shirted friends can do just that.
As far as the article itself is concerned, I feel both Dimond and Farbstein are being hyperbolic to their own credibility's detriment. The difference, of course, is that Farbstein is speaking out as an official of the TSA and her position leaves much to be desired on a professional level. I guess that's where the opinions of the other 43% of Americans on that Gallup poll come from.
The last point seemed too underdiscussed for my liking. It would be interesting to find out exactly why the country is spending more on security services that were already in place before 9/11 for cheaper.
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UN sides with law enforcement over data retention | ZDNet

UN sides with law enforcement over data retention | ZDNet | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Summary: The United Nations has picked a side when it comes to the ongoing debate over data-retention legislation, echoing sentiments by law-enforcement organisations that a retention scheme is necessary.
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Meet The 17-Year-Old Who Blew The Lid Off Racial Profiling With His iPod

Meet The 17-Year-Old Who Blew The Lid Off Racial Profiling With His iPod | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"We're going to go out there and violate some rights." NYPD police recordings..
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Maria Osornio's comment, October 27, 2012 10:41 PM
Stop and frisk program and racial profiling goes hand in hand. In the video, they mention how there is a high percentage of latinos and blacks stopped and frisked over any other race. It disgusts me to hear those officers giving this young man hell just because of how he looks. There was no professionalism shown by these officers. I highly recommend constant retraining in this matter if stop and frisk program will be used. Unfortunately, what I heard on this video is that is wasn’t coming from the new police recruits but from those veterans in the force. How can anything change if they have supervisors that are forcing other officers to engage in violating rights?
Morgan Hostina's comment, October 29, 2012 10:09 PM
The Stop and Frisk policy has always blown my mind. What I learned in both of my procedural law classes, is that in order to be detained, even temporarily, aka an investigatory stop, is that the officer have reasonable suspicion. As far as I can tell, especially since I have seen this article, if you happen to be in the wrong neighborhood and of a non-white persuasion you will likely be stopped. Thats not reasonable suspicion, thats not anything. Furthermore, inorder to perform a search/frisk, you have to have reasonable suspicion. The exception is officer safety, but how can you possibly claim that for stops that are a matter of policy and not for violations. Can the supreme court get off its ass and find this unconstitutional and criminal? There are plenty of ways to combat crime in bad neighborhoods, that generally means increasing patrols and getting to know the residents. Furthermore, police can follow you and talk to you all they want, no level of suspicion required. Why dont they just do that? (Frothingatthemouth.) Lastly, quotas are the worst thing you could ever possibly choose to use.
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The Hunted and the Hated: An Inside Look at the NYPD's Stop-and-Frisk Policy

The Hunted and the Hated: An Inside Look at the NYPD's Stop-and-Frisk Policy: http://t.co/RTiFPY7r...
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Lori Jo's comment, October 24, 2012 11:24 PM
"We are not for no policing, we are for better policing." I truly believe this is the best way I've heard it come from a rational argument the entire time I've been researching the Stop-and-Frisk controversy. Nobody should live in fear of those that are supposed to protect them. I'm glad to see that there were so many in that small community willing to step forward and testify to the mistreatment they have received at the hands of the NYPD's policy. It's not to say that Every officer in the department is aggressively racially profiling during the stop and frisks, but enough of them are to make a significant impact on the community. They seem to be regressing out of community policing into a former state where it felt the police were always against the common citizen.
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Feds not changing marijuana policy, even if 3 states legalize it, US official says

Feds not changing marijuana policy, even if 3 states legalize it, US official says | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES - A top Justice Department official has said in a television interview that the federal government is ready to combat any (RT @robinsax: The hypocrisy...Feds not changing marijuana policy, even if 3 states legalize it, US official says...
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Benjamin Russell's comment, October 22, 2012 12:36 AM
This issue confuses me very much, and it continues to be more and more of an issue as time goes on. The federal government is receiving more and more pressure as more and more states attempt to legalize marijuana for recreation and/or medicinal purposes. I am aware of the amendments and the idea of individual state liberties; however, I just don't understand how a state can legalize marijuana by state law and it still be considered illegal according to national law. I don't understand why states would even push for the legalization of marijuana because the feds will just come in a raid these places afterwards. Sounds pointless from the states point of view to even try.
Lori Jo's comment, October 24, 2012 11:06 PM
How can the Feds claim to go after marijuana if it is legalized in those states? If states are willing to vote on something that is federally outlawed, shouldn't that be a sign that, perhaps times are changing and perhaps the feds should take note. I still cant believe that Feds raid state regulated medical marijuana shops either. How can it be legal at a state level, but not federally?
Rob Duke's comment, October 25, 2012 12:01 AM
It'll be interesting to see if policy changes after the election....