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The Prison Problem - Harvard Magazine

The Prison Problem - Harvard Magazine | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Prison Problem
Harvard Magazine
A crime-control strategy of locking up more people, and keeping them locked up longer, isn't working, he says.
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Diana Dillard's comment, February 17, 2013 2:09 PM
The revolving door of prison isn't going to change without a serious overhaul of perception. For those that believe strongly in crime control and punishment the key to changing that mentality should focus on the increased levels of danger these releasees pose to our communities. Prevention, rehabilitation, and reintegration are the components needed for a safer society, not longer prison sentences.
Kamdon Thompson's comment, February 17, 2013 6:20 PM
While the recidivism problem is a tough one to solve, this article does well by pointing out that the best thing we can do is try to keep people from ever entering the prison system in the first place. Incarceration has become the remedy for social problems such as mental disorders, lack of education and substance abuse. With our current sentencing structure being so heavy on incarceration, unless we can keep young people with social needs from offending there will continue to be a steady stream leading into the corrections system.
Melanie Wright's comment, February 23, 2013 8:49 PM
I think the problem is changing everyone's perception as Diana stated. People don't want to hear about how to help criminals even though the statistics are proving that our extreme consequential penalties are not deterring or preventing crime. People don't want to hear this because they don't care, and the only way to get them to care is to shove all of the information and facts in their face. If they knew we could spend less and get better results, they might be willing. If they knew that statistics show that if people are able to be rehabilitated recidivism rates decrease, crime lowers, police force can be scaled back and prison populations decress (all in all saving money) they might care a bit more. I think everyone has come to this mentality to look out for ourselves that we have forgot how much we need and depend on each other and what great things we can do as a community. It takes forgiveness and willingness but the results of a better society far outweigh any sacrifices we would have to make. It takes a village to raise a child and it also takes a village to rehabilitate a criminal. We as a society have to learn to forgive and move forward instead of sulking on the past, we have to let things go if we want to see progress. This was a really good eye opening article.

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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Winslow Township police officer charged with shooting his own patrol car

Winslow Township police officer charged with shooting his own patrol car | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

 Da'Shaun Carr, 23, of Clayton, charged with false public alarm in alleged incident.

Rob Duke's insight:

Perhaps a Munchausin by Officer incident?

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Ricky Osborne's comment, Today, 12:56 AM
What was the point of shooting his own vehicle? This officer did not thoroughly plan out this false shooting report. He should have known the exact procedures that would take place after he shot his patrol car being that he himself is an officer. This guys should be embarrassed and removed from his position as a law enforcement officer for breaking the law in a deceitful manner. I guess everyone is innocent until proven guilty in the court of law.
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UC Irvine police officers accuse bosses of spying on them

UC Irvine police officers accuse bosses of spying on them | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Top brass at the UC Irvine Police Department secretly installed microphones and cameras to spy on employees at the organization's headquarters, according to a lawsuit filed by the union representing campus police officers.
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The FBI Is very excited about this machine that can scan your DNA in 90 minutes

The FBI Is very excited about this machine that can scan your DNA in 90 minutes | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Rapid-DNA technology makes it easier than ever to grab and store your genetic profile. G-men, cops, and Homeland Security can't wait to see it everywhere.
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Jennifer Slingerland's comment, November 20, 10:41 PM
The FBI isn’t the only one excited about this development. How incredible it is that we’re coming so far with this technology; my great-great grandparents moved across the nation from east to west in covered wagons. Now we’re mapping the genetic makeup of human beings in the time it takes to watch a bad Jack Black movie. But think of the possibilities such a machine will unfold for our prison system. No longer will suspects need to wait for days and days to be cleared of suspicion by means of DNA testing. In the time that they take to interrogate these people, the forensics unit could be scanning and mapping their DNA profiles in order to compare to evidence. I’m absolutely blown away by this figure. I can only hope that it’s an accurate way to conduct such a test.
Ricky Osborne's comment, Today, 1:01 AM
The RapidHIT machine will do wonders in the field of law enforcement in the foreseeable future. Recovering and examining DNA in a crime scene is crucial in figuring out who did what and how it happened. This process of examining DNA unusually takes up to 2 full days to be completed through traditional methods. By being able to shorten this process to 90 mins will allow officer to go after criminals much more quickly. This window right after the crime occurs is important in whether or not the perpetrator is caught. The RapidHIT machine will allow for more criminals to be captured much more quickly through this technological advancement.
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It’s hard to keep caring - American Police Beat Magazine

It’s hard to keep caring - American Police Beat Magazine | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
By Lt Daniel Furseth Today, I stopped caring about my fellow man. I stopped caring about my community, my neighbors, and those I serve. I stopped caring today because a once noble profession has become despised, hated, distrusted, and mostly unwanted. I stopped caring today because parents refuse to teach their kids right from wrong...
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Is this a realistic viewpoint?  Is it the world that is messed up and the police profession that's o.k.?  I'm interested in your thoughts on this....

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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 21, 2:46 AM
He’s not wrong in some of the views that he points out. Society is going to hold a police officer to the flames if anything goes wrong. Overwork, underpaid and under-appreciated yes. I think this officer may have become jaded by the job he holds. Honestly if this is how he feels he needs to hang up his hat and retire. If your point of view is that low, than you will have a stereotype against the people that you serve. Police deal in human relations, and as we know there are some out there who suck. The police officer however has to rise above this and focus on the positives that come from the job. If he can not find the positives than he will become a plague to the others he works with. The ones he works with should be his brothers and sisters, and if he doesn't “care” for them than he is no help to the cause. I think some people just get burned out from the job, corruption, and negative public views will always be there. Law and order must be kept, and to do that you must believe in what you do or go elsewhere.
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The 7 Laws of Regenerative Enterprises

The 7 Laws of Regenerative Enterprises | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A theory-based approach.
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Jennifer Slingerland's comment, November 20, 10:36 PM
It’s no secret that management isn’t always the easiest job in the world, nor is it the most appreciated task in the world of business. The right manager can make a workplace bearable, but the wrong one can cause it to become a living hell. But where is the balance between encouraging employee productivity and regulating the ways in which employees behave? How strict is too strict, and where should things be overlooked for the sake of keeping a happy workplace? Gary Hamel certainly pushes the envelope with his idea of radically revising management structures, but I do have to agree that – as an employee – I would be much more open to a full overhaul of protocol than to have a few rules shifted or changed. If employers could begin focusing on inspiring their employees, things would run much more smoothly and allow for a better flow of information.
Of course, this would also be a great thing for Police Departments to consider. By completely overhauling a system, managers can begin from the bottom up, deciding what works and what doesn’t work in terms of promoting productivity. It would be incredibly beneficial for departments nationwide to encourage their managerial staff to begin really researching the ways in which the enterprise works. Maybe if a complete redesign were to transpire, the numbers of participants in corrupt behaviour would see a dramatic downturn.
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Police in Thailand Lay Down Weapons and Join with Protestors

Police in Thailand Lay Down Weapons and Join with Protestors | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In a stunning turn of events, Thailand police laid down their barricades and vests to join in solidarity with protestors.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Jennifer Slingerland's comment, November 20, 10:27 PM
This is absolutely stunning to see. After years of watching Cairo, Ukraine, London, Ferguson, New York, and many many MANY other protests end with tear gas, multiple arrests, and many injured citizens, it is refreshing to see a protest in which both sides decide to lay down their differences in order to cooperate. It’s incredible to see that the police have decided to join up with protestors after everything that has happened; and to think that it was possible all because the protestors explained why they were protesting at all… I hope everyone else takes a page from this and walks away with new tactics to deal with their own struggles. Police aren’t there to bully us all down and force us to live with corruption. They’re people, too. They abide by the same laws and operate under the same government that we do. Should we take the time to explain the importance of revolution in a manner which benefits everyone, then perhaps we’d see less people being held at gunpoint while they stand around chanting on behalf of change.
Ricky Osborne's comment, Today, 1:07 AM
Something like this would never happen in the United States its seems. Riot police have been shown to be indifferent and unattached to the protestors that they have been charged with. They are shown as tools being used by the government or state in which they are employed. This event in Thailand makes these officers seem human again. That is exactly what they are, they are human. They have goals and opinions of things that occur within their respective communities. This act of laying down their arms and sitting with the protestors they were charged with running off is both powerful and emotional. I’m glad to see something like this happening today.
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What Leaders Really Do

They don’t make plans; they don’t solve problems; they don’t even organize people. What leaders really do is prepare organizations for change and help them cope as they struggle through it.
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Prepare your organization for change.  The only constant is that things change....

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San Jose police chief got free 49ers tickets

San Jose police chief got free 49ers tickets | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
San Jose Police Chief Larry Esquivel, who last month barred his officers from moonlighting as private security guards for the 49ers, is now under investigation for accepting free tickets from the team, officials said Thursday. LaDoris Cordell, San Jose’s independent police auditor, confirmed Thursday that her office had received complaints about Esquivel; Assistant Chief Eddie Garcia, who is second in command; and Deputy Chief Jeff Marozick, who oversees the bureau of technical services. The
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Jennifer Slingerland's comment, November 20, 10:13 PM
This is ironic to be discussing during a segment in our lessons about police corruption. Chief Esquivel sounds as if he has a lot of explaining to do – especially to those officers that had requested to become temporary security for the same team. I can’t imagine that anyone in the station locker room is thrilled with Esquivel. Regardless, this calls into question the power of authority and how such situations are handled by Managerial support. It’s a bit too convenient that all the tickets were accidentally accepted by the Police Chief after they’d reported to the home of the defensive lineman. “Sorry everyone. I guess the tickets just sort of fell from his hand into my pocket.” All in all, though, it’s good to hear that they did end up purchasing the tickets fair and square. Looks like policies can work after all if the right people are around to continue keeping things in check.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 21, 2:56 AM
The officers accepted the tickets, I guess you could consider this a case of grass eaters. This case however is getting a little blown out of proportion since it was discovered after the high profile case of the domestic involving a 49er. I can see where it may seem like a conflict of interest the involvement in the case and the moonlight / gifts received. However would the department even have been under this much scrutiny if not for the recent rash of NFL cases and domestic violence being the top story? Now any police department who makes an arrest of an NFL player may face an internal investigation? Too many man-hours are being wasted on this nonsense and if they can discredit the officers than the player can potentially not be charged and save the football team millions, coincidence? I think not..
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Duped by Medill Innocence Project, Milwaukee man now free

Duped by Medill Innocence Project, Milwaukee man now free | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Alstory Simon — fooled into a confession that pushed Illinois to end the death penalty — is now free after 15 years behind bars.
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Rodney Ebersole's comment, November 14, 7:47 PM
Amazing that in the name of finding justice and not sending the wrong people to jail, that other people are forced into jail for crimes they didn't commit. Simon sounds like a lost soul who was at the wrong place at the wrong time. He was an easy target given the fact he was high and he was in the vicinity of the crime. I can't imagine losing 15 years of my life over being played by the people involved in this case. Why any of the original people involved in this case are not in jail themselves for the lies they told are troubling to me. How many other people were coerced into testifying for a crime they didn't commit?
Rob Duke's comment, November 14, 11:56 PM
Yes, it's surprising that we're not hearing more about this...
Maria Hejl's comment, November 20, 2:38 AM
This reminds me of a case we watched a video on in my Juvenile Justice class I took at USC. There were young minority teen boys who were in the wrong place at the wrong time, and were picked up by the police and then coerced into confessing to crimes they did not commit. They were held in questioning for days without food, sleep or to see family. It sad to see that police officers are misusing their power to convict whoever they see fit rather than finding the real criminals. I agree with Rodney that those who were responsible for they lies they told should be in jail and it is very unsettling that they are not having to somehow make up the time lost by the man they wrongfully imprisoned.
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Marijuana milestone

Marijuana milestone | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
BESIDES choosing lawmakers, on November 4th voters in three American states and the District of Columbia considered measures to liberalise the cannabis trade. Alaska...
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Rashaad's curator insight, November 12, 10:37 PM

Not coming from a bias standpoint at all but I do not see the problem that marijuana can have, that would stand as something that is worst than alcohol. Therefore I do not see the problem with legalizing marijuana. There are much more things going on in the world that is way more important to focus on. Along side of that, do to the fact that marijuana is so popular in the world today, it is not a drug that is hard to come across and partake in using regardless if it were legal or not. In other cases I do although I do feel as if there are people that would benefit from legalization based on their medical history and the fact that it is a drug that can be beneficial in curing what even the medical problem is with a certain individual. Referring to my person experience and upbringing, there have been plenty of times when I was in high school in which that marijuana was presented to me. I personally do not smoke, but I do have friends that are heavy smokers and it was no problem for them to get their hands on marijuana at any moment. I say this because like I stated above whether it is legal or not, it is going to be used by those who have a habit or just feel like partaking in smoking weed. 

Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 15, 3:19 AM
Its interesting to follow the changing laws state to state. Until the Federal government changes the classification of Marijuana it still wont change too much. I have already received the “notifications” and reminders stating federal law trumps state law and for those involved with the federal government it is still against the law to have anything to do with Marijuana. Opinions have changed, but than again you have a city in MA who is trying to make smoking anything in general banned. There are still companies who are against the legalization because they don't want it to affect their company. Fear of industrial Hemp,Hemp would be an ideal source of biomass for fuel, and hemp Ethanol burns very cleanly. Also pharmaceutical companies would rather have you take a pain pill which you become addicted to, than use medical marijuana for cancer pain treatment. I wonder what big changes will be in the next five years time.
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Community Post: “IF IN DOUBT…TAKE IT!” Behind Closed Doors, Government Officials Make Shocking Comments About Civil Forfeiture

Community Post: “IF IN DOUBT…TAKE IT!” Behind Closed Doors, Government Officials Make Shocking Comments About Civil Forfeiture | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
There are three kinds of people in this world: Those who're outraged by civil forfeiture, those who don't know what it is and those who profit from it.
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Maria Hejl's comment, November 20, 2:44 AM
I really dislike the civil forfeiture law. To know that at any given day for any given reason an officer could pull me over and take anything I have based on the fact that a drug dog might have mistakenly signaled that they smelled something and after a vehicle search they find absolutely nothing but can take my car or anything in it because they feel it was necessary. They can also profit from the civil forfeiture which makes it even that more disturbing. This should not be legal.
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Ferguson police’s other sin: Why grand jury must probe Brown shooting’s aftermath

Ferguson police’s other sin: Why grand jury must probe Brown shooting’s aftermath | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
As we wait to hear the grand jury's decision, one part of the horrific episode is getting way too little attention
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The Marlboro of marijuana

The Marlboro of marijuana | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“FRESH and fruity, right?” says a bright-eyed young man behind the counter, wafting an open jar of something called “AK-47” under Schumpeter’s nose....
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Ricky Osborne's comment, November 8, 10:47 PM
I see there being a lot of benefits with the legalization of marijuana. This new legal drug will take the money out of the criminal’s hands and put it in those law abiding citizens. These drugs can be regulated and be maintained at a higher level than possible when such was deemed illegal. The influx of income the state will receive from the sale of legal marijuana will be another positive aspect. This money can go towards much needed projects around the state. The criminal justice system will also be less burdened as less arrests will be made. All in all the legalization of marijuana will affect the state of Alaska in a positive manner.
Brittney Ward's comment, November 13, 2:18 PM
Legalization of marijuana will contribute to increased state funds through taxation. I think at this point legalization was really inevitable, it was going to happen eventually. With the right legislation and regulation I can see this being a positive thing. Police will be able to focus on other areas of crime and money will go back into the state.
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Suicide, murder, despair. Coalition government makes its mark on prisons

Suicide, murder, despair. Coalition government makes its mark on prisons | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Justice minister Chris Grayling is imposing a ‘more Spartan’ prison regime — with deadly consequences.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Making Dumb Groups Smarter

Making Dumb Groups Smarter | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Since the beginning of human history, people have made decisions in groups. As the saying goes, two heads are better than one. If so, then three heads should be better than two, and four better still. With a hundred or a thousand, then, things are bound to go well—hence the supposed wisdom of crowds. The […]
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CHP nude photo scandal: When can police search your phone?

CHP nude photo scandal: When can police search your phone? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The answers can be murky as interpretations of the Constitution catch up to technology. A recent Supreme Court decision requiring law enforcement agencies to get a warrant to search a suspect's smartphone still leaves gray areas and the recent Dublin CHP nude photo scandal raises concerns.
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How the Prison-Industrial Complex Kills People For Profit • BRAVE NEW FILMS: JUSTICE


Failing to provide sick prisoners with needed care turns out to be pretty good for Corizon's profits. WATCH MORE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6vuY... SUBSCRIBE:http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

While Corizon's new CEO Woodrow A. Myers claims that his company "save[s] lives instead of tak[ing] them," sick inmates continue to die due to their neglect and refusal to render even the most basic of medical services. This is the the "Get-Rich-Quick" plan that's actually killing people.

This video is part of the Prison Profiteers series produced by Brave New Foundation's Beyond Bars campaign in partnership with the ACLU and The Nation. Narration by Henry Rollins. Research help provided by Prison Legal News.

http://aclu.org/corizon #prisonprofiteers


Via Darcy Delaproser
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Jennifer Slingerland's comment, November 20, 10:07 PM
It isn’t at all surprising to hear that Corizon is profiteering from sick prisoners; if it hadn’t been them, it certainly would have been someone else. Unfortunately, this entire situation brings forth the question of how much the public actually cares about prisoners. Are the people who’ve committed crimes in our nation worthy of the care that it takes to say ‘yes, this is absolutely wrong and these people are entitled to healthcare?’ Or would the cries of outrage begin as soon as the issue is mentioned to the general public? In a nation where the Affordable Healthcare Act is constantly under fire for providing healthcare to innocent citizens in the U.S., I can’t imagine that many would agree with Brave New Foundation’s Behind Bars campaign. Then again, a large majority of the country disagrees with gun control and then acts shocked when elementary schools are shot up, so who knows exactly how the public would feel about this one. If I were to make a wager, it’d probably be that this campaign will have a steep hill to climb before they begin seeing any progress.
M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, November 21, 6:45 PM

Prison for Profit

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LAPD survey finds bias complaints

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A survey of 500 Los Angeles Police Department employees found widespread concerns among officers and civilians that the department's internal discipline system is deeply flawed and discriminates based on gender, ethnicity and rank, according to a report.
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Will suicide spur action on police officers with PTSD?

Will suicide spur action on police officers with PTSD? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
EJ Montini: As the head of the police officers union says, if we accept PTSD with soldiers, why not with officers?
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Clay Faris's comment, November 17, 7:07 AM
This makes sense. To be honest I'd not realized that we had a problem recognizing PTSD amongst officers. Any violent encounter can lead, ostensibly, to PTSD. Though I'm reluctant to term every bad reaction or choice to PTSD, certainly we can directly link things like this. If it's not being recognized it ought to be.
Maria Hejl's comment, November 20, 2:28 AM
I agree. Some experiences that officers endure would warrant psychological treatment for PTSD just as Soldiers who serve in a combat zone do. Just as the military is working on getting rid of the stigma that comes with seeking help for PTSD. However I don't think it should be misused as their way out of bad policing.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 21, 2:29 AM
It would be great if there were better programs set up to battle PTSD, however I think it is still too much of a stigma on officers and they fear seeking help will lead to discipline or being pulled from the job. The article mentions how officers act as de facto mental health providers, this is very true. They are expected to deal with such a large variety of people who suffer mental health, but can not be viewed as having a problem themselves. Its still a hush hush subject, but at the same time well known, without a solution or the proper support.
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Anchorage legislator wants to clarify marijuana rules come January

Anchorage legislator wants to clarify marijuana rules come January | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Anchorage Rep. Bob Lynn said he plans to introduce legislation clarifying restrictions on marijuana sales in Alaska, hoping to start a discussion on how to regulate the substance.
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Brittney Ward's comment, November 13, 1:46 PM
This article raises some good points about what is expected to come with legalization of marijuana and I agree that legislation to regulate, the main idea behind legalizing marijuana needs to be in place. The idea Lynn has on developing a board similar to the ABC (alcohol beverage control) board for marijuana is a great idea in my opinion. There needs to be structure in place in regard to legislation and even in policing the use now that it is legal.
Clay Faris's comment, November 17, 7:00 AM
Brittney, I agree that some regulation is needed, however my concern is that the legislators, amidst pressure from various outside groups and interests, will use the "regulation" as another and ongoing method to keep marijuana illegal and basically ignore the voice of the people of the state. Some structure is already in place (i.e. - the alcohol regulatory board & DUI laws), while some additional structure is necessary, not as much as they're making it sound like.
Jennifer Slingerland's comment, November 20, 10:19 PM
First off, I do have to say that this is a great step forward in terms of decriminalization of recreational drugs as a whole. Too many people are processed for possessing this stuff that it’s gotten a bit out of hand. By implementing ways in which the public may now access safe marijuana for legal use, I believe the over-populated prisons will begin to see some alleviation in inmate population. By making it available to all, it really does cut down on the need for peddlers and smugglers of the drug. Of course, as I’ve seen in my experience at the USAO, this may lead to other types of bootlegging and drug-running, but perhaps it will open a doorway toward complete regulation of recreational drug use. If the people want to get high, at least make sure the provisions are in place to guarantee that they’re safe while they use it.
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Police Use Department Wish List When Deciding Which Assets to Seize

Police Use Department Wish List When Deciding Which Assets to Seize | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police officers and prosecutors give tips on civil asset forfeiture, the practice allowing the government, without ever filing a criminal charge, to seize property believed to have ties to crime, in seminars across the country.
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Rodney Ebersole's comment, November 14, 8:26 PM
I have no problem with seizing a vehicle from a DUI incident as I have very little compassion for people who choose to drink and drive. However after reading this article I have to wonder if there is more bad than good being done with civil asset forfeiture and if affluent people are being targeted. There needs to be regulations in place so houses are not forfeited unless very serious crimes are committed in them and cars and household materials are not forfeited for small crimes. It sounds like there is very little rules in what a police officer can take in a civil asset forfeiture, without strict rules in place I see an area of easy corruption.
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Four wrongfully convicted men, four very different outcomes | PBS NewsHour

Four wrongfully convicted men, four very different outcomes | PBS NewsHour | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
When a wrongfully convicted person gets released from prison, it is a major news event: Local television crews capture the first steps of freedom and the speeches on the steps of the state capital, audiences empathize as they grapple with gratitude and rage, and the exonerees take their first steps into an uncertain future. Continue reading →
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Rachael Toy's comment, November 13, 3:42 AM
Oh how I hate this topic. I feel so sad for these men. I couldn’t even begin to fathom what is must feel like to know you are telling the truth, to know you didn’t do it, and then to spend years and years in a horrible place for nothing. It can completely steal your life. The one guy really caught me off guard when he said he was 16 when convicted and didn’t even have a driver’s license now at like 33 years old, which is such an intense image. The technology change, having no money, job, or a lot to fall back on would make it a very difficult process to go from jail to a regular productive john doe in society. No matter what the crime or punishment, wrongful imprisonment is horrible but how do you fix it? I don’t want innocent people in jail, heck I wouldn’t ever want to be in jail but at the same time how do you stop setting criminal free? What systems would work that would stop innocent people going to jail while still being able to convict those that are guilty. I don’t think there is such a system that is going to be full proof enough to stop these types of mistakes and it is very sad.
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Woman killed in crash outside home after police call off chase

Woman killed in crash outside home after police call off chase | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A woman is killed in a crash just metres from her own home after police earlier chased a car travelling at high speed in Tasmania's north.
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Brittney Ward's comment, November 13, 1:38 PM
Rachel I agree, this is a tricky situation to judge. I don't think the officer is responsible here. The driver chose to drive the car in that condition and refused to pull over for the police making him responsible for the accident.
Rob Duke's comment, November 13, 6:08 PM
Some courts have ruled that the appropriate metaphor is as if an officer has a stick between the cars that pushes the offender forward; while other courts have used a string metaphor that pulls the officer's vehicle along behind the fleeing offender. Officers are trained and, presumably, more rational than offenders, so I think we are correct to expect them to be able to use judgement and call off chases where there's no suspicion of serious wrong-doing; or when we know who the offender is and can pick them up later when we won't unduly jeopardize others. It's annoying to call off a pursuit, but it's often the right thing to do.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 15, 3:26 AM
This is a tragic case. They say that most vehicle accidents do occur not far from home, but this one is just sad. Im sure the department had to have some policy in place for chases. They were in a residential area and decided to not go the same speed as the person in the blue car. It is not the fault of the police, but of the driver of the blue car who continued to drive recklessly and kill a person. After an internal investigation Im sure the officers will be clear, but regardless I am sure they wish they could have prevented the accident from happening in the first place. Everything changes in an instant and its not like you can just get on your loud speaker and tell the drivers to stop, its out of the officers control.