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Family of Jason Mahi and Off-Duty Anchorage Police Sgt. Recall Walmart Shooting

Family of Jason Mahi and Off-Duty Anchorage Police Sgt. Recall Walmart Shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
On Saturday afternoon, the family of Midtown Walmart manager Jason Mahi, 33, heard the startling news that he had been shot at work.
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Jenna Alatalo's comment, March 21, 2013 11:54 PM
This entire story freaks me out. I realize that Anchorage is becoming more urban as the minutes, hours, days, months, years, etc. go by, but to think that you could be shot while going to Wal-Mart to buy dog food just scares me. The defendant shot the manager of the store because he was upset about having to follow the service dog rules…what if my daughter or someone else’s mother angered the defendant as well? What if we took his parking spot or cut him off in an aisle or took the last bag of chips? Could we have just as easily been shot? It’s great that an off-duty police officer was there to help assist, but the whole thing is still scary.
Christopher Bedel's comment, March 27, 2013 1:48 PM
This is truly a sad story. A manager just doing his job shot like this over an unleashed service dog. It may be Wal-Mart’s policy to have service dogs leashed, but that’s no reason to shoot someone. I think the officer did a great job of being a witness since he was unarmed. There are places where off duty police officers are required to be armed, Anchorage must not have that rule. This is an instance where it could have been needed to control the shooter.
Joe L.'s comment, March 30, 2013 2:38 PM
I find the mental health aspect of the suspect interesting and am curious how that will figure into his sentencing. I'm guessing he gets a public defender, pleads out, and disappears into the mental health system. I just hope he doesn't choose to migrate up to Fairbanks.
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau resigns; protesters shout down mayor at City Hall

Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau resigns; protesters shout down mayor at City Hall | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau resigned abruptly Friday amid growing criticism from the public and the City Council following the fatal police shooting of Justine Damond.

The chief’s departure came at the request of Mayor Betsy Hodges, who promptly nominated Assistant Chief Medaria Arradondo, a 28-year veteran of the force, to replace Harteau. The move ended Harteau’s 4½-year run as the first woman and first openly gay person to head the department.

The death of Damond, a native Australian who had moved to Minneapolis to be with her fiancé, thrust Minneapolis into the international spotlight. It also has generated public skepticism about the department and its training, including from city officials who have questioned why the officers involved didn’t turn on their body cameras.
Rob Duke's insight:
It's a tough business for Chiefs when one of their officers is involved in a questionable shooting.
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Joe Dugan's comment, July 24, 1:31 AM
It's a tough job being Chief or Commissioner of a police department on a good day. However when your officer(s) have been involved in questionable shootings, it's even a worse job. However they serve at the pleasure of the Mayor. This Mayor lost confidence in the police chief, and definitely lost the confidence of the people. Hopefully some fresh eyes can take this hostile situation and diffuse it enough so that the people can respect and trust their police once again.
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51,000 ER injuries due to police officers each year

51,000 ER injuries due to police officers each year | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The majority of injuries suffered by patients during an encounter with law enforcement were rated as minor or moderate by ER personnel.
Rob Duke's insight:
So, if the cops aren't "beating" more people--what's going on with the angst about the police?

Is this data faulty?
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Jenna's comment, July 23, 11:38 PM
I know there are a few people that get harassed and get into brawls with the police every year that is unavoidable, however i feel that many of the patients are probably trying to get some type of money for their "injuries."
Joe Dugan's comment, July 24, 1:39 AM
The respect for our uniformed officers has gone down nationwide. With this respect gone down, we see a lot more of people refusing to do what officers tell you to do. Resisting will result in negative ways for the party involved. Police are taught certain tactics, however when people don't comply there are consequences. I have seen it multiple times where people have become verbally aggressive and combative with officers when asked to provide identification. After the situation is diffused by the officers, when sitting back and reliving it, much of the headaches could have been avoided by just handing over your id. However it's the mentality and attitude of this civil unrest that is causing this. Sad.
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Woman Says Police Threw Boyfriend off Bridge, Body Cam Proves That's a Lie

Woman Says Police Threw Boyfriend off Bridge, Body Cam Proves That's a Lie | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Facebook post slamming Rainbow City Police was proven false when the department released body camera footage.
Rob Duke's insight:
I know every officer has a story like this...we call it the 30 year plan, but it's just karma repackaged.  The idea is that there's no reason to "beat" someone because in the 30 years that you will work as a cop, chances are that they will be in trouble again and you'll get the last laugh without having to "do" anything to him.  And, if he doesn't get in more trouble, then "god bless" and wish him well.
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Joe Dugan's comment, July 16, 8:18 PM
This is why we need bodycams. Not for the corrupt police, but for the fact that there are so many people out there that are trying to get their 15 minutes of fame. I'm surprised nothing happened to this person for posting this false information. I give this guy credit though, he fell 19 feet to his face, and still was able to resist enough to get tased. Someone REALLY didn't want to go back to prison.
Jenna's comment, July 23, 11:45 PM
Thank goodness for body cameras! I really don't think police want to physically abuse people or have the need to. This is why i think we need body cameras because then it won't just be the cops word against the citizen, it will have proof in video footage.
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The Commerce Police Chief Who Arrested Miss Black Texas has Resigned

The Commerce Police Chief Who Arrested Miss Black Texas has Resigned | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Commerce ISD trustee who started the confrontation resigned as well.
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john's comment, July 14, 1:52 PM
What kind of questions was Crews asking Ponder? They wanted her to make an apology for simply saying Beane's teenager should not be driving. This quickly escalated when Ponder was not obeying orders as she being questioned. If this happened between ordinary people it would of been shaken off but it wasn't because Beane's was off duty. I wonder if there was security footage in the Wal-Mart parking lot to show the events of Ponder getting cut off. I think this event was unnecessary for Ponder to get arrested over this dispute.
Phillip Hill's curator insight, July 24, 12:33 AM
I am uncertain to the exact details to this segment article. I have read the article and have reviewed the video, but I do not fully comprehend or understand all of the exact accounts that led to this woman being arrested up. Apparently, there was a disturbance between two drivers that initially made it to Walmart after the driving incident. One of the drivers that was allegedly cut off by the other pedestrian, identified themselves as an off-duty police officer. The off-duty police officer told the civilian that they are being detained until a police officer in uniform arrives. The details are sketchy but nevertheless the fault that I see from the officer’s perspective is, calling the female civilian a bitch. If the word black bitch was used, then this was even worse but in the police statement/report it appears that the word bitch was definitely used. There was no excess of force used for this civilian did not pose any threat or any immediate threat. Not all civilians understand proper procedure and protocols and not all civilians will obey and follow off-duty police officers, in such regards. The civilian should have contacted the police instead of a lawyer and waited until the uniform police officer arrived. The civilian would not of lost any power or control in the situation for they were just being detained. The civilian should have waited for the uniform police officer to arrive so the civilian had their chance to explain the story and the situation.
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VIDEO: Fight in Los Angeles McDonalds - Calibre Press

VIDEO: Fight in Los Angeles McDonalds - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
From ABC7.com:  A fight broke out between a few people and a security guard at a Santa Monica McDonald’s early Wednesday morning, and it was all captured on video. The fight happened at the McDonald’s on 2nd and Colorado streets around 5 a.m., according to the witness who recorded the incident. The witness said fights …
Rob Duke's insight:
"You're travelling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind; a journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of imagination. That's the signpost up ahead - your next stop, the Twilight Zone!"  Rod Sterling

I didn't think we'd see this lawlessness in my lifetime.
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Joe Dugan's comment, July 16, 8:24 PM
Thank God there is still good people out there in this world. This would have been a whole lot worse for that security officer if they were not there to intervene between him and these thugs.
Phillip Hill's curator insight, July 18, 1:24 AM
Upon reviewing this video there are several discrepancies on both ends. First off, the people that the security guard went to inform them of trespassing for consuming alcoholic beverages inside a restaurant without ordering food is justifiable. Would with this verdict have become different if the individuals had ordered food while still drinking alcohol? I am uncertain on how to exactly answer this question based upon many different circumstances upon these types of situations. Immediately the individuals were at fault for consuming alcohol at this restaurant without initially purchasing any food. I did not see the beginning of the video for it started to record towards the beginning, middle of the incident. The fault from the individuals is by fighting the security guard and not leaving the restaurant when the security guard asked them to do so. Another fault from the individuals is by not purchasing any food within the restaurant in which most restaurants do not allow outside sources of food or beverages inside a restaurant. The proper procedure and protocol that the security guard did not follow is by attacking many different individuals randomly. The security officer should have stood his ground and performed a 360-angled view of the whole entire vicinity and area, while establishing threats, while implementing contingencies to establish the threat. The fact that the security guard fell on the floor multiple times is a catastrophic event that can lead to multiple injuries upon the security guard. The security guard should have stood his ground and assess the situation while holding his can of mace spray while asking the individuals to leave. The security guard should have never wounded up on the ground and should have never persuaded to still fight into the altercation, to still fight the individuals. The security guard should have performed more of an affirmative action in regards to his own personal safety.
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NYPD cop-killer Alexander Bonds posted anti-police Facebook rant

NYPD cop-killer Alexander Bonds posted anti-police Facebook rant | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"Police is f----ts, and this ain't no gimmick," Bonds opened an 11-minute Facebook Live video.
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john's comment, July 14, 2:11 PM
Bonds life choices and criminal life style made him commit this crime. He had racked up a criminal record and had many encounters with police and courts fueling his anger. With criminals like him, how could we improve his behavior? The article states that Bonds visited a psychiatrist for his behavior towards cops despite being off the radar of NYPD for four years. How can we prevent this from happening again?
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Judge in Philando Castile case writes letter to jurors

Judge in Philando Castile case writes letter to jurors | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The judge who presided over the case against the police officer who shot Philando Castile has written a letter of support to the jurors who acquitted him, saying there was "a failure to understand what you were asked to do" by the public and media outlets.

The June 16 decision to acquit Saint Anthony, Minnesota, police officer Jeronimo Yanez was met with widespread criticism after dash cam footage showed him shooting at 32-year-old Castile seven times in quick succession during a routine traffic stop. Castile was hit five times, according to court records.

Castile had told 29-year-old Yanez that he had a legal firearm in his possession, and Yanez asked him not to reach for the gun. Castile said he was not pulling the gun out, but seconds later, Yanez shot Castile while his girlfriend and her 4-year-old daughter watched in horror. Castile's girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, broadcast the aftermath of the July 2016 shooting via Facebook Live.

A mostly-white jury of five women and seven men ultimately moved to acquit Yanez of second-degree manslaughter and two counts of intentional discharge of a firearm that endangers safety.
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Federal officer indicted, suspected of kicking handcuffed man in the head in Pomona

A federal officer was charged Thursday with kicking a handcuffed man in the head in 2016 in Pomona.Jason Michael Rouswell, 46, who lives in Los Angeles’ El Sereno neighborhood, was charged with one count of deprivation of rights under color of authority.

Rob Duke's insight:
Doesn't look good....
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Number of fatal shootings by police is nearly identical to last year

Number of fatal shootings by police is nearly identical to last year | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Fewer unarmed people have been killed in 2017, but fatal shootings are on track for 1,000.
Rob Duke's insight:
It's a statistical example of Regression Towards the Mean.  We'd expect the number to be about the same every year with a few outliers that show up less than 5 years out of an entire century of records (you might have an upward trend if population increases or some economic or social patterns).
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Punta Gorda Police Chief found not guilty in trial

Punta Gorda Police Chief found not guilty in trial | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
PUNTA GORDA, Fla. -- A jury found Punta Gorda Police Chief Tom Lewis not guilty of culpable negligence in the death of Mary Knowlton last August. 
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Witnesses to fatal Punta Gorda police shooting testify at chief's trial

Punta Gorda's police chief is fighting to stay out of jail.

Chief Tom Lewis is charged with culpable negligence in the death of Mary Knowlton even though he didn't pull the trigger.

His officer, Lee Coel, claims he thought his gun was loaded with blanks instead of bullets during a "shoot don't shoot" exercise at a Chamber of Commerce event in August.

In the second day of the chief's trial, the state points to Lewis, saying he's responsible because he's the leader of the department.

The defense argued there's a lot of responsibility to go around.

Taking the stand Monday were witnesses that include Knowlton's husband, law enforcement, and investigators.

The question at the center of it all: Did the chief do something criminal that left a 73-year-old retired librarian dead?

The state says Lewis was one line of defense in preventing Knowlton's death.

"Many things went wrong, but we're here because of the role Tom Lewis took," said Assistant State Attorney Stephanie Russell.
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Family of Philando Castile reaches $3M settlement with city

Family of Philando Castile reaches $3M settlement with city | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Family of Philando Castile reaches $3M settlement with city
Rob Duke's insight:
While a jury couldn't find the officer guilty, the civil system was always likely to hold the City liable.  This settlement suggests that the City wasn't sure a jury wouldn't award significant damages.
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Bethany M's comment, July 15, 12:41 PM
This family will never be the same. I’m glad that they were given this settlement. However, I still cannot comprehend how this officer wasn’t found guilty. From everything that I’ve read, and all the videos I’ve watched (from the girlfriends live FB video to the officer’s dash cam video) I thought the jury would have easily found him guilty. There must be some piece of information I’m missing, or something I’m not understanding here. Did the officer not hear Philando when he said he wasn’t pulling out his firearm? Should Philando have told the officer where the firearm was when he said he had one? (So the officer didn’t think he was reaching for his gun.) I am so saddened by this tragic occurrence, and I do think the officer should be held responsible for his actions. However, whenever I am pulled over I always have my license, registration, and insurance in my hand before the officer even approaches my car so that I don’t have to make the officer feel uncomfortable while I reach over to my glove compartment to grab my papers. If I had a concealed carry permit, I would have that ready in my hands too before the officer ever approached my car.
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California’s boldest pension reform, five years in - Capitol Weekly

California’s boldest pension reform, five years in - Capitol Weekly | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
San Diegans voted five years ago to switch all new city hires, except police, from pensions to 401(k)-style individual investment plans.
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Phillip Hill's curator insight, July 24, 12:32 AM
I believe initiating mandatory 401(k) plans for all new hires of police officers, firefighters, and other public services, is an excellent initiative for the implications and well-beings of retirement plans. California is one of the biggest states in the country and it is imperative that California operates on a substantial level. To initiate mandatory 401(k) plans, I believe will help overall prospectively, the retirement plans for millions of Californians in the upcoming futures. There has to be a level of security in retirement planning for the millions of Americans that perform into their governmental role relations. I believe this is a very smart and initiative action that California has taken to initiate 401(k) plans for the mandatory governmental personnel that this initiative actions applies to.
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For Fairer Courts, Address Prosecutor Bias

For Fairer Courts, Address Prosecutor Bias | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Many experts and politicians believe there is, as Hillary Clinton has said repeatedly, “systematic racism throughout the criminal justice system.” As recently as the first presidential debate, Hillary Clinton made this point a hallmark of her criminal justice agenda. She claimed that to address this disparity and implicit bias, she has earmarked money in her initial budget for “retraining
Rob Duke's insight:
So, some researched surfaced last week that the cops may no longer be a significant source of bias (see Harvard study article below).  If that's true, but we're still seeing systemic inequalities--then, where do we look for the answer?  Some suggest that prosecutorial discretion is now a greater source of inequality--what do you think?
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Phillip Hill's curator insight, July 24, 12:33 AM
Is there systematic racism throughout the criminal justice system? To answer this question simply is absolutely. The United States is most definitely infiltrated by a systematic racism throughout the criminal justice system. This country has gone through a lot of racial tensions between slavery, captivity, abolishment of slavery, the Civil War, the civil rights movement, to the political Reform era, to help alleviate racial tensions throughout America. These are all forms of systematic racism for the betterment of society, and for the acknowledgment of racial tensions throughout America. Perhaps a few hundred years in the future, racial tensions may not be as high as of today, but this is an important factor to implement because the civil rights movement was just over 60 years ago. It was just over 70 years ago that African-Americans were not able to sit in the front of a public bus. Prior to that, female citizens of the United States did not even have the right to vote within America. Based upon all of these determining factors, systematic racism is still very active and alive within the American system and especially within the criminal justice judicial system. In my perception, it is difficult for a country to believe that after enslaving millions of people, that those people will have no negative effects against the country that first initially enslaved them.
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Surprising New Evidence Shows Bias in Police Use of Force but Not in Shootings

Surprising New Evidence Shows Bias in Police Use of Force but Not in Shootings | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Contradicting conventional wisdom: When it comes to the most lethal form of force, a study finds no racial bias.
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Jenna's comment, July 23, 11:42 PM
Shooting is a whole different level than everything below it that involves use of force. Many have a preferred method but not many would say shooting is their preferred method to make people comply. If they did then they should probably get kicked out.
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How do you do #LESM? (with images, tweets) · PolicingNews

Troopers are showing the way -- through engagement
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One dead in officer-involved shooting in Plant City

One dead in officer-involved shooting in Plant City | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

PLANT CITY, Fla. - The Plant City Police Department is investigating an officer-involved shooting that took place on Thursday morning.

When police received a call around 5 a.m., the caller advised dispatchers that he was in need of police service and was being chased by unknown subjects for the past two hours.

When officers responded to the area, they attempted to gather information of where the cell phone information was coming from and worked to try to find the vehicle.

One officer found a suspicious vehicle and the driver of that vehicle tried to run over the police officer. Officers followed the vehicle to the BP Gas Station on Park Road and Alsobrook Street in Plant City. According to police, the vehicle's tires were deflated in an attempt to disable it. After the vehicle's tires were deflated, the driver failed to stop the vehicle and crashed. Officers then surrounded the vehicle and instructed the driver to get out and show his hands.

Police say that the driver ignored officers and tried to grab an unknown object. Officers were in fear of their life and two officers fired at the driver, according to police. During a press conference, Sergeant Alfred Van Duyne stated that the driver was “neutralized.”

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At least 76 police officers injured in G-20 protests in Germany

At least 76 police officers injured in G-20 protests in Germany | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
One suffered an eye wound from a firecracker, police said.
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Radio transmission of NYPD officer that was assassinated

Radio transmission of NYPD officer that was assassinated | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police say a New York City officer who was shot while sitting in her patrol car has died in what they’re calling a “clear assassination.”
Police Sgt. Brendan Ryan says 48-year-old Officer Miosotis Familia died at a hospital early Wednesday.
Police say other officers shot and killed the suspect after he drew a revolver on them. They say a person believed to be a bystander was struck by a bullet and is in stable condition.
The attack happened in the Bronx around 12:30 a.m. while the officer was sitting in her vehicle with her partner. Her partner radioed for help. Other officers spotted the suspect and began chasing him.
The suspect has been identified as 34-year-old Alexander Bonds.
Ryan says police are unaware of any connection between Bonds and Familia.
Rob Duke's insight:
The audio of the radio call is pretty intense....
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Police respond to call, end up joining in on Slip 'N Slide

Police respond to call, end up joining in on Slip 'N Slide | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police respond to call, end up joining in on Slip 'N Slide
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Rockford police, Winnebago County Sheriff: Body cameras too 'cost prohibitive'

Rockford police, Winnebago County Sheriff: Body cameras too 'cost prohibitive' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“They’ll give you the camera,” Rockford Police Assistant Deputy Chief Doug Pann said of distributors. “It’s the data storage. It’s not feasible to store the data ourselves.”

Sheriff Gary Caruana added: “We’re not opposed to them. They tell both sides of the story, but I don’t know how we would do it. It’s cost prohibitive.”
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Gunman Called Police Shootings a ‘Necessary Evil’ in a Suicide Note

Gunman Called Police Shootings a ‘Necessary Evil’ in a Suicide Note | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

The man who opened fire last summer on law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge, La., killing two policemen and a deputy sheriff, carried out his ambush “to create substantial change within America’s police force and judicial system,” according to a suicide note that investigators released on Friday.

In a handwritten letter that ran to a third page, the gunman, Gavin Long, said his attack was “a necessary evil” that he hoped would compel “good” law enforcement officers to confront wrongdoing and misconduct in American policing.

“Therefore I must bring the same destruction that bad cops continue to inflict upon my people, upon bad cops as well as good cops in hopes that the good cops (which are the majority) will be able to stand together to enact justice & punishment against bad cops b/c right now the police force & current judicial system is not doing so,” Mr. Long, 29, wrote in the letter, which the authorities retrieved from his car after the assault on July 17, 2016.

Near the end of the letter, Mr. Long praised certain officers by name — their identities were redacted — as well as “every other officer who stands up & protects & serves, and upholds their oath, even if its protecting the people from one of their fellow officers.”

The suicide note of Mr. Long, who was killed by the police, was included in the trove of evidence that the authorities made public at the end of their use-of-force inquiry. No officers will be charged in connection with Mr. Long’s death, a conclusion that was never in serious doubt in the Louisiana capital.

Rob Duke's insight:
Anomie.....a feeling of normlessness and loss of control.  Does that sound right?
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Joe Dugan's comment, July 2, 7:19 PM
It's a sad day where you read a note that spells out this character was lost morally along the way. I don't blame police for his thinking or his actions, however, what feeds the mindset like this? Mainstream media. We can argue for days over this, however all you read is how there is a breakdown of social bonds between the "corrupt" police and the people. The good new about what police officers are doing for the communities are so overshadowed by few bad acts. I don't think we should ignore these bad acts, but we should be able to hear about both, instead of getting all negative shoved down our throats till something like this happens. Sad society we live in right now.
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Three high-profile police shooting trials ended this past week. Here’s what happened

Three high-profile police shooting trials ended this past week. Here’s what happened | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Three police brutality trials concluded this week, all of them without a conviction for the officers involved.
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Second Mistrial Declared in Ray Tensing Murder Case

Second Mistrial Declared in Ray Tensing Murder Case | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A second mistrial was declared on Friday in the murder case of former University of Cincinnati officer Ray Tensing, reports the Associated Press.

Tensing fatally shot Sam DuBose, an unarmed black man, during a traffic stop on July 19, 2015.

Tensing testified in his own defense during both trials, claiming he was forced to fire his weapon after being dragged by DuBose’s car as he attempted to speed away.

“I meant to stop the threat. I didn’t shoot to kill him. I didn’t shoot to wound him. I shot to stop his actions,” Tensing said during the second trial.

After body camera footage was reviewed prior to the first trial, it was determined that Tensing was justified in stopping the vehicle but not in using deadly force. Tensing fired his weapon once, shooting DuBose in the head.

Reports show Tensing made the most traffic stops and arrests in his department. He also gave out the most citations and had the highest racial disparity in traffic stops of all University of Cincinnati officers.

“Ray was an aggressive police officer as he was instructed to be because UC had a crime problem,” stated Stew Mathews, Tensing’s attorney.


Related: What to do When Scandal Strikes Your Department
The first mistrial was declared back in November after 25 hours of deliberation when the jury deadlocked at 8-4 in favor of a charge less severe than murder.
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Prosecutors use Joe Arpaio's immigration talk against him

Prosecutors use Joe Arpaio's immigration talk against him | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Former Sheriff Joe Arpaio's criminal trial opened Monday over his defiance of the courts in traffic patrols that targeted immigrants, marking the most aggressive effort to hold the former lawman of metro Phoenix accountable for tactics that critics say racially profiled Latinos.

In opening arguments, prosecutors displayed comments Arpaio made in news releases and during TV interviews in which he bragged about immigration enforcement, aiming to prove that he should be found guilty of misdemeanor contempt of court.

"He thought he could get away with it," prosecutor Victor Salgado said, adding that at least 170 were illegally detained because Arpaio didn't stop. "He never thought this day would come."

Arpaio's defense lawyer vigorously disputed that a person with nearly 60 years in law enforcement would violate a court order, putting the blame on a former attorney who gave bad legal advice.
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