Police Problems and Policy
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2 police officers killed in Calif.; suspect dead

2 police officers killed in Calif.; suspect dead | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
SANTA CRUZ, Calif. (AP) — Two police detectives were fatally shot when they tried to question a man over a report of a sexual assault, and the man later died after a brief chase, authorities said.
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brian mcdermott's comment, February 28, 2013 1:40 PM
Balace and complacency. When I think of the work assault I think of a violent physical action imposed on someone else. The work assault incites a potential volatile situation and you cannot forget that. Treat everyone as they should be treated, and never get complacent when questioning anyone with a violent history the risk of potential harm is increased maybe not today, tomorrow but at some point.
Jessica Yurkew's comment, February 28, 2013 4:11 PM
This is extremely unfortunate, and a huge reminder that a police officers job can go from routine to dangerous in an instant. It is essential to keep in mind past offenses and deal with those individuals accordingly. The man was clearly disturbed and had some serious past offenses.
Koty Emery's comment, March 4, 2013 4:17 AM
It always saddening when things like this occur. It truly is one of the more dangerous jobs in society. I always take police officers attitudes with more than a grain of salt before taking anything personally because of all things that are running through their heads that could go wrong during a 'routine' traffic stop, or in this case a questioning. Very saddening indeed.
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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FBI is not involved in Seth Rich case despite 'conspiracy theories,' officials say

FBI is not involved in Seth Rich case despite 'conspiracy theories,' officials say | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FBI is not involved in Seth Rich case despite 'conspiracy theories,' officials say
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Connecticut House Unanimously Approves Conviction Requirement for Civil Forfeiture - Institute for Justice

Connecticut House Unanimously Approves Conviction Requirement for Civil Forfeiture - Institute for Justice | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Between 2009 and 2013, local and state law enforcement carried out 3,750 civil forfeiture cases—more than three-quarters of all forfeiture cases.
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Informant says he was planted in Orange County jail to snitch

Informant says he was planted in Orange County jail to snitch | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Mark Cleveland tells 60 Minutes he shaved 40 years off his sentence by becoming a jailhouse informant for Orange County law enforcement officials, now under investigation
Rob Duke's insight:
Snitches always have their own interests....never have I never seen these interests align with the interests of the community or justice.
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Jenna's comment, May 22, 5:13 PM
This is interesting to see. I have read countless stories and articles of what happens to snitches and rats when they talk to the police as well as the other side of the line where law enforcement personnel cross the blue code of silence. I agree, it is extremely rare to see these individuals snitch for the betterment of others and not gain any personal benefits from doing so.
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Analysis of police shootings raises awareness

Analysis of police shootings raises awareness | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
This week, The Sun and Southern California Public Radio released an important analysis of police shootings in San Bernardino County.

Despite having more than two million residents in the most expansive county in the country, relatively little has been known about police shootings in the county. At the very least, the public deserves to know how often and under what circumstances those who swear an oath to protect and serve their community resort to shooting people.

Based on records from January 2010 through December 2015, it was found that at least 103 people were shot by police in that time period. One in four were unarmed. African-Americans were shot disproportionately to their population. More than 70 percent of those shot by police showed signs of drug or alcohol intoxication. And curiously, officers in San Bernardino County were found to shoot into moving vehicles at nearly double the rate of officers in Los Angeles County.
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Chicago police finalize tighter rules on when to shoot, other uses of force

Chicago police finalize tighter rules on when to shoot, other uses of force | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"Three Chicago police officers have been shot in the last two weeks. The reality is that many offenders do not want to go to jail and they become resistant or combative with officers. These violators determine the level of response by officers," Graham said in a written statement.

"For these reasons, we do not believe that extensive changes should made to the current use of force policy. Nevertheless, we are always willing to discuss new measures with the superintendent that insure the safety of our officers and those of the public," the statement read.

Johnson, meanwhile, said the department can't compromise on either officer safety or residents' rights.

"I'm not naive. I know that there will be some who will think that these policies are too restrictive for officers to do their jobs, and there will be some who think it isn't restrictive enough," he said.

"However, I do believe that the set of policies we are releasing today is in the best interest of everyone," he said.
Rob Duke's insight:
In the end, I don't see much change.  This falls back on the Paradox of Proximity; and the Paradox of the Condemned Prisoner.
In proximity, local governance and public safety are the only government representatives who are so close to the community that they must look into victim's eyes as the crime has been committed.  They also must deal with those who directly own property and the businesses of the "growth engine".  These are both powerful forces to influence behavior.  No doubt, these forces complained vociferously when they thought their police were being muzzled.
In the condemned prisoner paradox, even the condemned prisoner gets a say in his own execution (blindfold, cigarette, last meal), thus it's not unreasonable for an officer who might  be killed to have some say in their manner of (possible) death.  Otherwise, you'd start to find it hard to attract people to the business. In other words, while I may be willing to lay down my life, I want it to be for the best possible reasons; and, I want it to be because there was truly no other way.  The trade off is that I don't want rules that force me to lay down my life because of a pedantic reading of the rules.  The rules must be based off the natural law that if someone is attempting to harm others, they chose to have forced used against them.
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Investigation: Savannah airport police illegally used radar guns

Investigation: Savannah airport police illegally used radar guns | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In May 2016, Georgia Department of Public Safety began investigating allegations that the Airport Police Department was using radar equipment without a state-issued permit, according to the report.

Georgia State Code lists three agencies, aside from the Georgia State Patrol, that are allowed to use Speed Detection Devices on Georgia roads. Airport Police are not listed as an agency that can obtain one of these state-issue permits.
Rob Duke's insight:
A growing number of officers are being reported with thyroid cancer, and one possible link: use of radar.
If it were me, I'd not use radar.  If you do use it, make sure to have your thyroid checked every couple years and monitor it yourself by feeling your throat area around and above the Adam's Apple.  There shouldn't be any bumps in the area.

p.s. I survived Stage IV thyroid cancer.  It's no fun and your body will never be the same once you've had it.  You have no idea until you lose it about how important the thyroid is to feeling well and having energy.
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Jenna's comment, May 22, 5:30 PM
First of all, Congratulations to Professor Duke for his survival of Stage IV thyroid cancer! Thank you for the advice, it is not something to be taken lightly. I did not know that officers are developing thyroid cancer from the use of radar. This is extremely important to know. As for the article, it is interesting to see that the PD would use radar without a permit. Usually, from my experience, a PD tries to follow the rules in order to set a good example as well as build good relations with the public.
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Pierce Murphy, head of Seattle police’s civilian watchdog, stepping down

Pierce Murphy, head of Seattle police’s civilian watchdog, stepping down | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Pierce Murphy, who was appointed director of the Seattle Police Department’s Office of Professional Accountability in 2013, was seen as boosting public trust in the department’s internal investigations and discipline during his tenure.
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SPD officer on leave after family member brings abduction victim to his house

SPD officer on leave after family member brings abduction victim to his house | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Then, at around 1:00 a.m. authorities said the officer’s male family member and the victim showed up at the officer’s house. 
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State police to use video surveillance on expressways to combat shootings

State police to use video surveillance on expressways to combat shootings | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
State police to use video surveillance on expressways to combat shootings
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Montana Deputy Killed During Traffic Stop

Montana Deputy Killed During Traffic Stop | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Broadwater County (MT) sheriff’s deputy was shot and killed during a traffic stop early Tuesday morning near Three Forks, on MT 287, south of Interstate 90.
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Former LA County Sheriff Lee Baca sentenced to 3 years in jail abuse scandal

Former LA County Sheriff Lee Baca sentenced to 3 years in jail abuse scandal | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In what some called the end of a chapter in local civil rights abuse and jailhouse corruption, former Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca, who once led the largest department of its kind in the nation, was sentenced to three years in federal prison Fr
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Police chief killed was father of 6 with baby on the way

Police chief killed was father of 6 with baby on the way | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A police chief who had been on the job for just a few weeks and two nursing home employees are dead after a shooting this morning in Kirkersville, Ohio, officials said.

The gunman is also believed to be dead, Licking County Sheriff Randy Thorp said at a news conference.

Kirkersville police Chief Steven Eric Disario, 36, died after responding to a call regarding a man with a gun, Thorp said. Deputies came for back up and found him outside the Pine Kirk Care Center nursing home, Thorp said.

Authorities learned that a shooter was in the nursing home and went in, where they found three people dead, two employees and an individual believed to be the gunman, Thorp said.

The 23 residents of the nursing home were removed, Thorp said.
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Smoke shop bust will help sheriff's office buy new helicopter

Smoke shop bust will help sheriff's office buy new helicopter | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Federal government discovered Stuffed Pipe Smoke Shops in Fresno, Visalia, and Bakersfield were involved in the sales and distribution of synthetic cannabinoids, but these drugs, in a variety of packaging, were deadly.

"There have been deaths reported, serious bodily injury, and there are extreme psychological effects from taking the drug," said Karen Escobar, Asst. US Attorney.

The substance known as XLR 1 has also been linked to a large number of suicides. The owner of the Stuffed Pipe stores, Victor Nottoli, pleaded guilty to federal charges, connected to 24 tons of the stuff. He forfeited six and a half million dollars in proceeds.

"We are taking the money out, the profit out of crime, and we are putting it back into the community through law enforcement," said Phil Talbert Us Attorney Eastern Dist. CA.

A big check for nearly $2-million was presented to Sheriff Margaret Mims, by the IRS. Mims said the money will be put to good use.

"With this amount of money being deposited we are well on our way to making sure we have the funding to replace our second helicopter in our air enforcement unit."

In addition, to the money the Sheriff's office got a pickup truck seized from Nottoli. He is scheduled to be sentenced next year, and could face life in prison.
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Cops and doctors have the same problem: People don't trust them

Cops and doctors have the same problem: People don't trust them | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Hardly a week goes by without hearing about another case of police brutality. Many times, seemingly unnecessarily lethal force has been used, and these incidents have sparked protests across America. Each case is unique with differentiating circumstances, but the result is all too often — death. Many people have grouped these incidents together concluding that white officers have unnecessarily killed black men. This has initiated and reinforced mistrust of the entire police force in many communities. Realistically, the majority of the police force is here to protect and to serve. Nonetheless, in many communities, this trust has eroded and left many with the perception that the police force is simply out to violate the rights of racial, ethnic and religious minorities. For others, images of police dogs and fire hoses of the 60s have been reinforced showing that nothing has changed. Perceptions move quickly from interpersonal mistrust to institutional mistrust.

For health care providers, both types of mistrust can serve as a reminder that we too are subject to the scrutiny of the public. Each of our patients approaches us from a different perspective via various walks of life. Although the vast majority of our profession has very altruistic values while preventing disease and treating illness, episodes of our collective past may negate those values. Malicious medical experimentation including The Tuskegee Experiment or prisoners in Nazi Germany coupled with physicians who publish fictitious research about vaccines and autism could easily provoke mistrust institutionally.
Rob Duke's insight:
In one of Bittner's articles in your later readings, he calls both medicine and policing a "tainted" profession...he means damned if you do and damned if you don't....
Medicine and policing are both responsible for complexity that you don't have the luxury of turning off while you work on it (like replacing an auto part).  Instead, we are called upon to make repairs while the machine is running....which is nigh impossible....
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Jenna's comment, May 22, 5:07 PM
Articles like these are always astonishing to read. Law enforcement and medical professionals are supposed to be institutions in which the people can trust and depend on for support. When the people have no trust in these providers, where do they turn to for help and assistance? When there is no trust, this is when there will ultimately cause problems for both parties. The people will with hold information which cause the police and medical personnel to not be able to effectively do their jobs to its full potential.
Bethany M's comment, Today, 10:49 AM
I thought this article was particularly interesting. In the past year, I’ve taken it upon myself to conduct independent research regarding nutrition and the amount of training medical doctors receive. There are important parallels to be made between these two professions. Most people place an unmeasurable amount of trust in doctors when it comes to nutrition. However, I was surprised to learn that only a quarter of medical schools only offer a single course in nutrition. As if that isn’t bad enough, mainstream medical organizations actually lobby against an increase in nutrition education for doctors. There are also many instances where doctors know that the best “cure” is a lifestyle change, but don’t bother mentioning it to their patients because they don’t believe they would be willing to make such drastic lifestyle changes. (An example of this would be a doctor prescribing their patients medication for high blood pressure, instead of mentioning that they could first try cutting out caffeine and salt and try getting more exercise.) So instead, they prescribe medication. If you ask me, omitting the truth or “cure” to patients should be considered criminal. At the very least, you think they should be required to tell their patients the truth and to allow them the chance to decide whether they would rather try lifestyle changes or medication. However, that is not to say that doctors (or police officers) are genuinely bad people. I agree with the consensus of this article, that many individuals go into these professions with an altruistic type of attitude. Any google search will show that there is no media shortage of articles and videos depicting officers to be corrupt and ruthless abusing deadly force. However, (like doctors), police officers are mostly reacting to standards and guidelines set by Institutions and organizations. Often, the media blames the individuals who are merely reacting to standards that they have no control over. While it may seem bad that doctors often omit simple lifestyle changes in their recommendations to their patients, it’s also important to recognize that it’s not part of the medical training they receive. The only person who truly benefits from lifestyle changes is the patient. So, the system is structured in such a way that doctors are rewarded financially from big pharma to prescribe pills to their patients. Much like doctors, the system put in place for police officers often bares no responsibility by the media and they often demonize the individual who is merely reacting to the system.

References:
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/99/5/1153S.full
https://vimeo.com/23744792
http://drhyman.com/downloads/Lifestyle-Medicine.pdf
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23177484
How Not to Die, by Dr. Michael Greger
nutritionfacts.org

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Racial Bias Lawsuit Against Bennington Police Clears Hurdle

Racial Bias Lawsuit Against Bennington Police Clears Hurdle | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

 A federal judge has rejected a Bennington police request to dismiss a racial bias lawsuit filed by a black man whose drug conviction was overturned by the Vt. Supreme Court.

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VIDEO: Officer Shoots, Kills Man in Midst of Decapitation - Calibre Press

VIDEO: Officer Shoots, Kills Man in Midst of Decapitation - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
From Lufkin Daily News:  A Lufkin Police officer has been no-billed in the March shooting death of an aggravated assault suspect. The incident involving six-year officer Blake Witherspoon was presented to an Angelina County grand jury Tuesday, resulting in a no-bill, according to a Lufkin Police Department press release. A “no-bill” means the grand jury …
Rob Duke's insight:
I post this article just to illustrate the range of truly crazy things officers are likely to deal with in their career.  The video is graphic so just be forewarned if you decide to view it.
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Jenna's comment, May 22, 5:23 PM
This video was graphic but it gave me a better insight as to what an officer may encounter during his or her career. It is important to see videos like this not only to build respect for law enforcement personnel, but to be able to take everything into account when deciding if law enforcement is the right career path for you.
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Study: Dallas Police Don't Target Minorities, Social Media Distorts Perception

Study: Dallas Police Don't Target Minorities, Social Media Distorts Perception | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A new study debunks the belief that white Dallas police officers use force against blacks and Hispanics disproportionately.

The study was done by researchers at U-T Dallas, the U-T School of Public Health and the University of South Florida, and was based on more than 5,600 reports filed by Dallas police during a two year period.

University of Texas at Dallas’ Alex Piquero says when researchers took into consideration the factors in each incident, the majority of the race, ethnic differences from officer and citizen disappears.

“On average the popular perception that Dallas police are targeting minorities, doesn’t hold up in the data that we have for that two year period,” Piquero says.
Rob Duke's insight:
That syncs up with my experience, as well....
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Police Taking New Precautions On Opioid Calls

Police Taking New Precautions On Opioid Calls | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
It used to be that when police officers responded to an opioid overdose, they worried about saving just the victim's live. Now they also have to protect their own.
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Jenna's comment, May 22, 5:38 PM
I never knew that just coming into skin contact with Fentanyl can cause someone to overdose. This is scary to think that an officer who comes into contact with this will see the consequences as well as not be able to defend him or herself while being unconscious. I think it is a good idea to wear masks as well and to teach the officers proper handling techniques on drug calls.
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Consultant criticizes Grand Rapids police's traffic stop study

Consultant criticizes Grand Rapids police's traffic stop study | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A public safety and consulting firm has expressed concerns regarding the methodology of the recent traffic study that found Grand Rapids police stop black drivers at a disproportionate rate.

Richard Johnson, chief academic adviser for Dolan Consulting Group, shared his critique of the Lamberth Consulting study earlier this week while teaching a one-day class at Calvin College.

Johnson said the makeup of the surveyor group, procedure in which surveyors measured traffic demographics to be used as benchmark data and the study's lack of external review process opened up the possibility of skewed results.

"While reviewing the Lamberth Consulting report, I found many methodological issues that I found disturbing, and that were inconsistent with the normal practices of social science or the practices of other recognized racial profiling researchers," Johnson wrote in his critique.

"Their results might still be correct, but some of the things that were done, the methodology can call the findings into question," Johnson told MLive/The Grand Rapids Press.

Grand Rapids Police Chief David Rahinsky said he read the critique and it raised some legitimate questions, which will be part of ongoing dialogue on the subject. 

At the same time, he doesn't see Johnson's report as adversarial to Lamberth's report.

"Regardless of the initial report or the criticism, at the end of the day, steps being implemented to improve training and review policy, and the conversations we're having with the community, it's only making us a better department and a better city," Rahinsky said.
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Thinking about moonlighting in marijuana? You can't if you're a cop

After hearing that some law enforcement officials were thinking of getting into the marijuana business, the executive director of the Alaska Police Standards Council asked for guidance.
Rob Duke's insight:
What do you think?  If a cop can legally own a bar, should she also be allowed to be a partner in a cannabis business?  I worked with a cop who owned a pawnshop--there were obvious potential conflicts, but he managed to insulate himself from those--wouldn't a cannabis business be similar to a pawnshop, bar, liquor store....?
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Sevy Sheppard's comment, May 20, 3:24 PM
I'm really conflicted with this. On one hand, it totally makes sense. Marijuana is illegal federally, it doesn't always show the best moral character, and it seems unprofessional in a way. On the other hand, if a cop can own a bar or pawn shop, then it is not that much different. Personally, I wouldn't feel super comfortable if I knew an officer was also interested in that lifestyle (at least enough to want to be in the business), but shouldn't everyone be subject to the same rights and opportunities? I understand that law enforcement officials have different standards, but the stigma around marijuana has changed. I guess I don't have a one sided opinion on this!
Rob Duke's comment, May 21, 12:23 PM
A fairly common cop side-business is towing, which is another potential conflict of interest. I've also seen cops invest in glass businesses, locksmiths, tires....all of which are potential conflicts.
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Stockton, Calif., Police Use Social Media to Try to Catch

Stockton, Calif.,  Police Use Social Media to Try to Catch | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Stockton police released photos on social media of a man suspected of stealing more than five parking meters Monday and asked the public for information that may lead to an arrest.
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Sevy Sheppard's comment, May 20, 3:31 PM
This article reminds me of the beginning of "Cool Hand Luke"! Yet more importantly, I like the idea of using social media to gather information or leads on a suspect. I see people using social media all the time to find pets that ran away, cars that are stolen, etc. Truth be told - a lot of the times the power of social media is actually strong enough for people to locate these missing items! In that case, I really believe that it would be helpful as well for crimes like this. Though social media may have its negative impacts, it can very well have its positives as well.
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The Latest: Las Vegas Police Used Neck Hold 51 Times in 2016

The Latest: Las Vegas Police Used Neck Hold 51 Times in 2016 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An unarmed man died after Las Vegas police grabbed him in a neck hold highlighting the controversial law enforcement technique to subdue people.

The New York Police Department — the nation's largest — no longer allows officers to go for the neck after the July 2014 death of 43-year-old Eric Garner.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Nevada says the technique should be off-limits after Tashii Brown's death outside a Strip casino early Sunday.

Las Vegas police train to use a version of a chokehold designed to avoid restricting the airway while cutting the flow of blood to the brain.
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You Get the Police You Ask For - Calibre Press

You Get the Police You Ask For - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In Chicago, the police have been sidelined, demeaned, and maligned. They are very much aware that everything they do is a risk to their careers. Check the stats: They’ve shut-down, refusing to abide by the restrictive rules set down by the legislature. Not because they’re lazy, but because they and their families rely upon their jobs.

In two years the murder rate is up 60%.

I saw an African-American mother from the south side on TV a few months ago. She was enraged at a community meeting, decrying the police and in anguish over the violence in her community. When someone mentioned that the citizens wanted the police to discontinue Stop-and-Frisk she balked. “We want them to do Stop-and-Frisk! We just want them to stop the right people.”

And therein lies the problem.

As the ACLU pointed out, over 90% of the people frisked resulted in no contraband being discovered, proving, to them, the tactic is a failure and an undue hardship on those briefly stopped and patted down.

But the cops working high-crime areas, knowing they were pushing the limits of Terry v. Ohio when they detained and frisked young men of color in high-crime areas, knew something the academics didn’t. Something only the street and common sense teaches …

When you are interacting, stopping, talking, and patting, the other guys carrying the guns and drugs see it. They know they could be next. So they don’t carry when the cops are active. If they don’t carry, then they aren’t as quick to pull and use. Less people shot, less people dead.

Conclusion

Today is a different story. We have a very emboldened criminal element in many cities.

So politicians, pundits, etc., you got what you asked for. The question is: Did the citizens ask for it?
Rob Duke's insight:
It's our own abuse of power that got us here....we need planned change built into our system or we risk having change thrust upon us....
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Videos: Calif. cop fatally shoots knife-wielding attacker

Videos: Calif. cop fatally shoots knife-wielding attacker | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Officer Kenneth Cha fatally shot Nicholas Flusche, who was still pursuing his wounded victim and had the victim’s blood all over his face
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