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Police and Crime Commissioners - A Level Politics

Police and Crime Commissioners - A Level Politics | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Commissioners are elected representatives who have the role of securing efficient and effective policing of police policy area thus replacing police authorities. The police and Crime commissioner post was created in England ...
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Implementation of police state delayed… again… now scheduled for summer 2015

Implementation of police state delayed… again… now scheduled for summer 2015 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Sources close to the conspiracy to turn the US into a police state controlled by an emperor report that plans have been delayed, again.
Rob Duke's insight:

Um? This satire might not be all that helpful...

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GAME OVER? Official Autopsy Suggests Michael Brown Was Not Surrendering, Attempted to Take Officer's Gun - Bearing Arms

GAME OVER? Official Autopsy Suggests Michael Brown Was Not Surrendering, Attempted to Take Officer's Gun - Bearing Arms | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
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Forensic expert urges caution on Michael Brown autopsy analysis

Forensic expert urges caution on Michael Brown autopsy analysis | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An official autopsy report on Michael Brown may bolster his killer's story. But a forensics expert who reviewed the report warns against jumping to conclusions.
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Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps

Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

"Spatial analysis has always been a hallmark of GIS, the 'numerical recipes' which set GIS apart from other forms of computerized visualization and information management. With GIS we pose questions and derive results using a wide array of analytical tools to help us understand and compare places, determine how places are related, find the best locations and paths, detect and quantify patterns, and even to make spatial predictions."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 7:50 PM

GIS is a key tool in spatial analysis, but it can also be a driving force in using math, science, technology and (yes) geography as interdisciplinary ways of teaching the curriculum.  StoryMaps can be rich with images and videos, but also filled with data at a variety of scales.  What stories can you tell in this rich, visual format?  What visual template shown might lend itself best for that sort of project? 


Tagsmapping, CSV, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

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Lompoc Police Officer Arrested

Lompoc Police Officer Arrested | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Lompoc Police Chief Patrick Walsh has been on the job for about a month and  now has a third officer who's been criminally charged this year while off-duty.
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Crooked Cop Let Woman Off In Exchange For Oral Sex: Police

Crooked Cop Let Woman Off In Exchange For Oral Sex: Police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Florida sheriff's deputy faces felony charges after officials said he accepted oral sex from a woman in exchange for not arresting her.

Ted Arboleda, 32, was arrested Monday. He is charged with unlawful compensation or reward for official behav...
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Buffalo police officer fired for allegedly threatening to kill woman - The Buffalo News

Buffalo police officer fired for allegedly threatening to kill woman  - The Buffalo News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Buffalo Police Officer Ann Vanyo, while on duty about two years ago, allegedly threatened to kill a woman she thought was making moves on her boyfriend, who is also a Buffalo police officer.An independent hearing officer who presided over the 42-year-old Vanyo’s July 23 disciplinary... - The Buffalo News
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's a soap opera tale that will illustrate some of the problems with big city policing....

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That’s me in the picture: Kevin Berthia on the Golden Gate bridge

That’s me in the picture: Kevin Berthia on the Golden Gate bridge | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Each week, we reveal the story behind an iconic image
Rob Duke's insight:

You never know...the impact...

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Rich Guys Try To Kick Poor Kids Off Their Own Playing Field, Get A Life Lesson Instead (VIDEO)

Rich Guys Try To Kick Poor Kids Off Their Own Playing Field, Get A Life Lesson Instead (VIDEO) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
This is what happened when a group of wealthy, white tech workers in San Francisco attempted to kick a group of local kids off their playing field -- they got a life lesson they'll never forget.
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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, October 16, 2:31 AM
I feel that this is ridiculous that people think they can do anything if they have money. Those guys just thought they can do anything they want and abuse their power. Hold on a second. They don’t even have such a power to act like that in the shared-public space, where everyone is welcome. Also, I am a sportsman myself, and I never saw or had such an issue. Usually people are only happy if you will join their team, or will play with them. I think it is totally the problem of rich folks who is trying to show off.
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City Leaders Say Police Unions Have Obstructed Stop-And-Frisk Reform

NEW YORK -- It’s a story Nicholas Peart has told many times. On his 18th birthday, he walked to a Brooklyn McDonald’s with his cousin and a friend. The McDonald’s was closed, so the trio sat down on a nearby bench and shot the breez...
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Ricky Osborne's comment, October 15, 8:49 PM
The contentious stop and frisk policy of the NYPD is in the spotlight once again. This policy needs to be removed as it violates the rights of minorities across the city, especially those of Latino or black descent. I could not envision myself living in a place that allows officers to stop me with no justification and search me. There have got to be better methods of policing and protecting the public than those that violate the civil rights of citizens who live in a country that prides itself on freedom. The stop and frisk policy is an illegal one and should be disbanded immediately.
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10 Shocking Reasons to End the Drug War (And Consider Legalization and Regulation)

10 Shocking Reasons to End the Drug War (And Consider Legalization and Regulation) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
This is not your ordinary Top 10 Buzzfeed list. Law Enforcement Against Prohibition , a group of law enforcement officials opposed to the war on drugs, created this list to show why the War on Drug...
Rob Duke's insight:

What a great quote in the comments: "you can get over addiction, but not a conviction".

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Jennifer Slingerland's comment, October 15, 6:07 PM
I think one of the most intriguing and infuriating sections is where they talk about asset forfeiture. If anyone here watches Last Night Tonight on HBO, there's a great segment explaining the process of how the police obtain the money (http://youtu.be/3kEpZWGgJks). I hadn't thought much of it until this segment, at which point I realized exactly what my coworkers in charge of civil asset forfeiture were managing. Even though most of the people involved are cleared of any charges (usually drug-related), their items are held and used by the county sheriff's offices to fund miscellaneous expenditures. It's appalling to believe that your property is guilty until proven innocent. Talk about incorrectly prioritizing in order to fight the drug war.
Rodney Ebersole's comment, October 15, 6:21 PM
Interesting article that shed light on what the government and police force is doing to try and deal with the drug ward and why it isn't working. I think the drug issue is a very difficult one to fix, some minor drugs really don't cause many issues but they are still treated as if they will turn the user into a monster who eats people. Yes, highly addictive drugs cause all sorts of problems but even heroin users who are only hurting themselves don't need to be thrown in jail for twenty years. If getting them clean is the best answer then why aren't drug users being put in treatment facilities or given cars with breathalyzers installed to detect drug use like DUI criminals are? It seems like the current system is designed to make the most money and not to actually fix the problem.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 17, 2:56 AM
The statistics in this article are sad but true. The war on drugs is not working and something needs to be fixed. Incarceration is no longer the answer to drug crimes. Also it pointed out the fact that the government makes profit out of seizing property. I think that if someone has not been charged with the crime than the goods should be given back to the owner. I was watching a documentary on glass blowers who made pipes for smokers. They were busted by the DEA and they seized thousands of dollars, and other items which were never returned. The makers of the glass never supplied or sold drugs but still had to pay for it due to the war on drugs. The mexican cartels also survive on the black-market drug trade in the US decriminalizing it may help lower this crime. However if you make more drugs legal, we need more rehabilitation clinics for the people who have drug addiction disease. They need proper resources to cope and keep clean.
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Hundreds of HK police use sledgehammers and chainsaws to dismantle protest barriers

Hundreds of HK police use sledgehammers and chainsaws to dismantle protest barriers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hundreds of Hong Kong police used sledgehammers and chainsaws to dismantle pro-democracy barricades near government offices and the city's financial center on Tuesday, a day after
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Niki Wilson's comment, October 15, 4:05 AM
By now the entire world should be aware of the fact that police using forceful methods as a means of protestor control never really works out. More often than not it provokes the protestors even more. These people fighting against the government have adopted an interesting way of doing so and the police selectively taking down barriers and allowing protestors to stay is a much better means of control.
Jennifer Slingerland's comment, October 15, 6:15 PM
The amount of brutality that the police are showing these protesters is astounding, though not unheard of. At the end of the day, I do believe that they have a job to do, and that's to simply clear the streets to get Hong Kong in order again. Tearing down protester-erected barriers honestly doesn't seem like that big of a deal. If it's blocking traffic of any kind, it shouldn't be there in the first place. Does that justify the way the police are confronting the protesters beyond the barriers? Absolutely not. But hopefully those protesting will listen and begin to make compromises in order to effectively demonstrate their opinions. It's hardly fair to anyone having to commute to work, hospital, or school to have to wait around so long because the protesters won't listen and get out of the way of traffic.
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Another Marijuana Raid in San Diego; Cop Wears 'F*** The Growers' T-Shirt

Another Marijuana Raid in San Diego; Cop Wears 'F*** The Growers' T-Shirt | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
There is no shortage of headlines in the news these days about police officers abusing their power and denying citizens...
Rob Duke's insight:

Cops like to be independent, but someone has to supervise so this kind of dumb mistake and arrogant mindset don't become so entrenched that a cop can wear this blatantly arrogant shirt.  The other issue here is to what extent do public servants get away with saying one of two things, both of which sit on the "slippery slope": 1. It's just my job to enforce the law, not decide if the law is right; or 2. I don't agree with that law, so I'm going to enforce something else.  One of these allows Jim Crow laws, for instance, to exist when public administrators don't question the morality of the laws they enforce; and, the other means that public administrators are aggrandizing themselves above the people, above the legislature, and above the "rule of law".  We need a theory and method for dealing with this paradox.

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Evidence supports officer’s account of shooting in Ferguson

Michael Brown and Darren Wilson fought for the officer’s gun, interviews and the autopsy indicate.
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Federal Forfeiture Program: What's It Funding?

Since 2008, 5,400 police departments and task forces have spent $2.5 billion in federally forfeited property. Yet the taken property overwhelmingly came from people who have done nothing wrong.
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Judge tosses lawsuit by Seattle police officers

Judge tosses lawsuit by Seattle police officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A federal judge has thrown out a lawsuit brought by more than 100 Seattle police officers who said new guidelines on using force jeopardized their safety.
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Two SWAT raids. Two officers dead. One defendant is black, one white. Guess what happened.

Two SWAT raids. Two officers dead. One defendant is black, one white. Guess what happened. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The two cases in Texas, just 100 miles from each other, raise troubling questions about race and "no-knock" police raids.
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Oath Upheld: Nashville Cops Refused Secret Service Request for Illegal Search of Obama Critic

Following Secret Service Director Julia Pierson's recent resignation over a major security breach at the White House, new allegations are facing the president'
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Where pot is legal: Seattle cannabis edibles company hopes to bring product line to Alaska

Where pot is legal: Seattle cannabis edibles company hopes to bring product line to Alaska | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Brothers Patrick, Dan and Michael Devlin are hoping to stake their claim in Washington’s “Green Rush” as entrepreneurs scramble to cash in on the newly legalized marijuana market. The company’s Zoots product line will be some of the first edibles sold. 
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The nurse who broke protocol~

The nurse who broke protocol~ | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
And here you will read the true story of a nurse who broke protocol. I held the bloody hand of an HIV+ patient without gloving. About three weeks ago. I was walking down the hallway when I heard ye...
Rob Duke's insight:

Wouldn't it be nice, if police culture was just like this....I'd argue that it is, but that we have a tainted profession like a dentist where the help we give is often accompanied by pain (not from us, but easy enough to associate with us)....

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How to (Gradually) Become a Different Company

How to (Gradually) Become a Different Company | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Five tips for shifting your core business.
Rob Duke's insight:

If we recognize all the organizational, societal, and institutional forces that influence police problems like abuse and corruption; we will realize that we need to know how to change organizations and how to lead change.

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Private Donors Supply Spy Gear to Cops

Private Donors Supply Spy Gear to Cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
There's little public scrutiny when private donors pay to give police controversial technology and weapons. Sometimes, companies are donors to the same foundations that purchase their products for police.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Rob Duke's insight:

Hmmm...is this because the rich want the police to patrol the boundaries of society?

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Jennifer Slingerland's comment, October 15, 6:22 PM
It's really unfortunate to see these sort of closeted deals going on, but I have to wonder if the system isn't broken beyond repair at this point. It's much like the way lobbyists treat government officials - you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours. It's horrible, it's shady, and it's worthy of the scrutiny it deserves. However, this is the first I'd ever heard of it, and I'm sure there are many others who are in the dark about it as well. How often do you find yourself wondering 'hm, I wonder who's donating to the police foundation in my area today, and how they're allocating the grants they receive?' Chances are, very few people do think about this. Hopefully it becomes more widespread in order to begin allowing scrutiny to analyse these types of deals. Ridiculous.
Sarah O'Leary's comment, October 16, 1:56 AM
This is more a form of socially biased justice than the fronted "financially enhanced justice." If the rich and private companies are able to contribute in ways such as this, it is the same as corrupt political influence. It is shocking to see that this type of corruption has such a widespread back door.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 17, 2:38 AM
“But critics say police foundations operate with little transparency or oversight and can be a way for wealthy donors and corporations to influence law enforcement agencies' priorities”. After reading the article and reading that sentence I really think that is what it is all about. There is also a big conflict of interest but no one seems to care because it did not come from public funding. It would be great if this equipment was donated with no private agenda and they were not pressured by outside parties. However I don't think this is the case and the equipment still comes with a large price tag to the department.
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Yes, It's Legal To Film The Cops -- And What's Been Filmed In Recent Months Is Appalling

Yes, It's Legal To Film The Cops -- And What's Been Filmed In Recent Months Is Appalling | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
NEW YORK -- It's becoming clearer and clearer that smartphones have ushered in a new era of police accountability. Since mid-July, when a bystander on Staten Island filmed the death of Eric Garner in a prohibited police chokehold, at least eight othe...

Via Darcy Delaproser
Rob Duke's insight:

Yes, it's legal, but stay out of the way and stay out of the line of fire...that's some of what cops get annoyed about...even the ones that agree that you have a right to digitally record them.

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Sarah O'Leary's comment, October 16, 2:03 AM
To me, it seems the people who are MOST concerned with taking these videos of these interactions, have something to hide OR are already pre-disposed to not trust cops or are trying to find them fail. Now even though this is a generalization, I understand this does not cover all aspects. These videos don't either. They don't show anything leading up to the altercations, they don't show these peoples pasts or even their intentions. What if the tables were turned and the outcome was different and the man had gotten ahold of a cop and killed him instead. Then how would it be any different. We can not simply say they deserve it because they were resisting, however, by submitting to police and cooperating, there would be less chance of injury.
Zach Bohan's comment, October 16, 8:31 PM
Police may not want to be video taped because it could limit what is necessary to do for the enforcement of the law. However, it is obviously necessary that police need monitoring. This is just one of man examples of power being given to those who cannot properly wield it. Police have to held accountable for their choices. They may have to get physical occasionally with worse people for information in order to protect the greater good and would not be able to if they are being filmed. However, because they can't control themselves in simple situations, video accountability is a must.
Brandon Jensen's comment, October 17, 1:26 AM
I do believe that some sort of police monitoring may be necessary in some places but it has to be done right. Of course in some of these videos we can not see what has happened from the beginning so we could only be getting half the story so there is that to take into account. Many other situations however, I notice that there are things that the cops do to people that is excessive so I am leaning a bit more towards monitoring of cops when it comes to certain places.