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Assault weapons ban shrivels in US Senate

Assault weapons ban shrivels in US Senate | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
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Christopher Bedel's comment, March 27, 2013 1:47 PM
I am a gun owner and believe in the 2nd amendment and to hear this is great news in my mind. The gun manufactures and salesmen, along with the demand for assault rifles and high capacity magazines since the threat of a ban has caused the price of these weapons to skyrocket. I think that people need to realize that it is not the weapon’s fault for what happened to the children; the fault lies with the person who did the shooting. So far, every shooter had been mentally unstable. People like this will get weapons if they want to use them, sometimes taking weapons that are registered to other people. I get disgusted when I hear stories about shootings like these and my heart goes out to the families, but for people to point the fingers at the weapon itself, the manufacturers, or the salespeople, is just as disgusting to me.
Robert Tompkins's comment, April 2, 2013 12:26 AM
The assault weapon ban was there to bolster public opinion for the politicians during the aftermath of the Newtown shootings. They were well aware that it would not change criminals getting their hands on the weapons and would not save any lives. They were doing it for ratings. When it actually came time to do something about it, they knew it would never pass. This is a prime example of how politicians work for getting re elected and not for the good of the common man.
Kamdon Thompson's comment, April 2, 2013 11:29 PM
I am of the opinion that something does need to be done to prevent gun violence in the United States but this bill tried to do too much at once. I think that many people would be in favor of a more in depth background check on people seeking to buy guns but throwing it in with these other measures destined it for failure and perhaps that was the plan all along since it was unrealistic to think that it would pass. I think this was politicians trying to look like they are doing something about gun violence when in reality they do not know how to solve the problem as it is a very difficult one and will not be solved with one bill.

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NASCAR Becomes Latest To Denounce Indiana Anti-Gay 'Religious Freedom' Law

NASCAR Becomes Latest To Denounce Indiana Anti-Gay 'Religious Freedom' Law | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
For decades, NASCAR has been the refuge of the right, but today the sporting organization issued a strong statement condemning Indiana's anti-gay law.
Rob Duke's insight:

Yeah, we've still got room to improve, but this says a lot about America today.

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US States Ranked: How Commonly People Use Drugs to Relax

US States Ranked: How Commonly People Use Drugs to Relax | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
People in these U.S. states report using drugs to improve their mood or help them relax.
Rob Duke's insight:

Alaska is #50.  Getting high on nature instead.

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A Boston Cop Shooting and Our Post-Truth Era

A career criminal shot a good cop. There’s no dispute over the facts. But that doesn’t mean everyone accepts them.
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Arizona governor vetoes bill aimed at shielding police names

Arizona governor vetoes bill aimed at shielding police names | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"This proposal would have taken Arizona in the wrong direction, by exacerbating distrust between communities and the public safety officers responsible for protecting them, while at the same time eroding the transparency that is critical to our democracy," American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona executive director Alessandra Soler said in a statement.
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Training can bring police and communities together

Training can bring police and communities together | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The culture of policing should not be set solely by police departments, but through dialogue with the citizens they protect.
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Texas Looks To Shine Light On Private Campus Police Records

Texas Looks To Shine Light On Private Campus Police Records | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A violent arrest involving campus police at Rice University in Houston prompted a bill that would force private universities' police departments to release more information to the public.
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No Cop Acts Autonomously.....

No Cop Acts Autonomously..... | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Many people confusingly think Cops are the problem..... it's almost understandable after you see what the #MSM , Obama & friends have been up to.  The problem is not Cops..it's a corrupt justice system itself.  It's like I explain to thousands on Twitter everyday, no cop acts autonomously..... they follow their orders and their training.  There are no accidents in government, only deliberate or manufactured causes. 


Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Rob Duke's insight:

True 'dat.  There are no John Waynes anymore.  It's all organizationally driven.  And, if not that, then the culture of law enforcement fills the gaps.

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Hero cop in Boston Marathon bombing in coma after being shot in face

Police say a decorated Boston officer has been in a medically induced coma fighting for his life since he was shot in the face during a traffic stop.
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(Empathic Policing) LAPD training teaches empathy amid outcry over shootings (audio)

(Empathic Policing) LAPD training teaches empathy amid outcry over shootings (audio) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

This exercise is part of a one-week class, the latest effort by the LAPD to train cops how to de-escalate encounters with people who may be aggressive or mentally ill. The message here: Slow down and try to empathize with the person...

 

The training is hardly the same as policing taught in the academy, where officers endure grueling physical training to be able to take down bad guys. The focus in the academy is on the "use of force continuum."

 

But in this empathy training, officers are coached to back away from the person, use your first name, employ humor, paraphrase what the person is saying.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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ACLU sues San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department for access to Taser policies, practices

ACLU sues San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department for access to Taser policies, practices | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“Only by having access to the records requested by the ACLU SoCal can the public properly evaluate whether the sheriff’s department has taken seriously concerns raised by the grand jury’s final report to curtail the abusive use of Tasers,” Staff Attorney Adrienna Wong said in a statement.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a benign request, and the records should be made public.  Post them on your web page.  The suits are coming regardless, but at least you've retained some of the high ground.

 

I'm not telling SBSD anything they don't know, which means that there's probably more to this story....

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Euharlee names interim chief after police chief, lieutenant...

Euharlee names interim chief after police chief, lieutenant... | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The city of Euharlee appointed an interim chief of police Thursday night, just hours after the chief and his top lieutenant were arrested for theft of government funds and violation of oath of office.
Rob Duke's insight:

First a cautionary note: Try not to do things that will appear to be "bad" or illegal.

 

Next: have a clear contract that doesn't prohibit moonlighting even during daytime hours, because as a Chief you WILL work 24/7 in a small town.  You should make it clear that you have worked at least 40 hours each week, but I know many chief's in small towns that have worked security, crossing guards, substitute taught at local schools, taught at local college, etc.  That's not double dipping.  I don't know the case here, but making some assumptions about small town politics: you have to know when it's time to go.  If you don't, you may get a political person or group who is out for you and they will often use any method at their disposal to get you out of office--even if it means dragging you through a criminal arrest that ends up not flying in court.

 

1. try not to do anything that looks bad;

2. make it clear that you won't out stay your welcome;

3. have an at-will contract with reasonable severance pay.

 

That way, when they're done with you, they just ask you to leave; and, you'll do so knowing you have a few months pay while you find another job.

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Dashcam video shows Taser igniting car in Border Patrol fatal explosion incident, lawsuit claims

The footage, obtained by NBC San Diego, shows the agent firing the Taser into the passenger side window moments before the car bursts into flames. A federal lawsuit filed by the family of the victim, Alex Martin, claims the explosion and death were caused by the Taser and that the Border Patrol agents did not attempt to save him, the TV station reported.
Rob Duke's insight:

Air doesn't ignite.  There was something else going on in that car.  The Border Patrol agents acted quickly to move the Homeland Security vehicle that had the victim's door blocked, but by then the car was fully engulfed.

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While Legalization Reduces Drug Arrests, But Not Minority Arrest Rates, This Probably Isn't Racial Profiling

Yet racial profiling isn’t necessary about overt racism on the part of officers. Downing points to structural elements of policing that make minorities more vulnerable to arrest. Whites use drugs indoors more often, while street and stup culture brings Blacks and Latinos under closer police scrutiny. In areas with higher levels of crime -- crimes against property and persons.
Rob Duke's insight:

The Public/Private Paradox: What looks like racial profiling may in fact just be about poor people doing things in public places that more well-off people do behind closed doors.

 

I'd also examine when/where detentions happen.  If coupled with CompStat and Risk-focused Policing, then it's difficult to argue the cops are racist, since the computer directs them where to go based upon actual reported crime.

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Unenforceable law? Do we really want cops to enforce those anti-road rage laws? Apparently not.

Unenforceable law? Do we really want cops to enforce those anti-road rage laws? Apparently not. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Driver honked his horn when detective in unmarked car failed to signal, which led to him reading the driver the riot act
Rob Duke's insight:

Hmmm...but the legislature passed these laws to keep people from road raging.  So, how do we expect them to be enforced?  As a cop, you're never going to see someone be a road rager to someone else.  The best you can do is enforce/attitude adjust the pugnacious knuckleheads when they're dumb enough to do so in your presence.  Neither cop committed anything more than maybe a minor infraction.  The detective allegedly changed lanes without a signal.  If dumbass uber driver honked at you for that, you'd be quite annoyed.  That might even result in you flipping him off and him tailgaiting, and then you tap the breaks...and that's how road rage escalates.  (I'd avoid the questions about how long the guy's been in the U.S. because they lead one to believe the rant might be racially motivated.)

 

The traffic cop was talking on his cell phone and maybe speeding.  Most states exempt officers from the cell phone law for good reason (similar to talking on the radio, but the cell phone is often used to pass on confidential information).  Trucks are limited to 55 mph on most highways while autos can drive 65 or higher, so how would the truck driver know if the cop was speeding?  The traffic cop reacted better than the truck driver was entitled to receive.  He could have written the ticket, so the truck driver would be a better citizen, but he chose to counsel instead.

 

We have a saying: If you chew out, then don't cite.  Sometimes what someone needs is an ass-chewing, but they don't like to get an ass-chewing and a ticket along with it.  Neither cop followed up with a citation, so that leads me to believe that they were following this unwritten rule.  I see these as "clearing the temple of money-changers" moments and not unacceptable cop behavior.  Both incidents were predicated on the quarrelsome drivers' behaviors.  In other words, don't be a pugnacious ass while driving and you never need to worry that a cop might pull you over, dress you down, and maybe also write a ticket.

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SC Johnson’s CEO on Doing the Right Thing, Even When It Hurts Business

SC Johnson’s CEO on Doing the Right Thing, Even When It Hurts Business | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
We had a choice: Risk losing customers and market share by replacing the original product with an inferior one, or continue with the original formulation and risk losing the goodwill we had built over the years with consumers and other stakeholders. Some on the team argued that we should keep the original formulation and wait it out; others disagreed.
Rob Duke's insight:

Good advice also for policing.  See Chester Barnard's "Functions of the Executive" for more on the primary job of the CEO is to be the moral guide of the organization.

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EDITORIAL: Police shouldn't be investigating their own

EDITORIAL: Police shouldn't be investigating their own | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
It is common sense — or rather it should be — that law enforcement shouldn't be entirely trusted when investigating one of its own. There's an inherent conflict of interest involved, and at the very least serious charges against a police officer should be handled by an independent entity.
Rob Duke's insight:

Independent, but also made up of those who understand policing.  If not, then the officers themselves won't trust the investigation.  A completely fair system would have several independent, but parallel investigations: 1. internal-policy and civil purview; 2. internal--criminal purview; 3. prosecutorial; and 4. independent.  You might be surprised to know that we already do the first three.

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Report: LAPD Doesn't Thoroughly Monitor Its Patrol-Car Video

Report: LAPD Doesn't Thoroughly Monitor Its Patrol-Car Video | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Supervisors do check to make sure the in-car cameras have been turned on, according to the report by Inspector General Alex Bustamante.
Rob Duke's insight:

I don't see how any city would have the resources to monitor all the video created every shift by every officer.....

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More restrictive spring break pondered after party shooting

More restrictive spring break pondered after party shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
(AP) — A house party that dissolved into a hail of gunfire and left seven young people hurt has officials on the Florida Panhandle pondering what to do with a spring break season they say has gotten out of control. The raucous parties in the spring break capital of Panama City Beach have, for years, had politicians, police and businesses tussling over how much to crack down on a key economic force. The city council held an emergency meeting Saturday to address spring break, allocating up to $2
Rob Duke's insight:

Merchants love the kids and their loose pockets, until the cleanup and public safety bills lead to more taxes, then its time to clamp down.  Then the kids find another town to terrorize.  The cycle repeats.

A balanced response with planned public safety, zero tolerance can lead to a healthy and sustainable holiday crowd.  The real rowdies will find somewhere else and about 80% of the kids will prefer the structure.

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Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Madison Police officer indicted for civil rights violation

Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Madison Police officer indicted for civil rights violation | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -  The U.S. Attorney's Office in Birmingham announced Friday that Madison Police Officer Eric Parker has been indicted on civil rights violations charges. The incident took place t...
Rob Duke's insight:

Who Watches the Watchmen? What's going on with the other two cops that watched this going on and did nothing?

 

The first two outraged citizens should have been the fellow officers.  Don't help brush grass off the man, call a supervisor, tell that officer to get away from the man and, for God's sake, render aid!

 

I've put my body between an officer who was assaulted and angry with a detainee (I'm talking a single blow, in response to an assault, not an unprovoked fusillade).  I think it's "ok" to take the blow on your body and tell that officer to take a walk, but to watch this go down and do nothing is unacceptable.

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Actress Taraji Henson apologizes to Glendale police for racial profile claims

“Empire” actress Taraji P. Henson apologized for alleging that Glendale police racially profiled her son during a traffic stop after a video obtained by the Los Angeles Times cast doubt about whether police had improperly targeted him.
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VIDEO: Release Contradicts Actress' Claims - Calibre Press

In an interview with Uptown magazine, Empire actress Taraji P. Henson claimed that her son was racially profiled by police in a “bogus” stop. The Glendale, Calif., PD released video of the stop, which shows her son running through a lighted crosswalk, admitting to possession of marijuana and Ritalin without prescriptions and being treated by …
Rob Duke's insight:

A difference of perception is one thing, but.....

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A culture of workers' comp abuse at the LAPD and LAFD

A culture of workers' comp abuse at the LAPD and LAFD | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Los Angeles police and firefighters work in a culture that encourages excessive and questionable workers' compensation claims, often for entirely preventable injuries, costing taxpayers tens of millions of dollars a year, according to new audits by Controller Ron Galperin. The reports follow a Times' investigation last year that found that the city's public safety personnel take paid injury leave at significantly higher rates than public safety employees elsewhere in California.
Rob Duke's insight:

Please wait, while I ramble on:

 

Many cities have had a long-term strategy of under staffing their public safety services, which means that injuries increase.

 

They should, however, have a policy of no on-duty workout to reduce these claims.

 

It's disingenuous to say that public safety make more on 4850 (that's the Govt. Code that pays 100% of their salaries); because almost everyone has large amounts of mandatory overtime (court time, end of shift arrests, mandatory training on days off, etc.).  Given this, very few cops/firefighters are thrilled to be on 4850--even at 100% of base pay.

 

There are those who abuse work comp and they should be prosecuted and fired, but it's not as easy as just pointing to one out every five and say, "you're the cheater".  The troops know who's who, but good luck proving it.  How do the troops know when you can't prove it?  Well, speaking only for the cops, because that's what I know: we all know that injuries occur by a ratio of active calls, so those who show up at active calls regularly, and those who initiate lots of arrests, we'd expect them to have more injuries.  Those who take the paper calls and hide out when felonious activities are afoot, well, we know who those folks are and it's smells suspicious when they're always out on work comp.  Again, try proving it.  The thing is that these folks avoid the hot calls for a reason: they're either not cut out for it; or, they've grown to hate it.  Call some of it PTSD, if you like, but it's taboo and no one wants to admit that they have it.  Some is poor motivation, some self-inflicted, and some who are victims of big organizations and the impersonal treatment that runs amok in every big organization, some are victims of predatory managers.  Given this, it's not enough to say, "Oh, now we're going to fix work comp."  You'll also need to fix mental health; and, improve management, dispute resolution systems, and the perception that merit and promotion are fair.  Until you do this, you'll continue to have people who avoid these unpleasant work place situations through suspicious injuries.  This will require leaders who are skilled in administration, politics, human resources, and the symbolic aspects of any organization--that well-rounded leadership is rare.  Having said that, good managers and good management systems will accomplish 80% of this for you, but it's going to involve bureaucracy, which leach off energy and resources.

Ramble Concluded.

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How Our Vengeful Society Destroys Vulnerable People

How Our Vengeful Society Destroys Vulnerable People | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
America's war on drugs is rife with terrible tactics that succeed in exacerbating the very problems they purport to fix. But even in that rich field of wildly misguided policy, few things are as bad as the treatment of poor people struggling with addiction. 

From throwing drug users in jail, to shipping them to court-ordered rehab, to taking kids away from their mothers, standard responses to addiction can trigger trauma and mental health problems that often lead to substance abuse in the first place. And some of the most vulnerable populations—the homeless, or poor and minority women—become ensnared in a system of state control that can wreck any chance they have of pulling their lives back together. 

Over the course of five years, sociologists Susan Sered and Maureen Norton-Hawk tracked 47 women in the Boston area after their release from jail. Many had problems with substance abuse, cycled in and out of homelessness, and suffered from trauma rooted in childhood abuse or violence they experienced as adults.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Ferguson shooting suspect confessed on hidden camera, warrant reveals

Ferguson shooting suspect confessed on hidden camera, warrant reveals | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A confidential informant wearing a hidden video camera recorded accused gunman Jeffrey L. Williams admitting that he fired the shots that seriously wounded two police officers during a recent demonstration in Ferguson, Mo., according to search warrants obtained by Yahoo News.
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