Police Problems and Policy
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Smile, You're On Camera! DC Police Told To Keep Bodycams On During Inauguration Day Protests

Smile, You're On Camera! DC Police Told To Keep Bodycams On During Inauguration Day Protests | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Washington, DC - Despite the ACLU claiming that it's illegal, officers will be recording Inauguration Day protesters.
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EXCLUSIVE: Cop caught on camera trashing Mayor de Blasio punished

EXCLUSIVE: Cop caught on camera trashing Mayor de Blasio punished | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Bronx cop caught on video complaining about the Mayor has been docked eight vacation days, the Daily News has learned.

Officer Joseph Spina was penalized because he “expressed a personal opinion about public policy,” a police source said.

Cops do that all the time, a second source noted, but added that Spina complained while taking enforcement action — and a motorist was recording as Spina gave him a summons for driving without a license.
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DASHCAM: Deputy Under Fire During Wellness Check - Calibre Press

From the Ledger-Enquirer:  Matthew Edmondson is accused of shooting Deputy Michael Hockett, who was shot just before noon after he went to the residence to check on a person. He was transported to West Georgia Medical Center where he was treated for non-life threatening injuries. Edmondson was charged with one count each of criminal attempt …
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Hero cops tackled armed man in 'suicide vest' near Arsenal's stadium

Hero cops tackled armed man in 'suicide vest' near Arsenal's stadium | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The officers challenged the man after witnesses described him as shouting aggressively and waving what appeared to be a machete in the street.

After he resisted they tackled him to the ground before spotting coloured electrical wires protruding from the suspect’s jacket - suggesting he was wearing a suicide vest.

Scotland Yard said that fearing for the public’s safety, Pcs Jason Hodgson and Alex Field “made the selfless decision to tightly hug the suspect to prevent his movement from triggering” what they feared to be a bomb.
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Why Body Cameras Will Be Off as Officers Monitor Protesters

Why Body Cameras Will Be Off as Officers Monitor Protesters | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Civil rights groups are taking steps to ensure police respect the constitutional rights of demonstrators at the presidential inauguration. News 4's Mark Segraves reports on why D.C.
Rob Duke's insight:
Crazy policy.  There's no expectation of privacy in a public place nor in the presence of a police officer...seems like a non-issue to me.
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Former No. 2 in L.A. Sheriff's office surrenders to prison to serve 5-year sentence

Former No. 2 in L.A. Sheriff's office surrenders to prison to serve 5-year sentence | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Former Los Angeles County Undersheriff Paul Tanaka surrendered Monday to federal authorities in Colorado to begin serving a five-year prison sentence for conspiracy and obstructing an FBI investigation into deputy jail abuses. Tanaka, who as the second-in-command ran day-to-day operations o
Rob Duke's insight:
You can't fight the Feds and you can never lie or dissemble to them.
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NYPD K-9 Hunter, police dog who helped in Haiti, dead at 11

NYPD K-9 Hunter, police dog who helped in Haiti, dead at 11 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In his eight years with the NYPD, canine officer Hunter sniffed out illegal guns, while bringing joy to children of all ages.
Rob Duke's insight:
They, too, serve.....
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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, January 16, 4:04 AM

God bless and keep those this K-9 has come in contact witb in its life as you Lord God love and provide for animals to.

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Video: Florida woman having ‘bad day' drives SUV into T-Mobile store

Video: Florida woman having ‘bad day' drives SUV into T-Mobile store | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Wellington, Florida, woman who told police she was having a “bad day” allegedly went on a rampage Thursday at a T-Mobile store in Palm Springs, according to an arrest report.
Rob Duke's insight:
One of the 99% calls we handle every day without using force--even though the person was batpoo cray cray at the time.

In another 10% (not very scientific methodology on my part), officer jack up the situation when they could do more to calm it down.

The other 89% are folks acting crazy or emotional that fly out of control so quickly and erratically that officer respond as trained to keep themselves and others safe...with often tragic results.  This results in a fatality about 900 times a year across the U.S.  These are all tragic--even those with felonious intent.

But lets keep this in perspective.  Gun deaths are 30 times greater and automobile deaths are also 30 times greater, but the real shocking number is the number of medical malpractice deaths in the U.S. every year.  Take a guess: ____________

How many did you say?

It was 120,000 medical practice deaths in 2016 as reported by the doctors themselves (John Hopkins said the number in 2013 was 250,000 deaths if you include pharmacist malpractice).

There are 70,000 licensed doctors in the U.S.

765,000 sworn officers in the U.S. who kill about 1000 each year.

So, you're 120 times more likely to be killed by your doctor (or 250 times if you include pharmacists).

Your 30 times more likely to be killed by someone with a gun or car.
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BREAKING: Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Officer Attacked, Struck, Dragged, In Hit And Run

BREAKING: Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Officer Attacked, Struck, Dragged, In Hit And Run | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Las Vegas, NV - A Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Officer was struck and dragged for several feet by a suspect drive
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Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office, Santa Rosa police pull out of California gang database

Sonoma County’s two largest law enforcement agencies have stopped using a controversial statewide gang database criticized in a state audit that concluded it was riddled with old, unverified and inaccurate information, causing some people to be improperly identified as gang members.

The Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office purged its records from the CalGang Criminal Intelligence System and ended its role as administrator of the database for about 30 other California counties as of Jan. 1, said Sheriff’s Sgt. Spencer Crum, a spokesman for the agency.

In December, the Santa Rosa Police Department removed its records from the database and stopped using it as a tool to track gang members, said police Sgt. Tommy Isachsen, who runs the city’s gang investigations team.

Both agencies said new laws that require law enforcement to notify people when they’re entered into the database and allow them to appeal the listing make the system too cumbersome to use.

“We still continue to believe it’s a viable tool, and it’s unfortunate we’re unable to use it,” Crum said.

The move was applauded by lawyers and advocates who said the state audit — which focused on the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office, because of its administrator role, and three other agencies — uncovered problems with CalGang long known by those trying to defend people named in the system.
Rob Duke's insight:
In order to use these databases to investigate and prosecute gang enhanced crimes, there needed to be better due process.
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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, January 15, 7:05 AM

It's sad but an eye opening thing to know that the government is using inaccurate information that can cost a person or persons their lives just because what inaccurate data says about someone   that may be the right person just with the wrong information making them out to be in the eyes of others a person that they are not. That would be a tactic of. vengeance by which the person seeking vengeance get others to do their dirty work and it appears just because what the false inaccurate data says. Thanks to the Police Departments that has decided to stop using the inaccurate data base as it could have cost lives that can not be returned or.maybe already have just because the data base had inaccurate information such as a person being serious dangerous when they were not and the police shot them down like a dog just because data said dangerous but the person can not be given his or her life again when info is found to be inaccurate intentionally done or not. 

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We Now Have Algorithms To Predict Police Misconduct

We Now Have Algorithms To Predict Police Misconduct | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
On a sweltering Monday in late June 2015, the city council in Charlotte, North Carolina, met to discuss, among other items in a seven-hour marathon, how to carry out a controversial new approach to predicting police misconduct. Opinions were divided, and the discussion was tense. One council member was afraid of “upsetting the troops.” A second called the use of data about individual police officers an invasion of privacy. In response, another said, “I’m always a fan of third parties looking over our shoulder.”

Finally, Kerr Putney, soon to be sworn in as Charlotte’s new police chief, got up to reassure the council. He spoke about the need to “balance public need versus what officers may want.” He seemed to persuade several members.

“So it won’t be used for retribution?” one asked. “Absolutely not,” Putney replied.

Minutes later, the council voted to work with a group of data scientists to develop a sophisticated system for predicting when cops will go bad. These researchers, part of the White House’s Police Data Initiative, say their algorithm can foresee adverse interactions between officers and civilians, ranging from impolite traffic stops to fatal shootings. Their system can suggest preventive measures — an appealing prospect for police departments facing greater scrutiny and calls for accountability. Two other large departments — the Los Angeles County sheriff and the Knoxville police — have signed on to use the research to develop new systems, and several other agencies have expressed interest. The scientists hope their method can serve as a template for stopping police misbehavior before it happens.

Many police departments have early warning systems — software that tracks each officer’s performance and aims to forecast potential problems. The systems identify officers with troubling patterns of behavior, allowing superiors to monitor these cops more closely or intervene and send them to counseling.

The researchers, a mixed group of graduate and undergraduate students working together at the University of Chicago with backgrounds in statistics, programming, economics and related disciplines, are trying to build a better kind of early warning system. They began their task last summer with a request from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department: Predict when police officers would participate in adverse interactions with civilians.

To build their early warning system, the University of Chicago group first looked for signals in the data that an officer might be going astray. They used a comprehensive data set of interactions between cops and the public gathered by Charlotte police officials over more than a decade. The researchers found that the most potent predictor of adverse interactions in a given year was an officer’s own history.1 Cops with many instances of adverse interactions in one year were the most likely to have them in the next year. Using this and other indicators, the University of Chicago group’s algorithm was better able than Charlotte’s existing system to predict trouble.

The algorithm holds great promise for its cleverness and its accuracy. But the idea of using statistical models to predict police misconduct is not new, and past efforts have often met with resistance. In fact, the Chicago Police Department — now under intense federal scrutiny in the wake of the Laquan McDonald shooting — constructed such an algorithm more than 20 years ago, only to abandon it under pressure from the officers’ union, the Fraternal Order of Police.
Rob Duke's insight:
What are the ethics of punishing before a violation has been committed.  Isn't this Minority Report territory?

In my experience, there are several types of "problem officers":
1. Those who come to the department with problems that either: a. slip through the screening process (narcissism for instance often looks like outgoing and confident character traits, but can end up causing some nasty problems for a department); or b. who are allowed through for reasons, such as nepotism and lowered standards (there are more than a few reasons for this and I'm not throwing stones.  We live in a political world and must deal with these factors.  I've been pressured to make a hiring decision and been mistaken both ways in the past, so we practice an imperfect human resource/personnel system.)
2. Those who are caught up in a Greek tragedy of circumstances that many of us have found ourselves; and, which could happen on any given day.  Sure, they take some hubris or arrogance on the officer's part, too, but we've all made the wrong call; treated someone callously or without dignity.  Cops aren't perfect, but many of these "bad" calls took two bad actors to coordinate.
3. Officers who were trained and socialized poorly.  Officers who "buy in" to a deviant sub-culture.
4. Officers that respond to institutional incentives.  In what I've called the Paradox of Proximity [stealing from Wm. Ker Muir's Paradoxes of Power, see Democracy in America (2012) and Streetcorner Politicians (1977)].  No Chief remains in office for long if he or she cannot manage officers to control crime.  This is one part of the proximity problem: we're too close to the political machine on one side; the business community or growth machine on another side; and, the victim/community that demands (begs for justice) on still another side.  Cops respond to these incentives that attract and push and pull them toward "Noble-Cause Corruption"; or simply policing aggressively, which is no longer in fashion.
5. Those who "redline" for one reason or another.  They have undiagnosed PTSD; or they're burned out (too much political pressure is as bad in my experience as traumatic experiences on the "street").  I've been there 2 or 3 times in my career for both reasons.  That stress and built up pressure can contribute to poor judgement and over-reaction.

My point in listing these is to suggest that these are not solely officer problems, but are also organizational problems.
This leads me to ask several questions:
--Should we have better personnel systems?  Are best practices studies and adopted on a widespread basis or are we largely operating as we have traditionally in our organizations?  
--Should we spend more resources on training--is it valued enough in our organizations?  Should officers be trained by a special cadre of trainers?  We currently train with officers who have fewer than 10 years experience (and many have under five years)--is this part of the problem?  How could we not expect the sub-culture to perpetuate itself?
--Do departments do enough to provide officers with safe ways to ask for and receive help when the pressure mounds?  Do departments care for officers and their careers?  What happens when officers are frustrated that they are not progressing in their careers...or when their job enrichment stalls?
--Finally, is our police ethical system up to the job of managing a more complex society?
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Capitol Architect Says Not In His House, Anti-Police Painting To Be Permanently Removed

Capitol Architect Says Not In His House, Anti-Police Painting To Be Permanently Removed | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The controversial, anti-police painting hanging in a Capitol hallway is permanently coming down on Tuesday, January 17, 2017.

According to The Washington Post,  Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Wash., said in a statement earlier today, January 13, 2017, that he had been advised by House Speaker Paul Ryan’s office that Capitol officials had determined that the painting was in violation of House Rules and would be permanently removed on Tuesday.

Rep. Reichert is a former Sheriff.  He talked to Speaker Ryan earlier this week and asked him to have the painting removed because it was against competition rules, “depicting subjects of contemporary political controversy or a sensationalistic or gruesome nature,” on Capitol grounds.  The painting depicts police officers as pigs and is supposed to reflect the 2014 civil unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, after Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer.

The painting hung unnoticed for seven months until its subject was recognized.  It then became the focus of social media and a continuing outrage from police groups, law enforcement officers and others because of its blatant and egregious disrespect of police.  After it was taken down the first time by a Republican Congressman and returned to Rep. Clay’s Office, Rep. Clay had it re-hung in a staged media event with Black Congressional Caucus members present.
Rob Duke's insight:
This was "much ado about nothing" in my humble opinion.  Ever since George Orwell's Animal Farm, this has been a popular anachronism for cops.  To have it revived during this period of social and racial unrest isn't unexpected.

I have dozens of miniature pigs and police officers depicted as pigs in my own personal collection; and frankly, think it's humorous that civil order officers are equated with Orwell's symbols (meant to be coded representations of some of the vilest dictators in history).

When we begin to attempt to stifle art, or when we think that we should engage in politics, we begin to resemble Orwell's pigs.  I think we should chuckle and say to ourselves: "nothing to see here....move along now...."
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Special Report: Across the U.S., police contracts shield officers from scrutiny

Special Report: Across the U.S., police contracts shield officers from scrutiny | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Reuters, examining the fine print of 82 police union contracts in large cities across the country, found a pattern of protections afforded the men and women in blue:

• A majority of the contracts call for departments to erase disciplinary records, some after just six months, making it difficult to fire officers with a history of abuses. In 18 cities, suspensions are erased in three years or less. In Anchorage, Alaska, suspensions, demotions and disciplinary transfers are removed after two years.

• Nearly half of the contracts allow officers accused of misconduct to access the entire investigative file – including witness statements, GPS readouts, photos, videos and notes from the internal investigation – before being interrogated.

• Twenty cities, including San Antonio, allow officers accused of misconduct to forfeit sick leave or holiday and vacation time rather than serve suspensions.

• Eighteen cities require an officer’s written consent before the department publicly releases documents involving prior discipline or internal investigations.

• Contracts in 17 cities set time limits for citizens to file complaints about police officers – some as short as 30 days. Nine cities restrict anonymous complaints from being investigated.
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Indiana bill would allow police to shut down protests 'by any means necessary'

Indiana bill would allow police to shut down protests 'by any means necessary' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Opponents in Indianapolis argue the proposed law, simply labelled Senate Bill 285, or SB 285, would give police power ‘even to the point of costing lives’
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NYPD to consider community interaction, rescues in promotions

NYPD to consider community interaction, rescues in promotions | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The NYPD is deploying a promotion system that will emphasize 'qualitative' police activity alongside enforcement numbers, officials said.
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Little Elm Police Officer Killed on Duty, Suspect Dead

Little Elm Police Officer Killed on Duty, Suspect Dead | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Little Elm police officer died after being shot while responding to a report of an armed man outside a house Tuesday afternoon, and the suspect was later confirmed dead after an hours-long standoff with police.
Little Elm Chief of Police Rodney Harrison said during a news conference Tuesday night that 48-year-old Detective Jerry Walker succumbed to his injuries hours after the shooting.
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'Bad apples' taint Camden County police, civil rights group says

'Bad apples' taint Camden County police, civil rights group says | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"A few bad apples on the metro force taint the hard work and dedication of their peers, all while under the blind eye of police commanders and a chief of police that enrich themselves with higher salaries and unprecedented promotions," Rich Rivera, co-chair of the alliance's Civil Rights Committee, said in the release.
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NYPD hearing begins for cop who killed Ramarley Graham in 2012

NYPD hearing begins for cop who killed Ramarley Graham in 2012 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The long-awaited departmental trial of Police Officer Richard Haste for the fatal 2012 shooting of Ramarley Graham begins Tuesday.
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The 3 Company Crises Boards Should Watch For

Here are some practices that facilitate problem-finding corporate governance:

Have an explicit negotiated agreement about the relationship between the board and management. The arrangement must allow the board and staff to do problem-finding work while not cutting across the turf of line management. For instance, at Infosys board work inside the organization and work by staff groups was governed by a rule: “noses in, fingers out.” While the board and staff may have found problems, line management was responsible for designing and implementing the solution.


Design the processes by which the board does its regular work — strategy development and approval, capital approvals, performance reviews, etc. — to embed problem-finding. This requires more than asking “tough” questions at the board meeting that managers can anticipate.


Adopt a problem-finding mindset. Think about parts of the organization that may be generating problems. Make explicit your theory about how that part of the organization works. Test the theory. Welcome news of risk; encourage early warning.


Understand that most problem-finding will happen outside the board room, and involve employees several levels below the executive team. Board members cannot expect to infer all the problems while sitting in the boardroom and cannot expect staff members to find them all. Problem-finding boards need some members (but not necessarily all) who spend time working closely with employees to find out how things really work.


Embed as much of the convergent problem-finding activity as possible into the performance measurement system for line managers and delegate the rest to staff groups. Problems will only be found reliably if the board mindfully ensures that these systems are designed to find problems and makes sure they are delivering.


Beware of biases and blind spots that result from becoming too steeped in the culture of the organization. Question the norms and assumptions that drive people’s behavior. Boards that enunciate the likely hidden assumptions underpinning the business’s culture are less likely to fall into a collusive blindness that inhibits their problem-finding.


Acknowledge the limitations in problem-finding and look for ways to mitigate them. Develop internal learning and reflection systems. These could be framed in terms of developing and enhancing capabilities in risk investigation, exploration, and analysis.


As strategic risk increases, so do the chances of failure because of ungoverned incompetence. Most of these failures are minor — generally, projects that are quietly written off. Occasionally a major disaster strikes, causing a corporate catastrophe. Corporate governance systems that assume failure is driven by malfeasance will often miss these failures, at least until they become unambiguous. To catch them early, boards need to put in place governance systems that are intrinsically problem-finding.

Rob Duke's insight:
HBR's organizational advice often applies to policing organizations with only slight "tweaking".  What part of this article is not good advice?

1. Noses in: Fingers out.  This is a shorthand way of describing the Politics-Administration Dichotomy.  The Board, or oversight authority, sets policy and we administer it.  We never get annoyed when they ask questions and decide to make changes and they never try to actually "do" the work.  They help identify the problems and we find the solution(s), but like James Madison's checks and balances, it works best when these powers are shared.

2. As Frank Boldt and I discovered (building on John Kingdon's work), not only do you need Problems, People, and Policy (solutions), but it's also important to examine the institutions (rules of the game) and also manage a co-alignment process where you not only reach up to invite input, but you also reach laterally and "down".  This insures balance with the entire network of interest holders and internalizes a problem-finding culture.

3. Also adopting something like the Balanced Scorecard budget and assessment system helps the organization maintain a problem-finding mindset.  When I know my evaluation depends on my place in the co-alignment system, then I'm working on it every day.  This creates a system that sustains nurturing and, more importantly, identifying when nurturing isn't happening.

4. We need to find an ethical system that demands that we examine how our actions impact the downstream customer...our grandchildren.  If we're not leaving it better for them, then we're probably doing something wrong.  A good start for this is to empower, embolden, and assign the devil's advocate role (both inside and outside the department).  We should celebrate the contrarians in our midst instead of delegating them to the dead end jobs.  These are the folks who will help us ensure that we are not captured by our times or by our culture.

5. Always know that what we're doing isn't good enough and that we need to be vigilant for ways to improve.  This means we need systems that encourage officers and staff to call down "airstrikes" on themselves when they realize that something isn't working; and they need to do this knowing that they won't be castigated, but will be celebrated for acknowledging an opportunity for internal learning and reflection.
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Bernie Sanders Advocates That FBI Director Comey Step Down

Bernie Sanders Advocates That FBI Director Comey Step Down | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Bernie Sanders Advocates That FBI Director Comey Step Down
Rob Duke's insight:
They ignore that we have competing values at stake here, which left Comey with only one viable option:

1. We have the value of a separate and disinterested public bureaucracy.  Woodrow Wilson called this the Politics-Administration Dichotomy.  In exchange for a civil service system that put people into jobs based upon merit and then gave them a property right to keep the job based upon "good" performance, the public bureaucrat would stay out of "politics".  In other words, they wouldn't campaign and engage in all the dirty business of tit for tat revenge, extortion, and reciprocal back scratching of political cronies.
2. We also have the value of an independent police apparatus that will treat everyone equally and fairly.  This value grew out of the police professionalization movement that, in turn, came out of the same Progressive Movement that installed the Politics-Administration Dichotomy.  This movement has been informed further by the New Public Administration theory and practice that asserts that all public servants have an ethical obligation to trumpet the news whenever "the emperor has no clothes".  While the Politics-Administration Dichotomy camp suggests that the bureaucracy should focus on the areas of economy, effectiveness, and efficiency, the New Public Admin advocates argue that the idea of equity is above the simple management tasks (see Dwight Waldo, H. George Fredrickson, Chester Newland, for more on New Public Admin.)

Now, under this umbrella, FBI Director Comey was forced to endure the backlash from a political investigation that appeared to have been compromised when Attorney General Lynch met with former President Bill Clinton on a secluded tarmac in a private jet to discuss "grandchildren".  This was an explanation that few believed and placed the FBI in a position of seeming to be political lackeys.  

After this, the rank and file FBI agents were angry.  Many agents left successful and comfortable assignments with local and state police agencies.  I can only imagine their perception that the FBI had lost all credibility--they probably wished they had never transferred.  I also imagine that Comey knew this and knew that there was zero chance that a disgruntled agent would not leak the fact that they had discovered another server that had the potential to disclose emails that were deleted from the Clinton server.  Whether there were any additional emails or not is irrelevant because the scandal would be about cover up and not content--which is always an order of magnitude worse than the actual underlying scandal.

Thus, Comey was faced with competing values and a binary choice of action:

1. Follow a Politics-Administration Dichotomy path and say nothing; or
2. Follow a New Public Administration path and send a private letter to Congress alerting them to the likely source of new emails.

If you follow the first path and there's a leak, then Secretary Clinton's campaign would be damaged and you'd be accused of misfeasance; 

On the other hand, if you follow the second path, then you still risk a leak from Congress, but this type of leak should be less harmful than an accusation of further political skulduggery.  And, at least you won't be accused of participating in a cover up.  

While the second path might be used at the last minute to insinuate that there was still some criminal charge that might arise out of the FBI investigation, the FBI also acted quickly after that to review the emails and send the "all clear" signal.  This outcome would never have been so clean if it had also been accompanied by an accusation of cover up.

It seems clear to me that Comey really only had one choice given the new source for emails from the Clinton Server--he had to send the letter to Congressional leaders.  In my mind, this path wasn't inconsistent with the Politics-Administration Dichotomy path, it just also added an Equity element from the New Public Administration path that protected the public's perception of the FBI's ability to conduct fair, equal and unbiased investigations.
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Johns Hopkins study suggests medical errors are third-leading cause of death in U.S.

Johns Hopkins study suggests medical errors are third-leading cause of death in U.S. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Diagnostic errors, medical mistakes led to more than 250,000 deaths in 2013, researchers estimate
Rob Duke's insight:
Backup for article above.
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Samsung's Scion Had a Sleepless Night in 22 Straight Hours of Questioning

Samsung's Scion Had a Sleepless Night in 22 Straight Hours of Questioning | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Jay Y. Lee, who heads South Korea's massive Samsung Group, was given a $5 box meal for lunch and did not sleep in over 22 hours of questioning in a corruption scandal involving impeached President Park Geun-hye.
Rob Duke's insight:
We complain about the U.S. police, but look around the world and compare....22 hours of questioning...?
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Video of officers attacked in Crawley

Video of officers attacked in Crawley | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Jamshid Piruz, 34, unemployed and of no fixed address has been sentenced to life at Hove Crown Court for various offences including two counts of attempted grievous bodily harm with intent.

It stems from a call police received on 7 January 2016 to report a man had been seen acting suspiciously in Stagelands, Langley Green.

When officers found Piruz, in nearby Nightingale Close, he was carrying a hammer (pictured) and hiding in a confined bin area of flats in the close.

As the body worn video shows, Piruz confronted officers from where he was hiding, threatening them with the hammer and two Tasers were discharged but proved ineffective. Officers then deliberately withdrew in an effort to create more space so that Piruz could be safely arrested.
 


Unfortunately PC Jessie Chick's route was blocked and she was momentarily isolated. Despite being attacked, she successfully managed to defend herself with her baton before officers were able to return to help.
 
PC Stuart Young was then struck by the hammer on the neck and shoulder before the suspect could be detained and arrested. Although PC Young was taken to hospital following the incident, he fortunately did not suffer any serious injuries and was back at work the following day.
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San Jose residents, cops, talk racial bias and policing

San Jose residents, cops, talk racial bias and policing | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Organizers said they aim to protect the community and “stop the criminalization of African American, Latino, Muslim and immigrant community members.
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BREAKING: Fired Deputy Ben Fields Cleared Of Wrongdoing By DOJ, Gonna Sue The Hell Out Of Th...

BREAKING: Fired Deputy Ben Fields Cleared Of Wrongdoing By DOJ, Gonna Sue The Hell Out Of Th... | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Richland County, SC - Ben Fields, the former Richland County Deputy who was fired after video of a recording of him dealing with a disorderly student went viral, wa
Rob Duke's insight:
The opposition view on this firing over the questionable use of force....
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