Police Problems and Policy
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Softly does it

Softly does it | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
HOW many rankings of global power have put Britain at the top and China at the bottom? Not many, at least this century. But on July 14th an index of “soft...
Rob Duke's insight:

U.S. at no. 3.  Something that the police should note and up our soft power index.

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Important evidence almost fills video storage system for Pueblo police

Important evidence almost fills video storage system for Pueblo police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
More than 43,000 videos are occupying about two-thirds of storage space on the system.
Rob Duke's insight:

Yeah, this is one of the problems that Chiefs have been worried about with body cameras.  If you don't keep it all, someone will claim that you intentionally deleted something...so, where do you come up with the Terrabytes to store it all....?

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The Confusing Science of Stoned Driving | VICE | United States

The Confusing Science of Stoned Driving | VICE | United States | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

The trick, when it comes to marijuana and driving, involves determining what exactly “dangerously impaired” means. Ask a few average all-American, pot-smoking teenagers, and they'll likely say there's no such thing. A recent survey conducted by insurance giant Liberty Mutual, for example, found that among teens who admitted to driving after consuming cannabis, more than 70 percent self-reported no negative effects whatsoever on their competence behind the wheel, including 34 percent who believed, however dubiously, that getting blazed was actually performance enhancing.

Meanwhile, at least ten states mandate severe penalties for any trace of THC in a roadside drug test, even inactive metabolites that remain detectable up to a month after use.

Rob Duke's insight:

We need to charge under the old "impairment" section of the DUI code and go back to performing thorough Field Sobriety Tests (FST's).  FST's have taken a real hit in terms of officers being thorough since the advent of .08, Admin per se (where folks must submit to a test or lose their license), and the introduction of the portable breathalyzer.  Let's face it, we just don't do FST's like we once did...time to go back to the old practice.

 

If someone is impaired by THC/Cannabis, then we should arrest; but, not otherwise.

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Jeffrey Evan's curator insight, July 26, 2015 10:59 PM

If it alters your mood, mind, behavior and you are behind a wheel you should be arrested for driving under the influence (DUI).  Anything that alters your behavior and you make the rational choice to get behind the wheel of a vehicle it quickly raises the risks for a recipe for disaster.  It really depends on the user how they act while under the influence but they are under the influence, which should be illegal.  It is only fair.

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People Offer Better Ideas When They Can’t See What Others Suggest

People Offer Better Ideas When They Can’t See What Others Suggest | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Research suggests limits should be placed on open innovation.
Rob Duke's insight:

People make better suggestions when they can't see the ideas put forth by others.  This has positive implications for the use of tools like the Crawford Slip Method.

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Why cops don't 'shoot to injure'

Why cops don't 'shoot to injure' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Developing this level of marksmanship skill would require many more hours of training than cops presently receive, and would require many more hours to maintain. Many cops never receive any marksmanship training after they leave the academy. They are required to shoot a standard course of fire of 25-50 rounds, as little as once a year (although quarterly is probably more standard). Ammunition is expensive, and there is seldom ammunition available for practice. There is even less money available to pay officers to practice. Some cops would practice on their own (and some do), but you have to remember that this is, in the end, a job. You expect to get paid when you're doing work for someone, and cops do, too.
Rob Duke's insight:

That's most of it, but there's an ethical dilemma also: do we require cops to sacrifice their high order utilities (e.g. life, health, happiness) for an offender's low order utility (e.g. hedonism, selfishness, etc.)?

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max mckernan's comment, July 24, 2015 11:39 PM
this is a very interesting piece i think that the artical brings up very good points because the main issue is that it takes a lot of training for anyone to preform that consistently under those conditions. however the flip side of this is maybe police should be subject to this kind of training so that police hit their mark every time.
Rob Duke's comment, July 25, 2015 12:53 PM
Max: I was a range-master for a couple years, so I had access to an indoor range and all the ammo I could shoot. I put a couple hundred rounds a month through my S&W 4508 (I mention the model because it's not the smoothest gun, but it is reliable). Despite this respectable amount of training and the fact that I could shoot the "eye out of a fly" (yes, I'm exaggerating), but add the stress and chaos of a real shooting, movement, distractions, etc. and I was never able to demonstrate the level of expertise that I had on the range in the field (i.e. one shooting: I put 8 rounds into a moving car and didn't hit the suspect; another shooting: I shot low, putting suspect down only through the luck of hitting him with gravel...yeah, I meant to do that...). So, I guess what I'm saying is that I'm not sure that lots more training would be the cure either. It's imperfect when the poo hits the fan. On the other hand, more training can't hurt, either.
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Courthouse News Service

Courthouse News Service | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Calexico Police Department has been wracked with turmoil for months. Interim Police Chief Michael Bostic, the lead defendant, was appointed in October 2014. He promptly compared his predecessor, some of his officers and some city officials to the Mafia.
     "The council members in conjunction with the police officers association and members of that association have used city funds and city resources to run what I would call an extortion racket," Bostic said in November. "I've literally had it."
     Bostic claimed, among other things, that elected officials and members of the police union were using publicly funded surveillance equipment to follow other members of city government. He asked the FBI to investigate just two weeks after he moved into his new job.
Rob Duke's insight:

Who do you believe?  The officers claim the City Council, City Manager, and interim Chief are corrupt and the new Chief claims it's the officers who are out of control.

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Los Angeles police officer sentenced to 16 months in jail for striking a woman who later died

A veteran Los Angeles police officer has been sentenced to 16 months in jail for kicking and striking a handcuffed woman who later died.

Fifty-year-old Mary O'Callaghan was sentenced Thursday to the maximum three years in jail, but the judge suspended the last 20 months of her term.

O'Callaghan was found guilty of assault under color of authority during the arrest of 35-year-old Alesia Thomas in 2012.

A dashboard camera recorded O'Callaghan kicking Thomas in the groin, abdomen and upper thigh, and jabbing her in the throat.

Thomas, who lost consciousness in the patrol car, was pronounced dead at a hospital.

O'Callaghan was not charged in connection with the death. An autopsy found Thomas had cocaine in her system, but the cause of death was listed as undetermined.
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What I Learned Being the Daughter Of Police Officers

What I Learned Being the Daughter Of Police Officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
I’ve spent more than my fair share of time in police stations. Not because I’m a career criminal, but because my mother, father and stepfather are all (now retired) police officers. When I tell people this, they usually react by saying something like, “Oh wow, that sucks.You must not be allowed to do anything.” No, my parents did not raise me in a bubble, in fact, quite the contrary was true. My parents actually have given me quite a bit of independence throughout my entire life. I believe this has to do with the fact that my parents are confident they have taught me everything I need to know in order to make the proper decisions (and that when I make the wrong decisions, they won’t be life-changing).

Don’t get me wrong, there were plenty of times I blamed my parents’ profession for not being about to go certain places or stay out past a certain time. But now I’m old enough to appreciate all of that and to thank them for everything they taught me because it made me the person I am today. So, I thought I’d share my knowledge with the world by compiling a list of the most important things my law enforcement parents have taught me over the years.
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"How does it feel??": Man holds sign at scene of shooting of a police officer

"How does it feel??": Man holds sign at scene of shooting of a police officer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Rob Duke's insight:

I'm retired for a reason.  It's no longer my day to watch people do terrible things to one another.

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Police camp gives kids new perspective about officers

Police camp gives kids new perspective about officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
COMMERCE CITY, Colo. -- A penny of prevention is worth a pound of cure. That’s the simple idea behind the Commerce City Police Camp for kids. Forty-six kids, ranging from 11 to 15 years old, are st...
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Ex-sheriff's deputy indicted after child severely burned in raid

The indictment charges former Habersham County deputy Nikki Autry, 29, with providing false information to a judge in order to obtain a search warrant for the raid, the U.S. Attorney’s office for the Northern District of Georgia said.

“Without her false statements, there was no probable cause to search the premises for drugs or to make the arrest,” acting U.S. Attorney John Horn said in a statement. “And in this case, the consequences of the unlawful search were tragic.”

The toddler, Bounkham Phonesavanh, was asleep in his playpen during a “no knock" raid in May 2014 to arrest a suspect that police said had sold methamphetamine to an informant.

But prosecutors say Autry knew that no one in the residence had purchased the drugs from a police informant and did not confirm that many people were coming and going from the home.

The suspect, a relative of the child, was not in the house during the raid but was later arrested nearby, police have said.
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How The NYPD Abused Citizens In The Name Of Data, And How One Cop Exposed It

How The NYPD Abused Citizens In The Name Of Data, And How One Cop Exposed It | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Exposing police misconduct can be risky, even for a cop. “Crime By The Numbers,” a short documentary directed by Don Argott for FiveThirtyEight and ESPN Films’ Signals series, tells the story of Ad…
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You Make The Call. Excessive Force Or Justified? Can You Say Lawsuit! - MR. DEMOCRATIC

You Make The Call. Excessive Force Or Justified? Can You Say Lawsuit! - MR. DEMOCRATIC | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
You Make The Call. Excessive Force Or Justified? Can You Say Lawsuit! Nearly two years after Rhonda Wells was injured at the Dallas County Jail.
Rob Duke's insight:

The Jailer was likely taught this behavior.  I always told my prisoners that the rules were different in jail because the officers had no weapons, so when they tell you where to walk, do it.  When they tell you to sit, do it immediately.  Mind you, I wasn't debating whether it was right or wrong (judge for yourself in this graphic video), but was just trying to give my arrestees some good advice for how to stay out of trouble in the jail.

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Cop On Patrol Decides To Ram Driver's Truck, Now He's Hailed A Hero For It

Cop On Patrol Decides To Ram Driver's Truck, Now He's Hailed A Hero For It | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
With lives on the line, Bertrand pulled a “quick-thinking maneuver,” ramming his 2000-pound patrol car into the out-of-control UPS truck. Bertrand later explained, “I didn’t have any other options but to ram my vehicle into his vehicle.” However, there was some apprehension that crossed his mind. Bertrand remembered, “I thought, ‘Boy you better get this right because the old man is gonna be pretty upset about me wrecking one of our cars.'”
Rob Duke's insight:

LOL.  The "old man" is what we tend to call the Chief or Sheriff.  If it's a woman, we don't say the "old lady", I don't know why for the inconsistency....I think "old man" is a military thing...

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Chicago's independent police review – not so independent?

Chicago's independent police review – not so independent? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Two former investigators on Chicago's Independent Police Review Authority say they were not able to independently do their job and follow the facts where those facts led when pursuing cases of police misconduct.
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Dashcam footage clearly shows the real reason Sandra Bland changed lanes in the first place

Dashcam footage clearly shows the real reason Sandra Bland changed lanes in the first place | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Upon analysis, it quickly confirms something Bland herself states later to the officer—the only reason she changed lanes, which the officer claimed was his rationale for pulling her over, was so that she could get out of the way for his patrol car.

As you will see below, when Sandra Bland turns onto University Drive, she gets a significant distance away from Officer Encinia, who was driving in the opposite direction, but made a sudden U-turn and mashed on the gas to catch up to Bland's vehicle. His speed is evident as he barrels down the road, which has a speed limit of 20 mph.
Rob Duke's insight:

It's hard to argue that this wasn't a pre-text stop....

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DERRICK NELSON's comment, July 26, 2015 7:32 PM
From the footage being shown it was a legitimate stop for improper lane change. However, there was no reason for the officer to gain entry into said car to pull out the traffic offender (Sandra Bland). Sandra should've still performed a proper lane signaling as she was getting out of the way of the patrol car to let the officer go by. Officer Encinia used unnecessary force resulting in his corrupt behavior.
Jeffrey Evan's curator insight, July 26, 2015 10:54 PM

I personally think there has to be another reason that the police officer pulled the driver over.  It is hard to analyze video footage, especially if there is not any audio for majority of the footage.  She could have been looking at a phone, or texting, calling.  That could be the reason the driver did not use a turn signal to switch lanes.

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Here Are All the Police Killings by State in 2015 So Far, in One Shocking Map

Here Are All the Police Killings by State in 2015 So Far, in One Shocking Map | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Numbers don't lie.
Rob Duke's insight:

Alaska vs. California--looks bad, but proportionally about right given the population differences.  Our 2 for 700,000 pop. is proportional for a population of 33M for 95 deaths.  California's population is 38M.

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DERRICK NELSON's comment, July 26, 2015 9:06 PM
Bad discretion decision making by police when shooting offenders needs to stop. Police reform policy is needed now! A lot of these shootings are racial motivated and not felony crime encouraged. People killing people isn't the way to a more peaceful world.
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Austin police de-escalation training extends beyond academy

Austin police de-escalation training extends beyond academy | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“The state has minimum standards for what an officer needs in order to become commissioned and we go well beyond those standards. A lot of that does deal with interacting with the community,” said Sgt. Jim Beck with Austin Police Training Academy. “We have members of the community that come in and interact with the cadets.”

Sgt. Jim Beck Beck focuses on training APD officers after they complete the academy.

“We have a tactical communication and de-escalation course that officers are allowed to take. We have a lot of leadership and ethics type courses that are available and it’s a continous process. I mean, once you become commissioned it’s a never-ending learning cycle,” said Sgt. Beck.
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Police Pursuits on the Rise in LA

Police Pursuits on the Rise in LA | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Car chases are something of a common sight on Southern California roads, with drivers trying to outrun police on freeways, surface streets and even across the desert sands.
In Los Angeles County, there were more than 1,200 in 2014 alone - that’s more than three chases each and every day.
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Being Arrested Is Nearly Twice As Deadly For African-Americans As Whites

Being Arrested Is Nearly Twice As Deadly For African-Americans As Whites | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Among whites, African-Americans and Hispanics being held in local jails, African-Americans are the least likely to commit suicide.2 Instead, illnesses — and heart disease, in particular — are the most common causes of deaths for black inmates while in custody.3 White inmates are five times as likely to commit suicide in jail as blacks.
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Texas corrections officer killed by inmate had survived house explosion

Texas corrections officer killed by inmate had survived house explosion | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Deputy Criminal Chief Assistant U.S. Attorney Rick Calvert, who in his previous role as a Potter County district attorney prosecuted Tracy, characterized Tracy as "the most violent and dangerous defendant I have ever prosecuted, and I've prosecuted thousands of defendants -- literally."

Calvert, based in the federal agency's Dallas office, said Tracy "routinely assaulted guards" in jail and had openly stated he would kill a guard if he got the chance.
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AUDIO: Hayward police dispatch recording in deadly officer-involved shooting

AUDIO: Hayward police dispatch recording in deadly officer-involved shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A public police dispatch recording of Wednesday morning's officer-involved shooting captures the frightening moments a routine traffic stop …
Rob Duke's insight:

Audio of the Hayward Sergeant murder.

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Tampa police, housing authority joining forces to patrol crime hotspots

Tampa police, housing authority joining forces to patrol crime hotspots | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
TAMPA — Police have said that more officers will be out patrolling the city’s troubled neighborhoods to help deal with the spike in violent crime this year.
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Hayward police sergeant killed during traffic stop

Hayward police sergeant killed during traffic stop | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Several law enforcement agencies are on scene investigating an incident.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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St. Louis police district captain takes community policing to the streets

St. Louis police district captain takes community policing to the streets | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
ST. LOUIS (KPLR) – Shootings and homicides have risen in St. Louis city during the first half of 2015. Homicides in the city stand at 106 victims. Captain John Hayden from the St. Louis police depa...
Rob Duke's insight:

This is great.  It's all about being accessible.  If we're sitting behind our desks in the depths of the police station, folks don't have any idea how to access us.

I sat every day for about 90 minutes in a different public location (restaurants, public library, etc.).  I took my laptop and worked, but citizens knew they could "bump" into me and talk about whatever....

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