Police Problems a...
Follow
3.9K views | +16 today
 
Scooped by Rob Duke
onto Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

Cop in this video charged with a felony - CNN.com Video

A police officer is facing felony charges after allegedly pushing a woman into a jail cell causing her to hit her head.
more...
James Greer's comment, November 22, 2013 2:11 AM
Mark: I'm pretty sure that the original video of this, from several weeks ago, included her being uncooperative when they tried to take her picture/finger prints, and so they brought her back to the cell and he threw her into the cell. I'm the kinda guy that will always defend the cops in a video or scenario until I know exactly what went down and why things happened, but I think it's pretty clear this cop got fed up with a drunk female who was being belligerent and uncooperative, and so he used force on her--maybe more than intended, but he fully intended her to go into that room the hard way. I don't think the gloves should stay on with him in this scenario--he definitely should lose his job over this, at the least, having proven he doesn't have the patience for it.
Mel C's curator insight, November 22, 2013 9:48 AM

This video is very subjective and can easily go either way. It appeared as if the offender grabbed the edges of the door which would show some resistance, but the video does look bad for the cop. It is important to remember that the video clip only shows a very small and narrow part of what really happened in the police station and people should not jump to conclusions and start prosecuting the officer until all the facts are made clear. The offender was intoxicated and just arrested for DUI; some intoxicated people who have been arrested are very resistant, both verbally and physically, and there could be facts similar to this that will exonerate the officer. If there are none and the officer did cross the line then he should be held accountable.

Maria's comment, December 2, 2013 2:41 AM
Well whatever the real story is, the video looks pretty bad and puts the officer in a bad spot. Officers should take care of the offenders in their police departments or in correctional facilities and as much as I think that he probably did not want to send that woman to the hospital, he should have been more careful as to how he handles her and puts her in her cell. It does look like he went over board and I am sure he knows better.
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Urban Outfitters Hits New Low With Faux Blood-Stained Kent State Sweatshirt

Urban Outfitters Hits New Low With Faux Blood-Stained Kent State Sweatshirt | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In its endless quest to seem edgy, Urban Outfitters has gone too far once more.

The store offered a one-of-a-kind Kent State University sweatshirt splattered with red coloring for $129. The tactless garment is a clear reference to the 1970 killing...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Militarized police in America. Scranton Police disrespecting a woman and more!!! - YouTube

Bringing (connected) dude's along for a arrest warrant, seizing property without owners consent. Thats how things are done in Scranton, PA i guess they think...
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's some of those Paradoxes that you'll see in Muir's article/chapter on the "professional police" in an upcoming segment.  The more power we wield (particularly hard power), the more we are vulnerable to one of the four paradoxes of coercive power:

Paradox of Dispossession

Paradox of Detachment

Paradox of Face

Paradox of Irrationality

Here, a "relaxed" version of all the officer safety tools that save law enforcement lives when things become exigent, are construed to be irrational (and look a little silly).  You can see that the tactical guys feel like the only guys that showed up in tuxes for a little garden party.

It'd be nice to have more facts, but it seems like this might be something between neighbors that got out of hand (the comment about trespassing and cctv make me think that).  I can certainly see that this woman is pugnacious and that can make an entire neighborhood tense (though, as I said, there's not enough facts here to know the whole story).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

New Mike Brown Shooting Video May Support Claims Of Surrender

New Mike Brown Shooting Video May Support Claims Of Surrender | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A man is heard saying Mike Brown surrendered, and witnesses are seen with their hands in the air moments after the shooting.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Django Unchained Actress Accosted by LAPD After Kissing White Husband

Django Unchained Actress Accosted by LAPD After Kissing White Husband | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Danièle Watts, an African-American actress who played Coco in Django Unchained and appears as Martin Lawrence's daughter on FX's Partners, says she was handcuffed and detained on Thursday by police in Los Angeles who suspected she was a prostitute.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's one of those paradoxes that I talked about in the Black Board posts.  Citizen's call and we want to make them happy.  In this case, another citizen's rights were arguably infringed upon to do so...what do you think?  If one citizen thinks another is suspicious and they call us; and we arrive and think "hmm, this might be racist b.s." should we just move on?

more...
Shelly DeWilde's comment, Today, 2:49 AM
I don't believe that we should move if something looks suspicious and there is more than one person citizen or police officer that believes it too however if someone is racially profiling a situation and contacting the police and the police react too quickly and arbitrarily then it is a problem. I believe police should question the caller just as much as the people they are calling on if probable cause isn't substantiated.
Rob Duke's comment, Today, 3:24 AM
Shelly, I agree. I once received a call of a "suspicious black male in a white jeep with a blue stripe: opening and closing mail boxes. Yup, you guessed it--it was the mailman. Sometimes you just want to slap people for being jerks like that....
Brittany Stahle's comment, Today, 8:57 PM
I understand that there was a call made about indecent exposure and that this couple fit the profile but did they have probable cause to arrest her, because she was not doing anything wrong. I completely agree with what Shelly said in her post. When the police get calls that sound like racial profiling, there are questions that need to be asked about the situation, instead of the police rushing over to the scene.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Remembering the Real Violence in Ferguson

Remembering the Real Violence in Ferguson | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

"Violence has a geography and for this reason, geography lies at the center of discussions of violence. Within the United States a myriad of taken for granted assumptions about identity, place, power, and memory undergird the nation’s psyche.  These normative interpretations intersect with a particular kind of geographic formulation that places persons of color in general, but black men most specifically, at the center of the violent structures of the nation."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 10, 12:36 PM

This isn't merely commentary about social upheaval or some musing about the social inequities (I think we've all read a ton of those articles).  This is a geographic analysis that discusses the interactions, interconnections and implications of a social and spatial conflict between citizens and the institutions of the state.  Ferguson, MO is undoubtedly a lightning rod today and some might prefer to avoid discussing it in a classroom setting; I find that as long as we put analysis before ideology, issues such as these show students the relevance and importance of geographic principles to their lives. 


Tags: race, class, gender, place, poverty, socioeconomic.

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

When Dude-Bro Pranksters Punk the Police

When Dude-Bro Pranksters Punk the Police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Florida teens with fake beer experience two different approaches to law enforcement.
Rob Duke's insight:

In my world view, either law enforcement approach is fine.  If these guys had been drinking, then they needed the attitude adjustment.  If not, they asked for this kind of detention.  On the other hand, who among us has not pulled a stupid prank and the second cop knows how to defuse the situation so that it's not nearly as much fun; nor as funny to these guys as the first cops reaction.

P.s. Don't wear your hair long and, if you must have long hair, don't put it in a pony tail, because a bad guy can throw you around by it.  You wonder why cops wear their hair high and dry--so it can't be used against them in a fight.  The only cops that wear long hair that I know of are the Sikhs in India and, then only for religious reasons.  To avoid this situation, they have a complicated wrap that takes an hour each morning to assemble. It's a pain, but you gotta take the time to braid it and put it up on a tight bun if you don't want it to be used against you.

more...
Rob Duke's comment, September 13, 3:47 PM
I don't prohibit my cops from using profanity if it'll save a life. Telling someone to drop the f*&(ing gun is better than shooting them, but I have to agree with the author. This cop thinks she's getting street cred with these kids, but she's obviously not. A wise partner taught me this back in about 1991 when I was working SMASH. I was doing a pretty good impression of how this office acts in the video and my SMASH partner asks me afterwards: "do you find that this approach that you have works?" He then explained that the local cops where he grew up in Mexico used profanity and were impolite; in contrast the Federales never used profanity and were polite and respectful--this demanded reciprocal respect. It made sense, and, as I tried it, I found I had better success dealing with young men. Then, several months later, we got in a knock down--drag out gang fight and I heard this older cop tell a guy: "don't mistake my politeness for weakness, because I will kick your ass up and down this street if I have to". Later, as were were leaving the call, I asked him: "do you find that this approach that you have works?" He just chuckled and said: "sometimes you have to get their attention".
Rescooped by Rob Duke from up2-21
Scoop.it!

Torture: The Use of Solitary Confinement in U.S. Prisons | Center for Constitutional Rights

Torture: The Use of Solitary Confinement in U.S. Prisons | Center for Constitutional Rights | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Via Concerned Citizen, up2-21
more...
Brittney Ward's comment, Today, 2:30 AM
Solitary confinement has always been a part of our prison system. The SHU (security housing unit) exists in many prison systems and is used to detain troubled inmates. The conditions of solitary confinement alone I don't see as cruel and unusual. I think the grey area here is time frame. Leaving someone in solitary for undermined amount of time could have psychological affects on that person.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Both sides of marijuana battle meet at forum in Fairbanks

Both sides of marijuana battle meet at forum in Fairbanks | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Note: Professor Kelly Drew's name was incorrectly listed in a prior version of the story. It has been since updated.
more...
Andrew Marso's comment, September 14, 3:10 AM
I am wholeheartedly on the side of decriminalization (although, I would argue that all drugs should be decriminalized). Portugal's very liberal drug laws are something that we should aspire to. First, decriminalization has led to a drop in drug related crime (aside from simple possession) and a drop in drug related diseases (HIV, Hepatitis, etc.). Second, the regulation of drugs (something I'm actually against for a reason I will not touch on here) and the end of the war on drugs would lead to a huge boost for the economy. In addition to these reasons, if one argues that alcohol should be legal, I see no logical reason why marijuana shouldn't be. Finally, once again, I agree with Clay. This would hopefully pull some power from an overreaching federal government.
Rob Duke's comment, September 14, 12:24 PM
Now's a good time to do the pull back, too. As the economy heats up, we could cut spending on narcotics enforcement, retire some debt, thus accomplishing smart monetary policy; and, as the business cycle matures, we would taper out by lowering taxes. My guess is that, like alcohol and tobacco, there's a tax and tariff model that would make MJ and drugs pay for their own healthcare needs.
Brittney Ward's comment, Today, 2:38 AM

I agree with Andrew here, legalization would result in an economy boost. Cutting spending on drug enforcement and being able to tax marijuana like we do alcohol would create revenue. Not to mention relieving correctional facilities from misdemeanor offenders would help the overcrowding problem we have in the prison system.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

City Council To Vote On Body Cameras For Anaheim Police - CBS Los Angeles

City Council To Vote On Body Cameras For Anaheim Police - CBS Los Angeles | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Small video cameras could soon be mounted on the uniform of every police officer in Anaheim following a City Council vote set for Tuesday evening.
more...
Clay Faris's comment, September 11, 6:12 PM
The good thing about the higher end bodycams is that they come with (ugh) proprietary software that prevents tampering, altering, or deleting files by the end users (officers). The bad thing about them is that they come with proprietary software that ultimately requires a dedicated computer/server to hold all of the information.
Rachael Toy's comment, September 11, 9:11 PM
Like the article said, I think this is a great idea. People need to trust in the police again and this is a great way to do it. This way both police officers and citizens will be protected from false allegations and mistreatment. It is a great way to have extra prove or evidence in situations that aren’t so clear. It may also catch some more crime, I don’t know. But if it is something that can be purchased and well maintained, there shouldn’t be a reason to not have them. I think it is a win-win situation for everyone. Hopefully this will be approved and then tested in the years to come to see how affected it is and how people feel about them. I think my only concerns would be the cost of purchasing and maintaining them as well as the integrity of using them. I don’t know what all the rules are but would you have to be notified that the officer has a camera for privacy reasons or is that something that doesn’t have to be disclosed. Unfortunately, as much good as something is someone will always find a way to use it for bad.
Ricky Osborne's comment, Today, 2:21 AM
99 percent of police officers do their job well and in a way that would gain public approval. The 1 percent of officers that do not ruin such public approval from occurring in a wide scale manner. Incidents where an officer over steps or mismanages a situation seem to be occurring at a higher rate than in the past due to video evidence. Smart phones and portable cameras are more widely available today that they were in the past. Due to this, police officers have been put under the surveillance of the public when carrying out their duties. These body cameras will help gain the trust of the public once again. As I stated before, 99 percent of officers do their job well. These body cameras will help show that on a widescale.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Research: We’re Too Busy to Follow the Rules

Research: We’re Too Busy to Follow the Rules | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
When work is demanding, it’s the little (but really important) things that suffer.
Rob Duke's insight:

Citrus Heights PD near Sacramento give officers a sabbatical....

more...
Brandon Jensen's comment, September 10, 7:37 PM
I can understand people getting tired from a long shift and how that could have an effect on them skipping the smaller stuff but in their profession it seems off to have them skip that step. When hygiene is a major part of your actual job, I wouldn't agree with the statement made, "We're too busy to follow the rules" that seems pretty contradictory to their job! Of course there could be other factors as well, maybe some of the people were just really busy and they forget but I would think that in all their training and education they would just get used to it.
Rachael Toy's comment, September 11, 11:10 PM
This is pretty scary to put numbers to how many times the little steps are skipped when you are in a hurry or over exhausted. It isn’t an excuse but I can completely understand their point of view. I think that this occurs in many professions like hospitals and police stations or court rooms. I can assume it could even be found in jobs like fast food or the post office. It makes you wonder how many things have gone wrong because people skip a step due to over work or fatigue. I think things should be put into place that help people gather themselves like the article states taking naps, walks or a 10 minutes break. But also triple enforce the importance of smaller simpler tasks that can’t be skipped even when busy because of their importance.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Rise of the SWAT Team in American Policing

SWAT teams, created to quell unrest in Los Angeles in the 1960s, are the principal beneficiaries of heavy-duty military equipment from the federal government.
more...
Brandon Jensen's comment, September 10, 6:01 PM
SWAT teams are very useful when it comes to dangerous or violent situations but I do agree that they should not be over-used. I found the video with the article to be really interesting, learning more about the SWAT teams main operations and how they came to be. I always thought some situations where SWAT was used seemed to be a bit over kill, which I get, there are going to be some situation where you do not know what you are walking into and its best to be prepared. Then we hear about some of the situations where nothing is happening and there are times when people get hurt, it is almost near impossible to know for 100% what will happen or who is in the building at the time, but I've always wondered if there was a way to be more sure on the situation before breaking the door down to find nothing.
Rob Duke's comment, September 11, 3:20 AM
In planning, the law demands that certain conditions are met in terms of health and safety. This requires (a) finding(s) based upon articulated facts. Perhaps this is what we need, like a night service warrant where we need a separate affidavit signed by a judge to justify the use a SWAT type methods to serve warrants. Developing emergencies like the Hollywood bank robbery would not need these findings due to the exigency represented.
Rachael Toy's comment, September 11, 9:34 PM
This article kind of makes me cringe. The first thing I think of when I hear police going military is that something bad is about to happen as it has in history many times. I am very against this approach. First off, police are supposed to be about community. About connecting and protecting the community they are a part of. I want police to be approachable, friendly, and someone I can trust when I am in need. Obviously they need to be tough and have access to tools that will help then bust down on some pretty bad criminals but there is a point where it is taking too far. SWAT teams are very important and I agree we need them, but like the article stated, the mentality of the military is much more detrimental than that of the police (or it should be). So if a matter is that big, why not call in the National Guard, isn’t that part of their job; to defend the community as well. We aren’t doing something right if our society is so out of control that we need police to have military grade tools to protect us. Plus our Constitution gives us the right to defend ourselves. How can one defend themselves against a military style force? I don’t think that this should be what our police are all about. This gives off too much fear and not enough legitimacy to our officers.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

San Jose Police Sgt. Scott Castruita Responds to Oakland Firefighter Allegations of Oakland Police Misconduct

San Jose Police Sgt. Scott Castruita Responds to Oakland Firefighter Allegations of Oakland Police Misconduct | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
San Jose Police Sgt. Scott Castruita Responds to Oakland Firefighter Allegations of Oakland Police Misconduct
Rob Duke's insight:

Body cameras: every cop should be wearing them.  I worry about the storage capacity issues and cost, but it's clear that they will save many officers from false complaints.

 

Be sure to scroll down and watch the full video.

more...
Rachael Toy's comment, September 6, 3:00 AM
I am glad that this officer was wearing a camera because it could have possible saved his job, his reputation, and a lot of more press on racial discrimination that as a society we don’t need. First I am so disappointed that we are so stuck on racial discrimination. I know it still exist but seriously, this guy needed to claim that in this situation. Second, it is still hard for me to believe that we have come to a point in our society that cops need to be wearing cameras everywhere they go. We are all human and we all make mistakes and that needs to be remembered. Cops are no different than me and you, they will also make mistakes and do things wrong. At the same time though, cops wearing cameras could help both cops and peoples from false everything. If cameras are worn then cops who are bad and use excessive force can be punished as well as situations as this one that when the cop actually did good, will not be punished. It seems like anymore everyone has got to watch their own back.
Rodney Ebersole's comment, September 6, 4:22 PM
This officer seemed to be doing exactly as he had been trained, it was unfortunate that the kids were frightened in the process but as the article pointed out, the kids should never had been in there in the first place. The retired officer was correct in the thought that the kids seeing their dad killed or hurt was definitely worse that an officer speaking harshly to them. I think the cameras on all officers is a very real need and should be required, it safe guards against wrong complaints and it is a personal check and balance for the officer as they can go back and see exactly what they said. I thought most police vehicles have cameras on the front of them to also aid in this, but a body camera makes it even better. If costs are of concern then an audio device should at least be used. This body camera really didn't show what happened due to bad quality, but the voices made it very clear what was happening and proved there were no racial issues or wrongdoing.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The voice of Interior Alaska since 1903
more...
Billy Homestead's comment, September 12, 3:09 PM
The idea of mounting cameras on officer to make sure they are showing integrity and following policy seems demeaning. Police officers have taken a oath to serve and protect their community. There is a legitimate power and trust by the community officers must uphold. We here again and again of officer who hurt this image law enforcement officers are proud and believe in.
Billy Homestead's comment, September 12, 3:18 PM
Continued... Mounting cameras on officer would still be a concern for most officers who shown integrity and follow policy. This information would be examined in court cases and juries would decide the officers fate. Most individuals in our communities have no idea of the crime and dangers around them in their daily live, living in a bubble, so to speak. If your never directly influenced by this environment, should you really be in a position to determine the level of force used, or why the suspect was arrested in such a aggressive manner?
Rob Duke's comment, September 13, 4:07 PM
The old saying is that cops must decide in 10 seconds (or tenths of seconds) what everyone else gets to sit around and debate for the next 10 years. That's so true, but don't you think the body camera genie is out of the bottle (and, to quote Taylor Swift, "never ever ever" going back)?
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

'Django Unchained' Actress Explains Why She Refused To Give LAPD Her ID

As previously reported, last week two Studio City police officers in Los Angeles detained and allegedly mistook "Django Unchained" star Daniele Watts for a prostitute after they saw her -- reportedly fully clothed -- kissing boyfriend and c...
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a good one to help explain the readings a little better:

 

More comes out on this story:

 

Actress' perspective: American's (and cops) still can't accept an inter-racial relationship.

Cops: someone called to say a prostitution transaction is occurring in a car (in that area, that sounds consistent).  Now I see a skinny black chick kissing some white "john" in a car.  Maybe, maybe not, let's see....

 

Actress perspective: I'm being harassed and I don't feel like cooperating.

Cop perspective: look, someone called me.  If you just give me your I.D., I can log this and we can all get on with our lives.

 

Actress perspective: someone has to take a stand.

Cop perspective: woah! innocent people don't act like this, maybe this person is involved in something (plus, don't screw with the po-po because I can make things uncomfortable and I will so you won't develop a habit of this).

 

Like Dennis Miller used to say: That's my perspective, but I could be wrong....

 

There's never enough hours in the day, but a little neighborhood garden tending might be in order.  Hold some meetings, bring a little food, gets people there so they can meet the neighbors.  That builds cop/citizen relationships and gets people talking with one another.  That reduces feelings of "they just don't like us" and "we don't like 'those people' here".

 

This is the idea of soft power at work (velvet glove).  It has to be done early and often (like caring for a garden); then like a battery it builds up your power (and legitimacy) for times when you have no choice but to use your hard power (iron fist).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

San Bernardino man in standoff captured after shooting at kids, cops

San Bernardino man in standoff captured after shooting at kids, cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
SAN BERNARDINO >> A man shot at a group of people surrounding an ice cream truck on Sunday afternoon and then retreated into his home, prompting evacuations and a response from the Police Department’s SWAT team.He shot at officers
Rob Duke's insight:

...shooting at kids and the ice cream truck!

more...
Brittany Stahle's comment, Today, 8:16 PM
According to the article they have had issues with this man before several times concerning his dog and the neighbors. It would be scary knowing one of your neighbors were dangerous where they act out with force as he did. Having this incident where children were put into harm would be terrifying and this man should be charged. I could not imagine just walking out of my house to get ice cream from the ice cream truck and all of a sudden I am being shot at. I am very glad no one was injured and everyone made it out okay.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from up2-21
Scoop.it!

How the Criminal Justice System Impacts Well-Being - Collateral Consequences - YouTube

To watch the full discussion or to learn more about the Well-Being Initiative, visit www.wellbeinginitiative.org In this clip from the Charles Koch Institute...

Via Concerned Citizen, up2-21
Rob Duke's insight:

See Therapeutic Jurisprudence as a theory base.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Homeland Security Today: New York City Adopts RFID Tags to Track First Responders

Homeland Security Today: New York City Adopts RFID Tags to Track First Responders | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Homeland Security Today is the leading source for independent news and analysis on homeland security affairs
Rob Duke's insight:

Can these be hacked?

more...
Ricky Osborne's comment, Today, 2:26 AM
These RFID tags that will be attached to first responders is a great idea. The tragic event of September 11, 2001 showed that a new system needed to be in placed in order to ensure the safety of first responders. Many lost their lives trying the save others from the devastation of that days events. These RFID chips will aid in that quest as each first responders location will be tracked through a computer system. If they themselves are need of aid, they will be able to be tracked and their location found in an effective manner. The implementation of this new technology show that “the rules of the game” can change for the better.
Shelly DeWilde's comment, Today, 3:20 AM
I don't believe that the RFID trackers can be hacked because it has a base that sends out a specific code to the tags within a certain perimeter, I think of my bluetooth stereos however the base has discretion on who it lets in. I think that this idea is great in fast paced dangerous jobs that require that everyone be accounted for. I hear that they want to use this technology on the people in grade schools like staff and students, I think that idea will create a lot of debate.
Rob Duke's comment, Today, 3:22 AM
Thanks for the additional info...
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Criminal Justice in America
Scoop.it!

Albuquerque Police Chief Says Dept is “Stuck” with Officers Who “Shouldn’t be on the Force.”

In a shockingly honest and refreshing interview with USA Today, Albuquerque Police Chief Eden stated, "I believe there are people on the force who shouldn't be on the force,'' and admitted that they may be stuck with those dangerous officers; thanks to police unions making discipline for past actions extremely difficult. Since 2009, the Albuquerque…

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Rob Duke's insight:

Oof, that's gonna be a great quote when they get sued for "failure to supervise"....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Calling the shots

Calling the shots | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
IF A gun fires and nobody reports it, does it make a sound? Some police forces are finding out. On September 3rd the Urban Institute, a think-tank, produced a report...
more...
Shelly DeWilde's comment, Today, 3:34 AM
When I read that 7% of the gunshots located through this microphone system are proven true while the rest remain questionable and inconsequential in court I had my doubts to the mass implementation of this technology however I can't deny that the population would agree with its use. There are definitely lines that need to be drawn however much like changing police organizations its like standing on quicksand in regards to the advancement and use of technology. I believe that using these microphones in every precinct jurisdiction would not be cost effective and the public would actually dispute its use however in areas where crime is high I believe it would be a relief.
Rob Duke's comment, Today, 3:51 AM
Salinas P.D. had a real problem with gun shots over New Years and one year had an innocent person hit. After putting this system in and advertising the heck out of it, they substantially cut down on random firing into the air activity. I don't know if they still have it in operation.
Rob Duke's comment, Today, 1:44 PM
There's also been a little work in Afghanistan that uses a Bayes statistic model to track insurgent activity and then predict that more activity will likely occur (like ripples from a pool). What they seem to be finding is that the increased activity can be contained with increased patrols and the hearts-and-minds work that goes hand in hand with nation building. I found the same tactics worked in policing high gang/crime areas. If intel suggested that a dispute was brewing, police action could often cool things long enough to turn potential homicides into less serious reprisals. I haven't figured out this theory yet, nor how to test it, but these gunshot monitors might be one tool to use in testing a dispute resolution model to reducing gang violence. If it was used to inform where we focus our intelligence efforts and then, hearts-and-minds activities (e.g. after-school programs, athletics, etc.).
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Former Wichita Police Chief Williams was on credibility-issues list, documents show

Former Wichita Police Chief Williams was on credibility-issues list, documents show | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Norman Williams – until Friday the chief of the state’s largest police department – was on a list of Wichita police personnel who could have credibility issues should they be called to testify in criminal cases, according to information the city has released.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Criminal Justice in America
Scoop.it!

Feds Donate Thousands of Bayonets to Local Police

Feds Donate Thousands of Bayonets to Local Police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The recent political crisis in Ferguson, MO put a national spotlight on police militarization. For years, the Department of Defense has been sending military ha

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Rob Duke's insight:

The K-Bar knife was designed to be the equivalent of that foldy shovel or swiss army knife.  It's the belt knife and it can mount as a bayonet.  To say that the army donated a bunch of bayonets is misleading, but that's what we get for over-using our military equipment and training.

more...
Clay Faris's comment, September 11, 5:46 PM
Rob, agreed. The headline is quite misleading. However the larger issue of the police having military equipment (MRAPS, Bearcats, ceramic plate carriers, etc) and military training/tactics is very real. The militarization of the police in the US should concern everyone. Wonder if we should thank Daryl Gates for starting all of this? Haha!
Andrew Marso's comment, September 14, 2:51 AM
I agree with you, Clay. This militarization is quite concerning. We forbid the military from acting within our country then turn the police into the military. The part I found very disturbing about this article, however, was the "what if scenarios." If this is the excuse for militarization there is no end.
Rob Duke's comment, September 14, 12:37 PM
Clay: No doubt, it's been abused. When we have the equipment and training, it's hard not to use it. Having said that, one of my brothers is alive today because of an MRAP. He was ambushed and pinned down by an angel dust hyped up cartel member with a fully auto AR-15. My brother had just a curb to protect him and his .40 Glock. The entry team arrived minutes later with an MRAP and drove up over the curb covering my brother while other officers engaged the bad guy. This was L.A., but this sort of thing happens all over now. We lost 3 or 4 officers to ambushes in the last 24 hours in the heartland, as well as, in cities. This is the second paradox that I talk about in Black Board: even condemned prisoners get last requests--officers are always going to feel justified in the idea that they will do what it takes to go home at the end of watch. How do we withhold that power (and appropriate tools)?
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Report details pros, cons of Placer County justice system | Auburn Journal

Report details pros, cons of Placer County justice system | Auburn Journal | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Local auburn news. Latest Current News. Breaking News, Local newspaper's online edition with news, classifieds, and editorials.
Rob Duke's insight:

AB 109 is the realignment response to the 3-judge Federal panel that required the release of some 50,000 prisoners.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

A retired cop's shocking life of drugs and crime

A retired cop's shocking life of drugs and crime | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A retired police commander kept a stunning secret for more than two decades: Before joining the NYPD, he peddled crack, tried to murder a fellow drug dealer and was close pals with a notorious cop ...
more...
Kimberly Maddigan's comment, September 9, 11:30 PM
This article is crazy. I cannot believe that this retired police officer got away with the crimes he has committed. It is even more shocking to me, that he was able to become a police officer based on his prior record. Why weren't these offenses caught? More importantly, why was he still able to become a police officer? It's scary that this guy was a person who we as a society would trust to protect us. He was walking around armed, and he had shot two people! I don't think this was a person who 'made mistakes in their past' and realized it was wrong and tried to become good. If that was the case, he would not have been friends with a 'notorious cop killer,' nor would he bragging about his past. It's a shame that he cannot be punished for his crimes, and shame that he was honorably discharged and now a retired police commander.
Niki Wilson's comment, September 10, 6:59 PM
I think the most terrifying part about this article is that if all of this is true, his fellow officers didn't even notice. How can you hide an entire dark side of yourself from people you see everyday? Not only is he violating his oath to serve and protect but he also violated the unspoken promise of trust you hold with your coworkers. As a police officer his duty was not only to take care of the public but also the other officers.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, September 11, 1:18 AM
This article and the comments the retired officer made about about the past, not the present. It is not saying he did any illegal activity while as an officer of the law. The article mentions he is trying to hype up his yet to be released book, and that is more than likely whats behind the stories. Perhaps his life experience gave him a better understanding of the individuals he dealt with, and how to know BS when he sees it. I don't condone anything he has done in the past, but its obvious his actions as an officer he tried to better himself and educate others. Is the actions as a 17 year old going to be the same as an adult? No, but this is kind of like when a person receives a felony on their record, do you never higher them and cast them out of society, or do you give them a chance to prove worth? Honesty is the best policy, but all it would have given him is a closed door not to prove himself.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Woodland city manager: Police dept. didn't request bayonets

Woodland city manager: Police dept. didn't request bayonets | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Woodland city official said Saturday that the city's police department didn't receive more than a dozen military bayonets, despite a report that was recently released by the Governor's Office of Emergency Services.
more...
Brandon Jensen's comment, September 10, 7:50 PM
I could see this as a fluke, I mean who would really use a bayonet these days, let alone 15 of them. I thought the woman in the video clip had a good point, why do they need all these items, I don't really see an immediate reason for them to stock pile all this equipment for a situation that may never even happen.
Rob Duke's comment, September 11, 1:34 AM
I used this same program (at the closed McClelland AFB). For everything you submitted a request for, you were denied 9 times out of 10. Given this, you tended to put in for things that you didn't really need with the idea that you wouldn't get it anyway; or, like RADAR on mash, you might be able to trade it to your neighbor police department for something you could use. In my experience, it was a mostly worthless program and after a couple visits, I gave up trying to get equipment. I suspected that bigger agencies had better luck (maybe if you visited all the time, etc.).
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Criminal Justice in America
Scoop.it!

Gun Maker Blocked from Processing Credit Card Sales — and Guess Which Obama Policy Its Blaming for It

Gun Maker Blocked from Processing Credit Card Sales — and Guess Which Obama Policy Its Blaming for It | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Oregon-based gun maker said Thursday that it has been blocked from processing credit card transactions by its long-standing credit card company, and believes it is the latest victim of the Obama administration's "Operation Choke Point." The Obama administration has said Choke Point lets the Departments of Justice...

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
more...
Niki Wilson's comment, September 10, 8:15 PM
I agree with the statement that this sounds more like strong arming than law enforcement. If there is no evidence of illegal activity the government has no right to force the banks to be uncooperative with this man's or anyone's business for that matter. Taking away his ability to charge credit cards is definitely infringing on his rights as an American business owner.
Rob Duke's comment, September 11, 1:44 AM
Restricting access to ammo is another way to accomplish this policy of gun control....
Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, September 11, 7:10 PM

I'm curious to when the "Operation Choke Point" began with the Obama administration. Is this also another sneaky loop hole that Obama is finding a way to honor the United States Constitution? Is Obama going to be impeached? Why is this taking so long to remove someone that isn't honoring our country? I don't get it! Karmen Tobin