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Police Shoot GPS Trackers At Fleeing Suspects' Cars

Police Shoot GPS Trackers At Fleeing Suspects' Cars | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Car chases kill hundreds of people a year. But police don't want to lose their suspect by slowing down. Here's a compromise, and it involves a cannon. 
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Joshua Livingston's comment, November 11, 2013 9:28 PM
I like the device it puts the public at less risk of high speed pursuits and at the same time increases the abilities of officers to apprehend the criminal at a later time. Another benefit of being a cop they get all the cool stuff.
Sarita Spindler's comment, November 15, 2013 3:20 AM
I think this is a great device, because not only does it allow the police to track the suspect, but it also stops high speed chases from occurring. The downside of it is that it is an expensive device to use, but in some situations, catching the criminal may be worth the price of the tracker.
Dom Eubank's comment, December 10, 2013 5:23 PM
This is pretty sweet and I can see how it would be pretty effective in the long run
Police Problems and Policy
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How BART police will keep riders from hogging 2 seats

How BART police will keep riders from hogging 2 seats | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Starting this fall, BART riders who fail to contain themselves and their belongings to a single seat during the most crowded times of day may be questioned by police and have their names recorded and criminal records checked.
BART Police Chief Kenton Rainey explained Thursday how his officers will enforce the one-person, one-seat law that the transit agency’s board adopted in April. The goals, he said, are being fair to riders on crowded trains while protecting BART from complaints about profiling or harassment from those whom police question.
Rob Duke's insight:
A variation of the zero-tolerance idea that successfully cleaned up the Boston trains and NY (both under Bill Bratton)...
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Freddie Gray case: Officer Caesar Goodson Jr. not guilty on all charges

Freddie Gray case: Officer Caesar Goodson Jr. not guilty on all charges | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Baltimore judge is expected to issue a verdict in the second-degree murder trial of police Officer Caesar Goodson, Jr. on Thursday morning.
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Lydia Weiss's comment, June 24, 2:18 AM
I'm not sure I agree that he should be found not guilty, but unfortunately if the evidence is not there according to the judge, there's only so much that can be done. While I'm not saying this is enough to incite another riot, I can't help but wonder if it will.
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Alaska appeals court challenges police searches

Alaska appeals court challenges police searches | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS, Alaska (AP) — The Alaska Court of Appeals is asking the state's highest court to re-examine rules regarding police searches after throwing out a conviction for a Fairbanks man
Rob Duke's insight:
Alaska law is more restrictive than Federal Law.  See Chimel vs. California, which established the "arm's reach rule".  If a suspect could reasonably reach a spot to hide something, it ought to be searchable incident to arrest.
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Lydia Weiss's comment, June 24, 2:21 AM
I don't think the conviction should have been thrown out. The ashtray sounds like it was in plain sight, and I thought that searches were legal with probable cause, which it sounds like they had. I'd have to do more research before I can say if I fully support changing the rule though.
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Six people have died in clashes between Mexican police and teachers

The teachers had been demonstrating against the arrests of their union leaders.
Rob Duke's insight:
A contrast with how American police handle protests--is it not?
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50 Years After Watts Riots, Cops and Community Leaders Heal Old Wounds

50 Years After Watts Riots, Cops and Community Leaders Heal Old Wounds | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A rare partnership between cops and residents has begun to dissolve the chronic hostility that has plagued L.A.'s Watts district since its 1965 riots.
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Lydia Weiss's comment, June 24, 2:15 AM
I think it was really noble for the Sergeant to apologize and lead a prayer at the beginning like that. Seems to be a gesture that was hoped to help connect the groups. I do like the strategy of them working together like that, do you think this is something that could be used in the future in other locations?
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What Oakland police's 'implicit bias' could mean for police reform (+video)

What Oakland police's 'implicit bias' could mean for police reform (+video) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A team of Stanford researchers hope a collaborative approach can make police departments receptive to reform.
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Interim Oakland Police Chief Ousted After Less Than a Week

Interim Oakland Police Chief Ousted After Less Than a Week
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Baltimore Lawyer: If Prosecution Can’t Convict Next Officer In Freddie Gray Case, They’re Done

Baltimore Lawyer: If Prosecution Can’t Convict Next Officer In Freddie Gray Case, They’re Done | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The third officer charged in the death of Freddie Gray is on trial, and he may be the the prosecution's best chance to get a conviction.
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Protesters force Police Commission to cancel hearing on use of force reforms - The San Francisco Examiner

Protesters force Police Commission to cancel hearing on use of force reforms - The San Francisco Examiner | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The first of two public meetings held by the San Francisco Police Commission on a draft use of force policy was canceled because of activist interruptions Wednesday night.

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The meeting at City College of San Francisco’s Ocean Avenue campus was scheduled so the commission could hear from the public on the reforms.

But as public comment got underway, repeated outbursts and yelling forced Commission President Suzy Loftus to adjourn the meeting once, and then finally shut it down just 20 minutes after the meeting began at 6 p.m.

At one point Ilych Sato, also called “Equipto,” one of the hunger strikers known as the “Frisco 5,” yelled at Commissioner Joe Marshall.
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Baltimore cop caused fatal Freddie Gray injury: prosecutor

Baltimore cop caused fatal Freddie Gray injury: prosecutor | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Baltimore police officer fatally injured black detainee Freddie Gray by giving him a "rough ride" in transport van, a prosecutor said on Thursday in opening statements of the murder trial of a third officer in Gray's death.
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Lydia Weiss's comment, June 21, 2:55 AM
I understand that sometimes discretion is used for many situations, but some procedures should always be followed. I understand that according to this, the suspect was thrashing around a lot, but he still should have been buckled in. They have all those "Always click it" commercials for a reason, and that should apply to everyone.
Lydia Weiss's comment, June 21, 2:55 AM
I understand that sometimes discretion is used for many situations, but some procedures should always be followed. I understand that according to this, the suspect was thrashing around a lot, but he still should have been buckled in. They have all those "Always click it" commercials for a reason, and that should apply to everyone.
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Deputies Shoot, Kill Family Dog After Responding to Wrong House

Deputies Shoot, Kill Family Dog After Responding to Wrong House | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Beloved husky mix "Buddy" the latest victim of police violence.
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Lydia Weiss's comment, June 21, 2:49 AM
I can't help but wonder where in this process they realized they were at the wrong house. If it was before they shot the dog, I can't help but feel a bit like they were in the wrong. If they did not know, however, I can see why they might have been keeping an eye out for an attack dog. Pets are family, too, so I can't imagine what the family is going through right now. I've lost a few pets over my lifetime, but none in this manner.
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DASHCAM: Officer Tasers Teen into Coma - Calibre Press

DASHCAM: Officer Tasers Teen into Coma - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
During an arrest on Sept. 14, 2014, Runnels used a stun gun on Masters after a traffic stop and then dropped the handcuffed teen onto the pavement. Masters went into cardiac arrest that resulted in oxygen deprivation and brain damage.

The Truman High School senior nearly died, according to court testimony.

Runnels pleaded guilty and was sentenced last week to four years in federal prison for violating Masters’ civil rights. The dashcam video was played in court during his sentencing hearing.
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Lydia Weiss's comment, June 13, 2:14 AM
What this officer did is not right. He was one of what I hope are a FEW bad apples that exist on the force. Unfortunately, most of the time, we hear only of the bad apples and not the good cops. However, some of the comments on the article you linked are appalling. "The only thing better than a pig going to jail is hearing that a cop has died. That is the best day." That disgusts me as much as the crime committed by this officer. After having worked with some officers, who I believe to be benevolent and good cops, hearing someone say that gets my blood boiling.
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Memphis officer struck, killed after 3 shot in Memphis

Memphis officer struck, killed after 3 shot in Memphis | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
MEMPHIS, Tenn.
Rob Duke's insight:
Is an officer justified in shooting at a person in a vehicle?  Some departments have made it against policy, but this case illustrates why it is often reasonable force.  Remember that Tennessee v. Garner (1985) said that officers could not shoot a fleeing felon without other factors (e.g. extremely heinous offense, or immediate endangerment of another).  Essentially, there's a due process problem with shooting someone that might not be guilty of a capital offense.  However, the court returned just a few years later (1989) with Graham v. Connor and amended their use of force rule from a due process (and linear model...i.e., an officer's use of force progressed on a continuum) to an objective reasonableness standard where an officer can choose any force option that is reasonable given their training & experience and the facts known at the time.  Under Graham, shooting at a moving vehicle that endangers is often reasonable force.  The death of this officer shows why.
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The Senate rejected new FBI surveillance powers—at least for now

The Senate rejected new FBI surveillance powers—at least for now | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The amendment would have given the FBI the ability to to check citizens’ browsing history without a court order. 
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Video: Madison police arrest woman outside mall

Video: Madison police arrest woman outside mall | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Note: This video contains graphic content. A bystander shot the video of Madison police making a controversial arrest at a Madison shopping mall.
Rob Duke's insight:
Thoughts?  She was threatening to stab security at a mall and brandishing a knife.  Did the officers do the right thing?  What other use of force might they have been authorized to use and how does that compare with what you see here?
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Old nemesis, the police, now secure safety for gay community

Old nemesis, the police, now secure safety for gay community | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Decades ago, an early morning raid at the Stonewall Inn in New York sparked violent protests among gay patrons who fought back after police burst in and tried to arrest them for daring to drink and dance with members of the same sex. Nearly 50 years later, officers armed with assault rifles stand guard outside the historic bar, protecting patrons after a gunman in Florida staged a massacre at a gay nightclub and spread fear of more attacks. At gay pride parades this weekend, that evolution will be on display in cities like Denver, where the first parade in 1975 was in response to police raids on gay bars and arrests of gay men. The persecution reflected views in society at large: [...] 1973, the American Psychiatric Association classified homosexuality as a mental disorder, and it was only in 2003 that a Supreme Court ruling declared state sodomy laws to be an unconstitutional violation of personal privacy. In San Francisco, the police department has been shamed by the recent discovery of racist and homophobic text messages traded by officers. [...] a longstanding undercover police tactic in the Southern California city of Long Beach was dealt a blow last month when a judge dismissed lewd conduct and indecent exposure charges against a man arrested in a public bathroom. Numerous studies in the past six years have shown there is still a strong distrust of law enforcement, especially among LGBT people feeling bias, harassment or being assaulted by law enforcement, said Jeremy Goldbach, assistant professor at the University of Southern California School of Social Work. [...] in cities across the U.S., police officers who once were criticized for enforcing outdated laws are instead undergoing robust LGBT cultural sensitivity training. In Anchorage, Alaska, Police Chief Christopher Tolley will march in the city’s parade, and has ordered extra officers to be on scene, not because there’s been an identified threat but to show support for the LGBT community. [...] in Juneau, at a gay pride festival last weekend, a woman wearing a pride T-shirt asked a police officer if her shirt made her a target.
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Medical errors the third leading cause of death?

Medical errors the third leading cause of death? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Even scarier, perhaps, is a new study in the latest edition of BMJ suggesting most medical errors go unobserved, at least in the official record.
In fact, the study, from doctors at Johns Hopkins, suggests medical errors may kill more people than lower respiratory diseases like emphysema and bronchitis do. That would make these medical mistakes the third leading cause of death in the United States. That would place medical errors right behind heart disease and cancer.
Through their analysis of four other studies examining death rate information, the doctors estimate there are at least 251,454 deaths due to medical errors annually in the United States. The authors believe the number is actually much higher, as home and nursing home deaths are not counted in that total.
Rob Duke's insight:
If we look to the medical field, they have a very open system, thus, even though law enforcement numbers and the numbers of doctors in many communities (at least the national average) (700,000 doctors vs. 765,000 sworn officers) are similar, doctors don't seem to get the same grief. Consider for instance that the police use lethal force a few thousand times a year, and kill about 1200 a year (1186 in 2015)--most of which are justified. Doctors, in contrast were directly linked to 251,454 people killed in medical mistakes per year. The medical field is highly regulated and relatively open to scrutiny (insurance companies for instance see everything), but the police are still shielded from most oversight....is this why people (and the media) whig out when the police kill and not when doctors do so?
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Interim Oakland Police Chief ousted, 2nd one this week

Interim Oakland Police Chief ousted, 2nd one this week | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“I have informed the Mayor and City Administrator that cannot fulfill the functions of the Acting Chief of Police for the City of Oakland and I am stepping aside to take leave. When I return, I am exercising my right to return to Captain and I will continue to serve the Oakland Community, the Community I care deeply for. I thank the city for the opportunity and I am deeply sorry that I was unable to fulfill the functions of Acting Chief of Police.”

Sources tell KRON4 News Figueroa did not want his personal life put under a microscope as the Department goes through major upheaval.

The Command Staff is staying in place and will report to Landreth.

OPD does not currently have an interim chief and are looking for a person to fill the position.
Rob Duke's insight:
That's nice, but under California law, the police chief cannot be a non-sworn city administrator....surely they can find one retired chief who can act as the temp-chief....?  No city is that political--right?
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17-Year-Old Gets Suspended From High School Over A Single Tweet

17-Year-Old Gets Suspended From High School Over A Single Tweet | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
For his brash tweet, Semma was forced to write a letter of apology to the Superintendent just so he could take his final exams. The best part though, was that his parents "laughed at the tweet and called Kenneth many names" Semma said in an interview with BuzzFeed.


The Walled Lake Schools District's "Student Code Of Conduct" book does stipulate that the use of profanity can result in a suspension.
Rob Duke's insight:
Folks are demanding more rights for previously unpowerful groups (e.g. minor children).  Also, note that this was a use of Hard Power.  What alternatives did the Superintendent have?
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Adena Benn's comment, June 19, 1:46 AM
This is just poor judgment from both parties and an overreaction from the superintendent. I'm sure the superintendent wishes he would have handled the matter differently.
Lydia Weiss's comment, June 21, 3:01 AM
While it may be in the handbook that profanity is not allowed, the word "ass" is barely a word that can be viewed as profane. I know that people were saying and doing way worse stuff when I was in middle school. So calling that tweet "profanity" seems a bit off to me. However, I can understand his frustration. I'm pretty sure anyone who has spent a winter in Alaska can understand that. I feel the superintendent overreacted, however, I suppose the kid needs to realize (as I'm sure he has by now) that anyone can see that kind of stuff posted, and even if you mean something in a joking manner, it sometimes will not be interpreted as such when done through a medium of text.
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VIDEO: Chicago Officer on Leave after Head Stomp - Calibre Press

VIDEO: Chicago Officer on Leave after Head Stomp - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Chicago cop has been relieved of his police powers as authorities investigate a video on Facebook that appears to show him stomp on a suspect’s head while another officer struggles with the man. “After careful consideration and reviewing the video footage, Superintendent (Eddie) Johnson has decided to relieve one of the officers involved in …
Rob Duke's insight:
Fully justified.  The other officer was being choked.  He could have shot the offender.
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SURVEY ANALYSIS: Are We Training Warriors? - Calibre Press

SURVEY ANALYSIS: Are We Training Warriors? - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The false line championed by people who have a national platform is that law enforcement spends most of its training time preparing its officers to be Warriors: Command-and-control-types who are always on the offensive, force-focused, and taught to believe that nearly everyone is out to kill us.

This, of course, is nonsense.

Still, this untruth is perpetuated by many chiefs, ex-chiefs, training directors, and politicians. Chuck Wexler, who has never been a police officer, is the executive director of the Police Executive Research Foundation (PERF). He bangs this drum incessantly.

Anecdotally, those of us in the profession—and especially those of us who travel the country talking with and training law enforcement officers—have long recognized that this belief is baseless. But counter-arguments were tough to make because there are thousands of agencies with different training philosophies all around this country.

Well, now we may have something.
Rob Duke's insight:
Well there's b.s. to the left and b.s. to the right sometimes.  In the case of this article, the author approached the problem in such a way so that he could make his claim, but he failed to look under the surface.  What I mean is that he looked at departmental training to see if we're obsessed with "warrior" training, which clearly we are not.  We don't have enough time or money to do so.  Having said that, he doesn't mention the professional culture that divides cops into "warriors" and LOPS or RODS (LOPS are Lazy useless or Lazy old people; and RODS are Retired On Duty).  No one wants to be labeled a LOP or ROD, so there are off-duty functions and even on-duty sessions during the slow times to train for armed confrontations.  More than that, though, is just the mindset of the "One Ranger-One Riot" mentality that is pervasive in law enforcement--I'm not throwing too many stones here either because it's not an easy job and sometimes people do try to kill you!
For me, a few years after becoming a chief, I started asking my officers to identify as something other than a "warrior", which I saw as too disconnected with the community.  I asked them to consider something more like a soldier-priest.  This recognizes the sometimes martial nature of our business, while preserving a sense of care for the community and its members.
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Judge Finds Prosecutors Withheld Evidence in Freddie Gray Officer Case

The judge overseeing the trial of a police officer charged with murder in the death of Freddie Gray has determined that prosecutors withheld information that would have been beneficial to the defense.

Judge Barry Williams was visibly angry in the Baltimore court, but he did not dismiss the charges against police officer Caesar Goodson, as his attorneys had requested. Williams is giving prosecutors until Monday to disclose any other relevant evidence they have withheld. Goodson was the driver of the van during the arrest of Gray, 25, last year.

Goodson's attorneys have argued that prosecutors withheld statements made last year by Donta Allen, a key witness. Allen was picked up by the Baltimore police van after Gray.

In his original statement to police in April last year, Allen said he heard banging coming from Gray's side of the vehicle. He gave a similar statement in a separate interview with prosecutors a month later, but the state never turned it over as evidence to defense attorneys. Williams found today that prosecutors committed a Brady violation — after Brady v. Maryland, a 1963 Supreme Court decision requiring prosecutors to disclose evidence that would aid the defense — because Allen's May 2015 statement was deemed exculpatory evidence.

“The state doesn’t get to decide whether or not to disclose information,” defense attorney Andrew Graham said. “The state sat on it for over a year. It’s not up to them to make that decision. Even a small piece of evidence may make a difference. It’s not fair to the defense.”

He explained that had Allen’s lawyer, who was present during the second interview, not stepped forward, the defense would not have known about it. According to Graham, Allen’s lawyer didn’t come forward sooner because he felt his first obligation was to maintain his client’s confidentiality.
Rob Duke's insight:
Interesting that the cops who commit Brady aren't allowed to work after that, but prosecutors just go on with life.  Every cop knows that "if you lie, then you die."
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OHP Uses New Device To Seize Money Used During The Commission Of A Crime

OHP Uses New Device To Seize Money Used During The Commission Of A Crime | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
You may have heard of civil asset forfeiture. That's where police can seize your property and cash without first proving you committed a crime; without a warrant and without arresting you, as lon
Rob Duke's insight:
Asset forfeiture on steroids?  Or, just smart use of technology to stop the movement of funds in the underground economy?
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USC team wins class-action victory on L.A.’s controversial gang injunctions

USC team wins class-action victory on L.A.’s controversial gang injunctions | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Walking home from his girlfriend’s house late one evening in 2009, Christian Rodriguez, a 19-year-old from Mar Vista Gardens, a Los Angeles housing project, spotted his childhood friend, Alberto Cazarez.

But before he could greet him, Rodriguez and Cazarez were thrown to the ground and handcuffed by police who ran up to them from behind. Accusing Rodriguez of violating a gang injunction curfew and Cazarez of associating with him, police arrested both.

Far from being gang members, however, Rodriguez and Cazarez were straight-A students at West Los Angeles Community College.

Cazarez, 17, was released to his parents; Rodriguez was jailed and charged with violating the curfew.

Although innocent of gang involvement, because of an older brother’s gang ties, police deemed Rodriguez subject to the injunction — a court order that aims to curtail gang activity in a designated area. If convicted, he risked prison and being permanently labeled a gang member, an eventuality that would likely result in his family being evicted.
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Caesar Goodson, Van Driver in Freddie Gray Case, Opts for Bench Trial

Caesar Goodson, Van Driver in Freddie Gray Case, Opts for Bench Trial | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Caesar Goodson, the police van driver in the Freddie Gray case, opted for a bench trial on Monday in the high stakes and racially charged case.
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