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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Michigan Governor Signs Bill That Allows Private Prison With Troubled History To Reopen

Michigan Governor Signs Bill That Allows Private Prison With Troubled History To Reopen | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Gov. Rick Snyder (R) signed a bill this week that authorizes Michigan to contract with private prison operators, and to re-open a now-vacant state facility run by a corporation that has been accused of enabling juvenile abuse, deaths, and riots at...

Via Darcy Delaproser
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TSA is ditching body scanners

Those airport scanners with their all-too-revealing body images will soon be going away.
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Diana Dillard's comment, January 27, 2013 5:49 PM
Great! If being seen naked by complete strangers isn't a violation of privacy I don't know what is.
Ashley Roberts's comment, January 30, 2013 11:11 PM
Getting rid of those machines will help ease the mind of those who travel frequently. Traveling can usually be stressful without that fear of feeling violated. I know many people who avoid traveling due to it being such a hassle and feeling uncomfortable. If there are other ways as efficient, then I think those are the ones that should be used in order to create more relaxing and less anxious environment.
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Ex-Mayor of New Orleans Ray Nagin Indicted

Ex-Mayor of New Orleans Ray Nagin Indicted | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Ray Nagin, the ex-mayor of New Orleans, has faced a series of charges including fraud, bribery, filing false tax returns and money laundering. So far two former city officials and two businessmen h...
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Willow Weir's comment, January 22, 2013 2:57 PM
I think it is interesting the HBO show "treme" was based on the aftermath of New Orleans and the mayor was taking bribes in a similar fashion. So art imitating life or ?
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Madison Co. Sheriff: Gun Control Laws That Violate Constitution Won’t Be Enforced

Madison Co. Sheriff: Gun Control Laws That Violate Constitution Won’t Be Enforced | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
HUNTSVILLE, Ala.(WHNT) – A sweeping set of gun control proposals laid out by President Obama on Wednesday is adding more... (Madison Co.
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Interesting.  I often argue that "Jim Crow" could not have existed for as long as it did if small county sheriffs had just said "no, I won't enforce that!", but what about this policy?

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Robert Tompkins's comment, January 22, 2013 7:38 PM
I am an advocate of the second amendment. I dont believe that it was written for hunting or even protection from your neighbor. It was set up so that the people would not be fearful of their own government. If we allow the government to dictate what guns we have and to disallow guns then we have no way of defending ourselves should it be neccesary against the government. I believe that public servents such as this one are doing the right thing. They are there to give their interpritations of the law and to follow it the best way that they can.
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GRPD Explains Community Policing on Southeast Side

GRPD Explains Community Policing on Southeast Side | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. – Officer Adam Baylis works in what’s been one of the city’s most troubled areas, the southeast side.
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Brandon Barnes's comment, January 21, 2013 1:33 AM
It seems to be a good approach to policing, gaining trust from the witnesses or possible future witnesses to crime would definitely seem to aid in catching criminals. Knowing the area and what it's normally like can always help in being able to notice when something is out of place.
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Indiana state senator files marijuana decriminalization bill

Indiana state senator files marijuana decriminalization bill | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An Indiana state senator has introduced a bill reducing the penalties for possession of marijuana.
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Robert Tompkins's comment, January 22, 2013 7:41 PM
I believe with the recent turn of events with some states moving to legalize marijuana that the U.S government should re examine the reason that they have made the drug illegal. There is little reason that it is still on the controlled substance list. There are many benefiets of making marijuana legal. Tax it such as cigarettes and alcohol. Also it would reduce a significant part of the war on drugs burden.
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Who Will Protect the Students From the Guards?

Who Will Protect the Students From the Guards? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
If we intensify the policing of schools without eliminating racial disparities in criminal justice, we will only intensify the burden some children are forced to bear in the name of saving others. (Who Will Protect the Students From the Guards?
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Brandon Barnes's comment, January 21, 2013 1:00 AM
This is a good point about the police and racial profiling but as far as I can tell a volunteer armed guard at a school to prevent a shooting has less to do with the racial profiling problem then the article makes it out too. The fact that there "is little evidence of armed guards preventing school shootings" stinks of complete bias, there has been many incidents where armed guards have prevented or minimized shootings, or armed off duty cops. So the ridiculous idea that was implied that an armed "good guy" would likely not be a help to an active shooter situation because the lack of evidence shows how biased and apparently "out of the loop" this author is. All this being said I think that the armed guards should have minimal rolls if any in policing the schools unless they are on duty officers in order to try and keep the schools in normal running order. Of course in emergency situations they would be there to take control of the situation, otherwise normal procedures should be taken by teachers for things such as finding marijuana on a student, then call the cops as you normally would.
Rob Duke's comment, January 21, 2013 1:59 AM
Brandon, I tend to agree that these armed guards would not be police officers because police officers are too highly trained to sit around guarding a campus. I think the author worries that more officers will catch more mischievous but illegal activity on campus and maybe label kids as criminals who might otherwise have aged out of their misbehavior.
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The current judgment big thing in the dismantling that NYPDs stop-and-frisk strategy | Brawl Music

The current judgment big thing in the dismantling that NYPDs stop-and-frisk strategy http://t.co/ipz1HThu
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Dept. of Homeland Security Forced to Release List of Keywords Used to Monitor Social Networking Sites - Forbes

Dept. of Homeland Security Forced to Release List of Keywords Used to Monitor Social Networking Sites - Forbes | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
If you are thinking about tweeting about clouds, pork, exercise or even Mexico, think again. Doing so may result in a closer look by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
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Joshua Congleton's comment, January 22, 2013 11:24 AM
I read over this article. I am a bit shocked at the number of seemingly harmless words that the government can use to "flag" you and keep an eye on you. Why is it SO bad to say "pork" or "plot"? Is it just when you use one or two of these words? Or does your account get on that "watch list" only when you use a few of these words at a time? That is a thought-provoking idea, and one that I would like an answer to. If I say "pork" on facebook, maybe I just am enjoying a summer BBQ with my family, why should I be watched? This seems a bit out of hand to me.
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158 Mexican police detained for alleged drug ties - USA TODAY

158 Mexican police detained for alleged drug ties - USA TODAY | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
158 Mexican police detained for alleged drug ties
USA TODAY
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Authorities say 158 local police officers have been detained in northern Mexico for alleged ties to organized crime.
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IAB captain busted in NYPD gal-pal assault

IAB captain busted in NYPD gal-pal assault | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An Internal Affairs captain who helped oversee the investigation into the Bronx ticket-fixing scandal was hauled off in handcuffs for allegedly beating his sergeant girlfriend into unconsciousness...
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In Rush To Pass Bill, NY Forgets To Exempt Police From Gun Laws | Gun Control | Fox Nation

In Rush To Pass Bill, NY Forgets To Exempt Police From Gun Laws  | Gun Control | Fox Nation | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Additions to be made to gun laws for law enforcementJim HofferNEW YORK (WABC) -- A troubling oversight has been found within New York State's sweeping new gun laws.The ban on

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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Brandon Barnes's comment, January 21, 2013 1:24 AM
Amazing that the politicians were foaming at the mouth so much to minumize the New York state residents second amendment rights so much that they forgot about the police. Well I can't say that that surprises me. A question that has always came to mind in these gun laws is the fact that the police and retired police in California get concealed carry permits, in New York they will be exempt from this law new & round magazine law. What doesn't really seem to be considered, maybe in some states this isn't true but none that I know of, is current and retired military. Why is it that they aren't given special consideration?
Rob Duke's comment, January 21, 2013 2:02 AM
Current and retired officers are always at risk of running into those who they put behind bars at one time. That's not the case with military personnel. I don't carry, as a rule, but I'm also retired from California so it would extraordinary for me to run into someone who had a grudge to settle.
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Justice Department seldom checking references for law-enforcement hires - Washington Post (blog)

Justice Department seldom checking references for law-enforcement hires - Washington Post (blog) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Justice Department seldom checking references for law-enforcement hires Washington Post (blog) US_Department_of_Justice The Justice Department rarely checks references for potential law-enforcement hires as recommended by official groups that...
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I find this hard to believe...

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The Prosecution of Aaron: A Response to Orin Kerr | The Public Domain |

The Prosecution of Aaron: A Response to Orin Kerr | The Public Domain | | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
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Interesting perspectives indeed--both sides.

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NYPD Cop Handcuffs Photojournalist and Deletes Video Footage of Stop-and-Frisk Detainment : Bad_Cop_No_Donut

NYPD Cop Handcuffs Photojournalist and Deletes Video Footage of Stop-and-Frisk Detainment : Bad_Cop_No_Donut | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
reddit: the front page of the internet (RT @occupyPoliceBot: [reddit] NYPD Cop Handcuffs Photojournalist and Deletes Video Footage of Stop-and-Frisk Detainment http://t.co/GNpQ98Jo)...
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Robert Tompkins's comment, January 22, 2013 7:49 PM
I feel the cop went a bit to far when he detained the photo journalist and deleted his footage. There is obvious first amendment issues here. I feel that they were right in telling him not to record the juveniles, but they could get him for posting it after the fact if that was a big issue. Also i don’t feel any government agent be it local or federal has the right to tell someone not to videotape something. That is their right and a way to keep them safe as well. The cops would love it if they were able to catch someone based on the footage, but when they are caught based on it they are not as happy. They need to realize that they are public servants working in the public and should just assume that they are being recorded at all times.
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Justice system protects sex offenders, not children, mother of abuse victim says

Justice system protects sex offenders, not children, mother of abuse victim says | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
SunNewsNetwork.ca uses video, photos, and interactive tools to cover Canada's national and international news, politics, and varying opinions.
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There's quite a bit of truth in this allegation.  Should courts care more about victims?

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Willow Weir's comment, January 22, 2013 3:02 PM
I see this as a problem with general social feeling about sex offenders. It seems that unless someone personally witnessed it then there is a level of disbelief. I'm not sure if the act itself seems so repugnant that most people want to forget it . I know personally I have seen friends ignore abuse signs or choose to just remove their child from the care of someone who they suspect of abuse rather than report it. The culture seems to support protecting the perp and think that by removing focus from the victim that it will be more healing.
LaDonna Coghill's comment, January 23, 2013 8:24 PM
I can see where the mother is coming from, this pedophile got off pretty easy for the heinous crime that was committed not even two years in jail and three years probation? If I were the mother in this situation, I too would lose faith in the system if my child were violated and then the sentence didn't fit the crime. I am glad that the child didn't have to go to trial and relive the horrific situation but still, I don't think that the offender got the punishment that was deserved. I also agree that there is judgement and stigma when it comes to sex offenders and especially those that violate young children, they are seen as evil and unable to rehabilitate so the thought of them on the street is a scary one, especially for those that parent young children.
Ixchelle Oleson's comment, January 24, 2013 1:43 PM
When I read the punishment of the pedophile I immediately became just hacked. His punishment was "...18 months in jail in addition to 139 days of time served. He was also sentenced to three years of probation." Um, is this a joke? I am not sure what "sexual act" this freak acted upon but in all honesty, it doesn't really matter to me. I feel like people don't realize what effects sexual abuse has on people, especially younger kids. The mother stated that she has seen trust issues with her daughter, a drop in grades, and not as affectionate anymore. Well, yeah this makes absolute sense, the eight year old girl should probably jump on some counseling right away so the effects do not continue. Although the young girl is not aware of what happened completely because she was blind folded and confused, I bet money that some day she will look back on this horrific event and realize something was not right with what this pedophile did and she might become a disturbed person for life if she does not receive help such as counseling. How could he this sex offender get away so easily? Sex offenders will not just do such things ONE time, there is always more. So who is next? Another kid? A woman? Like come on people, he needs a punishment not a flick on the wrist. If it was me I would sentence him to lifelong prison, and no, I do not believe that is a dramatic punishment at all. What he did was sick. I more than agree with the mother of this eight year old girl, the system needs to protect children more rather than the offender. This article really has me mind blown.
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The Inquisition: A Model For Modern Interrogators : NPR

The Inquisition: A Model For Modern Interrogators : NPR | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Inquisition revolutionized record-keeping and surveillance techniques that are still used today, says Cullen Murphy.
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Woman Receives $250,000 Because Police Hogtied Her During Pregnancy (VIDEO)

Woman Receives $250,000 Because Police Hogtied Her During Pregnancy (VIDEO) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES -- When Tamara Gaglione was stopped on the side of a freeway for talking on her cellphone, she had no idea she'd end up hogtied and lying face down in the back of a police car.
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brian mcdermott's comment, January 19, 2013 2:17 PM
What was the highway patrol thinking? I think it's great that cell phone violations are being enforced finally and I hope the trend continues. This lady made it clear when she was pulled over she was pregnant however she had no regard for the safety for herself, other drivers, and her unborn child while talking on her cell phone driving. Interesting how her pregnancy became relevant when she was eventually pulled over and detained. I honestly think that a 250k. settlement was harsher than being hog tied.
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Marijuana Policy Project plans Alaska ballot measure to decriminalize pot in 2014

Marijuana Policy Project plans Alaska ballot measure to decriminalize pot in 2014 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Alaska will be among the next several states that marijuana decriminalization supporters target in efforts to legalize recreational use.
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Marijuana Legalization – Answering Questions and Developing a Framework

Marijuana Legalization – Answering Questions and Developing a Framework | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Bringing together Liberals in British Columbia (RT @KyleHarrietha: Comprehensive: "Liberal Party of Canada (BC) releases draft policy paper on legalization of #marijuana - http://t.co/ypTCulYN | LPCBC"...
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10 Ways the Drug War Is Causing Massive Collateral Damage to Our Society

10 Ways the Drug War Is Causing Massive Collateral Damage to Our Society | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
From racial injustice to flawed foreign policy, the war on drugs causes harm on many fronts.
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Prosecution rests in Pa. inmate sex abuse trial - San Francisco Chronicle

Prosecution rests in Pa. inmate sex abuse trial - San Francisco Chronicle | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Prosecution rests in Pa. inmate sex abuse trial San Francisco Chronicle PITTSBURGH (AP) — The prosecution has rested in the trial of a fired state prison guard accused of physically and sexually abusing inmates who were gay or were serving...
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Chilean Police Fire Convicted Mapuche Killer - ABC News

Chilean Police Fire Convicted Mapuche Killer - ABC News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Chilean Police Fire Convicted Mapuche Killer ABC News Chile's national police force on Friday fired an officer convicted of killing a Mapuche activist five years ago, a death that has been cited repeatedly by the Indians as evidence that...
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DOD and Homeland Security Is Unauditable | Thought FTW

DOD and Homeland Security Is Unauditable | Thought FTW | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Along with the Pentagon, the GAO cited the Department of Homeland Security as having problems so significant that it was impossible for investigators to audit it. The DHS got a qualified audit for fiscal year 2012, and is ...
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Denny's Asks Police to Leave over Patrons' 'Discomfort with Guns'

Denny's Asks Police to Leave over Patrons' 'Discomfort with Guns' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Belleville, Illinois’ local KSDK.com is reporting that one of their local Denny’s restaurants asked a table of police detectives to leave due to “some customers’ discomfort with guns.” (RT @truckingrich: Denny's Asks Police to Leave over Patrons' ...
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It may be their right to refuse service, but it smells like discrimination to me.

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Joshua Congleton's comment, January 22, 2013 11:31 AM
I saw this article on the news a while back, and I was not happy. While I can see both sides of the argument (the officers did not have visible badges), I think that this was not about the guns, but more about the money. Once the officers said they were going to leave without paying, the restaurant suddenly wanted them to stay and enjoy their meals. Whether or not the badges are visible on these officers, it only seems logical that police officers be allowed to carry weapons on them at all times. Of course, I am not one to understand being nervous with people who have guns on their person. I jut do not understand why the other customers would complain about the guns. If anything, these men walking in were probably wearing some form of clothing to identify them as officers. They had to have been. I just think this story seems like corruption, and I do not like the way things look.