Police Problems and Policy
9.8K views | +4 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Rob Duke
onto Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

South African policemen arrested, to face murder charges

South African policemen arrested, to face murder charges | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
PRETORIA (Reuters) - Eight South African policemen have been arrested on suspicion of murder after dragging a man tied to the back of a police truck through a busy Johannesburg street in an incident broadcast...
more...
Albert Svensson's comment, March 5, 2013 10:39 AM
This is a heart breaking article, to think that things like this are still going on in countries like this is horrible; not that this couldn’t happen in the U.S. but the cruelty and lack of shame by the officers to do such a thing in front of witnesses is unimaginable. I know they are a developing country and have not had a police force for a long time but the number incidents that they have had is horrific. I can't understand why the U.S has not reached out to help the situation. There needs to be some major changes to the police force in South Africa.
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Man tasered by police dies in hospital after 'slashing himself'

Man tasered by police dies in hospital after 'slashing  himself' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

A man has died following an incident in which he was tasered by police.

Reports last night said he was "slashing himself" with a knife in Falmouth.

The police have just issue
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Police chief resigns when confronted about his involvement in “mock tickets”

Police chief resigns when confronted about his involvement in “mock tickets” | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Fox 2 News learned from Ware that the tickets demanding payment were just pretend. Ware called them “mock tickets.” Uplands Park and Kinloch even called them “warnings,” but you wouldn’t know it just by looking at them.

So why would a police chief in one town get involved with speed traps in another municipality? The Fox Files obtained a document which offers a clue. It's Colonel Cliff Ware's resume from 2015. He listed a current employer as Automated Transportation Enforcement Solutions (ATES ). Ware listed that he was paid by “commission” and supervised by John Baine, the man behind the security cop radar operation.

Baine told Fox 2 News in April that his critics were all wrong about the speed trap operation.

“They have an agenda and what we offer the small communities is an opportunity for equal protection,” he said.
Rob Duke's insight:
In later readings, we'll see that one of the things Muir cautions against is focusing too hard on the power of the sword (coercion).  This article and video is a good example of this: everyone focuses on the police (moonlighting cop, in this case) and no one asks what the attorneys got out of the case.  The ticket company offers a service where they write "warning" tickets and the attorneys were paid to stop this from happening.  Attorneys that get into the fight are also part of the problem.  There's certainly a public policy issue about using a company to write warnings when the warnings look a little too much like tickets, but the attorneys also got paid for getting involved.
So, the power of persuasion (word) in this case is also suspect, but we focused on coercion and not on the word.
Muir also cautions to be careful of the power of the purse (reciprocity).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The County: the story of America's deadliest police

The County: the story of America's deadliest police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Guardian series examines Kern County, California, where police have killed more people per capita than anywhere else in the US this year
Rob Duke's insight:
a. the Atlantic is very liberal, thus you must take their articles with that in mind;
b. California has the largest population and the most officers in the U.S.; and\
c. I worked the central valley and it's as violent as Los Angeles--if not more so.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Shared sacrifice and real compromise save the Dallas police pension — for now | Editorials | Dallas News

Shared sacrifice and real compromise save the Dallas police pension — for now | Editorials | Dallas News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Victory has a hundred fathers, the saying goes, so there’s a lot of credit to pass around for the rescue of the Dallas Police and Fir
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Dashcams capture moment before accused serial killer's deadly shootout with Anchorage police

In the video, James Dale Ritchie can be seen ignoring police officer Arn Salao's commands to stop. Suddenly, he turns and walks toward Salao's patrol car.
Rob Duke's insight:
Would you bar officers from making these "investigative stops"?  The ACLU makes an argument that these are not Constitutional--what do you think?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Caught On Video: Woman, 76, Forcibly Removed From Union Station Reserved Seats

Caught On Video: Woman, 76, Forcibly Removed From Union Station Reserved Seats | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A woman was caught on video being forcibly removed from reserved seating at Union Station, and the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department says they are investigating the arrest.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

FBI is not involved in Seth Rich case despite 'conspiracy theories,' officials say

FBI is not involved in Seth Rich case despite 'conspiracy theories,' officials say | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FBI is not involved in Seth Rich case despite 'conspiracy theories,' officials say
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Connecticut House Unanimously Approves Conviction Requirement for Civil Forfeiture - Institute for Justice

Connecticut House Unanimously Approves Conviction Requirement for Civil Forfeiture - Institute for Justice | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Between 2009 and 2013, local and state law enforcement carried out 3,750 civil forfeiture cases—more than three-quarters of all forfeiture cases.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Informant says he was planted in Orange County jail to snitch

Informant says he was planted in Orange County jail to snitch | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Mark Cleveland tells 60 Minutes he shaved 40 years off his sentence by becoming a jailhouse informant for Orange County law enforcement officials, now under investigation
Rob Duke's insight:
Snitches always have their own interests....never have I never seen these interests align with the interests of the community or justice.
more...
Jenna's comment, May 22, 5:13 PM
This is interesting to see. I have read countless stories and articles of what happens to snitches and rats when they talk to the police as well as the other side of the line where law enforcement personnel cross the blue code of silence. I agree, it is extremely rare to see these individuals snitch for the betterment of others and not gain any personal benefits from doing so.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Analysis of police shootings raises awareness

Analysis of police shootings raises awareness | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
This week, The Sun and Southern California Public Radio released an important analysis of police shootings in San Bernardino County.

Despite having more than two million residents in the most expansive county in the country, relatively little has been known about police shootings in the county. At the very least, the public deserves to know how often and under what circumstances those who swear an oath to protect and serve their community resort to shooting people.

Based on records from January 2010 through December 2015, it was found that at least 103 people were shot by police in that time period. One in four were unarmed. African-Americans were shot disproportionately to their population. More than 70 percent of those shot by police showed signs of drug or alcohol intoxication. And curiously, officers in San Bernardino County were found to shoot into moving vehicles at nearly double the rate of officers in Los Angeles County.
Rob Duke's insight:
Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Chicago police finalize tighter rules on when to shoot, other uses of force

Chicago police finalize tighter rules on when to shoot, other uses of force | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"Three Chicago police officers have been shot in the last two weeks. The reality is that many offenders do not want to go to jail and they become resistant or combative with officers. These violators determine the level of response by officers," Graham said in a written statement.

"For these reasons, we do not believe that extensive changes should made to the current use of force policy. Nevertheless, we are always willing to discuss new measures with the superintendent that insure the safety of our officers and those of the public," the statement read.

Johnson, meanwhile, said the department can't compromise on either officer safety or residents' rights.

"I'm not naive. I know that there will be some who will think that these policies are too restrictive for officers to do their jobs, and there will be some who think it isn't restrictive enough," he said.

"However, I do believe that the set of policies we are releasing today is in the best interest of everyone," he said.
Rob Duke's insight:
In the end, I don't see much change.  This falls back on the Paradox of Proximity; and the Paradox of the Condemned Prisoner.
In proximity, local governance and public safety are the only government representatives who are so close to the community that they must look into victim's eyes as the crime has been committed.  They also must deal with those who directly own property and the businesses of the "growth engine".  These are both powerful forces to influence behavior.  No doubt, these forces complained vociferously when they thought their police were being muzzled.
In the condemned prisoner paradox, even the condemned prisoner gets a say in his own execution (blindfold, cigarette, last meal), thus it's not unreasonable for an officer who might  be killed to have some say in their manner of (possible) death.  Otherwise, you'd start to find it hard to attract people to the business. In other words, while I may be willing to lay down my life, I want it to be for the best possible reasons; and, I want it to be because there was truly no other way.  The trade off is that I don't want rules that force me to lay down my life because of a pedantic reading of the rules.  The rules must be based off the natural law that if someone is attempting to harm others, they chose to have forced used against them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Investigation: Savannah airport police illegally used radar guns

Investigation: Savannah airport police illegally used radar guns | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In May 2016, Georgia Department of Public Safety began investigating allegations that the Airport Police Department was using radar equipment without a state-issued permit, according to the report.

Georgia State Code lists three agencies, aside from the Georgia State Patrol, that are allowed to use Speed Detection Devices on Georgia roads. Airport Police are not listed as an agency that can obtain one of these state-issue permits.
Rob Duke's insight:
A growing number of officers are being reported with thyroid cancer, and one possible link: use of radar.
If it were me, I'd not use radar.  If you do use it, make sure to have your thyroid checked every couple years and monitor it yourself by feeling your throat area around and above the Adam's Apple.  There shouldn't be any bumps in the area.

p.s. I survived Stage IV thyroid cancer.  It's no fun and your body will never be the same once you've had it.  You have no idea until you lose it about how important the thyroid is to feeling well and having energy.
more...
Jenna's comment, May 22, 5:30 PM
First of all, Congratulations to Professor Duke for his survival of Stage IV thyroid cancer! Thank you for the advice, it is not something to be taken lightly. I did not know that officers are developing thyroid cancer from the use of radar. This is extremely important to know. As for the article, it is interesting to see that the PD would use radar without a permit. Usually, from my experience, a PD tries to follow the rules in order to set a good example as well as build good relations with the public.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Pierce Murphy, head of Seattle police’s civilian watchdog, stepping down

Pierce Murphy, head of Seattle police’s civilian watchdog, stepping down | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Pierce Murphy, who was appointed director of the Seattle Police Department’s Office of Professional Accountability in 2013, was seen as boosting public trust in the department’s internal investigations and discipline during his tenure.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

St. Louis police are overcharging public for arrest reports, judge rules

St. Louis police are overcharging public for arrest reports, judge rules | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The St. Louis Police Department has been violating the state’s open records law by overcharging for and improperly maintaining police reports, a St. Louis judge has ruled.

St. Louis Circuit Judge Robert Dierker’s order in a lawsuit filed last year by the American Civil Liberties Union says the department has violated the law by requiring citizens pay a flat fee of $6.50 for each police report and failing to distinguish between an “incident report” and an “arrest report.”

Dierker’s order says the department must start providing arrest reports to the public at 10 cents a page plus the cost of a staff member’s time to produce them.

The judge said “the department was attempting to charge an unnecessarily high fee for producing records because the department chose not to keep records in a manner conforming” to the Sunshine Law.

City counselor Michael Garvin said the department has staff assigned solely to handle an “enormous” volume of Sunshine Law requests, and the practice of charging a flat fee was so the department didn’t have to calculate a separate fee for each request.

“We weren’t trying to gouge the public,” Garvin said. “This really was intended to make it easier for everyone. Obviously, we’ll have to comply with the judge’s ruling. The law isn’t always convenient. I guess this is going to be one of those cases.”

The lawsuit was filed last June by the ACLU after the department charged Mustafa Abdullah, an ACLU employee, a fee of $1,377 for 138 arrest reports he had requested. The suit said the fee the department quoted was $897 for the reports — $6.50 each regardless of the number of pages — plus a prepayment of $480 for an estimated 32 hours of research time needed to strip out some information.
Rob Duke's insight:
Another case of Power of the Purse and Power of the Word.
$6.50 for a police report isn't an unfair burden.  The judge requires a calculation for each report, but it's equally reasonable to say: ok, for most report requests, it's a matter of they all take about the same time: 5 min. to search; 2 min. to print, plus .10 a page for the paper....but, what about the time that we pay the person(s) to sit around at the counter waiting for people to come in?  Shouldn't the report requesters pay a fair share for the electricity, building costs, and salary of the person who fills that position?  In which case, wouldn't it be reasonable to say, we calculate that as .10 a page, plus $6 for overhead and we'll round it off to a flat $6.50?

We charged $10 for traffic accidents and tow reports, and research for multiple cases.  This seems like a reasonable policy to me.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Greenville police credit Cops and Barbers program with improved community relations

Greenville police credit Cops and Barbers program with improved community relations | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police and community relations have been in the spotlight a lot in recent years, especially with the black community.

In Eastern Carolina, police in one city say there's been a big improvement all thanks to a program started last summer.

Beyond a shave or a haircut, the local barbershop has also always served as a place for people to gather and have an open conversation about real-life problems.

That is why Greenville officers felt it was the perfect place to begin an outreach, known as Cops and Barbers, with the end goal of improving communications.

"All the issues that our customers have problems with, they have been addressed during one of our meetings and the officers try their best to take a look at the issue and to put the best solution they have to it," says Rodney Harris, the manager at Rodney's Barber Shop.

Since the program started in July of 2016, 11 barbershops in total have joined in, hanging maps that explain where and why police monitor certain areas and passing out little cards to patrons that have tips and advice on how to handle being stopped by an officer.


Now barbers are serving as an intermediary between the community and the police.

"It's paying dividends for us," says Chief Mark Holtzman, with the Greenville Police Department.

Chief Holtzman says the program has been working. Complaints against officers in the communities they serve are down this year, something they directly attribute to the program.

They believe going forward, the most important thing will be keeping an open dialog.

"I see the program growing by leaps and bounds, once the community gets to know what we're doing, hopefully they'll start bringing more issues to the table," says Officer Richie Williams, who is in charge of Cops and Barbers Community Outreach.

As for the community, the program has allowed for a more honest conversation to take place, providing an outlet for people to express their concerns, sharing experiences they've had and offering feedback as to how they feel.

"To me, as people, our job is to be treated... treat them with respect so they can treat you with respect, and in the long run, let's just all get along," says Rubye Harris, a community member.

As for the Cops and Barbers program, police say this is just the beginning.

During the meeting, officers also shared with community members a number of initiatives they're introducing to better serve the area, including body cameras that all officers will soon be wearing and a fair and impartial police training program they have enrolled in.
Rob Duke's insight:
This looks to be very innovative...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Why California Is a Case Study for Monitoring Police Misconduct

Why California Is a Case Study for Monitoring Police Misconduct | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

One policy currently being debated among police-reform advocates is the adoption of a statute that would allow state attorneys general to investigate and mandate structural changes within troubled departments, just as the federal Justice Department can. These changes can vary, but could include amending a department’s use-of-force policy or requiring bias training. The proposal has its origins in California, as it is the only state in the country that explicitly authorizes its attorney general to intervene in this way.

William Lockyer was the first California attorney general to exercise that power, after four Riverside police officers shot and killed a 19-year-old black woman in 1998. The shooting ignited community protests and attracted attention from civil-rights activists Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson. The Riverside County district attorney invited Lockyer to review the evidence and circumstances of the case.

“I think it makes sense to have some external review, whether federal or state, as a way to check local politics and pressures.”
Though the state did not have enough to bring criminal charges against the officers, Lockyer told me, he launched a civil-rights investigation into the Riverside Police Department’s policies and practices. In 2001, he filed a judgment forcing the department to implement specific reforms within a five-year period. The changes included using more experienced officers on overnight shifts and implementing community policing: assigning officers to monitor specific neighborhoods on a long-term basis and build trust with residents.

“The police chief and many others said after the fact that this was the best thing to ever happen to the Riverside Police Department; it really professionalized the force,” Lockyer said. “I think it makes sense to have some external review, whether federal or state, as a way to check local politics and pressures that can stand in the way of reform.”

The Riverside reform agreement presents one case study to examine stronger state intervention in local policing, but state oversight is not an easy fix. The California attorney general has had intervention authority for 16 years, but has only used it a handful of times. That includes investigations launched in December 2016 by then-state attorney general and current U.S. Senator Kamala Harris. Even police-reform researchers who say these statutes have potential acknowledge they can run into problems when it comes to execution.

Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of the University of California, Irvine, School of Law, said he suspects that political pressures and ambitions deter California attorneys general from exercising their authority more frequently. University of Virginia law professor Rachel Harmon suggested state funding might also present a barrier. “I don’t think mirroring the federal statute, section 14141, is likely to be the most successful state reform effort,” Harmon said, referring to the order granted by Clinton’s 1994 crime bill. “It took the federal government a long time to get that train rolling, and I think it’s very unlikely that the resources or expertise exist in most states to engage in a similarly effective effort.”

Rob Duke's insight:
Riverside was already a well-respected P.D. in California.  For the A/G to take credit for that is politically suspect.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Teen commits suicide after police tried to 'scare him straight'

Teen commits suicide after police tried to 'scare him straight' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The family of a 16-year-old who killed himself after police confronted him about a recorded sexual encounter intend to file a lawsuit.
Rob Duke's insight:
What other reasons might there be for this suicide?  Perhaps the police caused this, but often people who are arrested become concerned about what their families will think, or whether they'll lose their job.  The police don't cause these external effects--right?  So, should the police be responsible?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Arkansas Commission says Jerry Jones’ gift to cops was unethical

Arkansas Commission says Jerry Jones’ gift to cops was unethical | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones says he was just trying to show respect to police officers when he gave game tickets, travel accommodations and Cowboys merchandise to cops in his home town of North Little Rock. But the Arkansas Ethics Commission found that the gifts violated state rules.

According to the Dallas Morning News, Jones was found to have committed an unintentional ethical violation. Jones personally attended the Commission’s hearing to say that he merely made the gifts to send a positive message about work police officers do, specifically volunteer work when they’re not on duty.

An Arkansas blogger who monitors bad government in his state filed the ethics complaint.

Jones will be given a written warning for a first offense of an ethical violation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Sheriff’s Department Statement Regarding the Use of Force Investigation at Union Station on May 17, ... from LASD - Los Angeles County Sheriffs Dept Information Bureau (SIB) : Nixle

Sheriff’s Department Statement Regarding the Use of Force Investigation at Union Station on May 17, 2017

On May 17, 2017, at approximately 11:15 p.m., deputies from the Los Angeles Count
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Smoke shop bust will help sheriff's office buy new helicopter

Smoke shop bust will help sheriff's office buy new helicopter | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Federal government discovered Stuffed Pipe Smoke Shops in Fresno, Visalia, and Bakersfield were involved in the sales and distribution of synthetic cannabinoids, but these drugs, in a variety of packaging, were deadly.

"There have been deaths reported, serious bodily injury, and there are extreme psychological effects from taking the drug," said Karen Escobar, Asst. US Attorney.

The substance known as XLR 1 has also been linked to a large number of suicides. The owner of the Stuffed Pipe stores, Victor Nottoli, pleaded guilty to federal charges, connected to 24 tons of the stuff. He forfeited six and a half million dollars in proceeds.

"We are taking the money out, the profit out of crime, and we are putting it back into the community through law enforcement," said Phil Talbert Us Attorney Eastern Dist. CA.

A big check for nearly $2-million was presented to Sheriff Margaret Mims, by the IRS. Mims said the money will be put to good use.

"With this amount of money being deposited we are well on our way to making sure we have the funding to replace our second helicopter in our air enforcement unit."

In addition, to the money the Sheriff's office got a pickup truck seized from Nottoli. He is scheduled to be sentenced next year, and could face life in prison.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Cops and doctors have the same problem: People don't trust them

Cops and doctors have the same problem: People don't trust them | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Hardly a week goes by without hearing about another case of police brutality. Many times, seemingly unnecessarily lethal force has been used, and these incidents have sparked protests across America. Each case is unique with differentiating circumstances, but the result is all too often — death. Many people have grouped these incidents together concluding that white officers have unnecessarily killed black men. This has initiated and reinforced mistrust of the entire police force in many communities. Realistically, the majority of the police force is here to protect and to serve. Nonetheless, in many communities, this trust has eroded and left many with the perception that the police force is simply out to violate the rights of racial, ethnic and religious minorities. For others, images of police dogs and fire hoses of the 60s have been reinforced showing that nothing has changed. Perceptions move quickly from interpersonal mistrust to institutional mistrust.

For health care providers, both types of mistrust can serve as a reminder that we too are subject to the scrutiny of the public. Each of our patients approaches us from a different perspective via various walks of life. Although the vast majority of our profession has very altruistic values while preventing disease and treating illness, episodes of our collective past may negate those values. Malicious medical experimentation including The Tuskegee Experiment or prisoners in Nazi Germany coupled with physicians who publish fictitious research about vaccines and autism could easily provoke mistrust institutionally.
Rob Duke's insight:
In one of Bittner's articles in your later readings, he calls both medicine and policing a "tainted" profession...he means damned if you do and damned if you don't....
Medicine and policing are both responsible for complexity that you don't have the luxury of turning off while you work on it (like replacing an auto part).  Instead, we are called upon to make repairs while the machine is running....which is nigh impossible....
more...
Jenna's comment, May 22, 5:07 PM
Articles like these are always astonishing to read. Law enforcement and medical professionals are supposed to be institutions in which the people can trust and depend on for support. When the people have no trust in these providers, where do they turn to for help and assistance? When there is no trust, this is when there will ultimately cause problems for both parties. The people will with hold information which cause the police and medical personnel to not be able to effectively do their jobs to its full potential.
Bethany M's comment, May 23, 10:49 AM
I thought this article was particularly interesting. In the past year, I’ve taken it upon myself to conduct independent research regarding nutrition and the amount of training medical doctors receive. There are important parallels to be made between these two professions. Most people place an unmeasurable amount of trust in doctors when it comes to nutrition. However, I was surprised to learn that only a quarter of medical schools only offer a single course in nutrition. As if that isn’t bad enough, mainstream medical organizations actually lobby against an increase in nutrition education for doctors. There are also many instances where doctors know that the best “cure” is a lifestyle change, but don’t bother mentioning it to their patients because they don’t believe they would be willing to make such drastic lifestyle changes. (An example of this would be a doctor prescribing their patients medication for high blood pressure, instead of mentioning that they could first try cutting out caffeine and salt and try getting more exercise.) So instead, they prescribe medication. If you ask me, omitting the truth or “cure” to patients should be considered criminal. At the very least, you think they should be required to tell their patients the truth and to allow them the chance to decide whether they would rather try lifestyle changes or medication. However, that is not to say that doctors (or police officers) are genuinely bad people. I agree with the consensus of this article, that many individuals go into these professions with an altruistic type of attitude. Any google search will show that there is no media shortage of articles and videos depicting officers to be corrupt and ruthless abusing deadly force. However, (like doctors), police officers are mostly reacting to standards and guidelines set by Institutions and organizations. Often, the media blames the individuals who are merely reacting to standards that they have no control over. While it may seem bad that doctors often omit simple lifestyle changes in their recommendations to their patients, it’s also important to recognize that it’s not part of the medical training they receive. The only person who truly benefits from lifestyle changes is the patient. So, the system is structured in such a way that doctors are rewarded financially from big pharma to prescribe pills to their patients. Much like doctors, the system put in place for police officers often bares no responsibility by the media and they often demonize the individual who is merely reacting to the system.

References:
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/99/5/1153S.full
https://vimeo.com/23744792
http://drhyman.com/downloads/Lifestyle-Medicine.pdf
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23177484
How Not to Die, by Dr. Michael Greger
nutritionfacts.org

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Racial Bias Lawsuit Against Bennington Police Clears Hurdle

Racial Bias Lawsuit Against Bennington Police Clears Hurdle | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

 A federal judge has rejected a Bennington police request to dismiss a racial bias lawsuit filed by a black man whose drug conviction was overturned by the Vt. Supreme Court.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

VIDEO: Officer Shoots, Kills Man in Midst of Decapitation - Calibre Press

VIDEO: Officer Shoots, Kills Man in Midst of Decapitation - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
From Lufkin Daily News:  A Lufkin Police officer has been no-billed in the March shooting death of an aggravated assault suspect. The incident involving six-year officer Blake Witherspoon was presented to an Angelina County grand jury Tuesday, resulting in a no-bill, according to a Lufkin Police Department press release. A “no-bill” means the grand jury …
Rob Duke's insight:
I post this article just to illustrate the range of truly crazy things officers are likely to deal with in their career.  The video is graphic so just be forewarned if you decide to view it.
more...
Jenna's comment, May 22, 5:23 PM
This video was graphic but it gave me a better insight as to what an officer may encounter during his or her career. It is important to see videos like this not only to build respect for law enforcement personnel, but to be able to take everything into account when deciding if law enforcement is the right career path for you.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Study: Dallas Police Don't Target Minorities, Social Media Distorts Perception

Study: Dallas Police Don't Target Minorities, Social Media Distorts Perception | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A new study debunks the belief that white Dallas police officers use force against blacks and Hispanics disproportionately.

The study was done by researchers at U-T Dallas, the U-T School of Public Health and the University of South Florida, and was based on more than 5,600 reports filed by Dallas police during a two year period.

University of Texas at Dallas’ Alex Piquero says when researchers took into consideration the factors in each incident, the majority of the race, ethnic differences from officer and citizen disappears.

“On average the popular perception that Dallas police are targeting minorities, doesn’t hold up in the data that we have for that two year period,” Piquero says.
Rob Duke's insight:
That syncs up with my experience, as well....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Police Taking New Precautions On Opioid Calls

Police Taking New Precautions On Opioid Calls | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
It used to be that when police officers responded to an opioid overdose, they worried about saving just the victim's live. Now they also have to protect their own.
more...
Jenna's comment, May 22, 5:38 PM
I never knew that just coming into skin contact with Fentanyl can cause someone to overdose. This is scary to think that an officer who comes into contact with this will see the consequences as well as not be able to defend him or herself while being unconscious. I think it is a good idea to wear masks as well and to teach the officers proper handling techniques on drug calls.
Rob Duke's comment, May 23, 8:08 PM
Frightening...PCP is the same way....I supposed LSD in liquid form would be similar, but I've never heard of officers having an accidental LSD exposure.