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Massive Manhunt on for Ex-Cop Accused of Killing

Los Angeles police say officers guarding a target in an ex-officer's manifesto shot and wounded multiple people in Torrance,California who were in a pickup. ...

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Brandon Barnes's comment, February 8, 2013 8:13 AM
Well when I saw this video I immidiately had to jump on facebook and make sure my friend from the USMC was ok because he is a police officer down in Riverside CA. I'm glad to find out he's ok. This just goes to show that being a police officer can be a very hard job, and dangerous. There is always the possibility of getting hurt even though many police are trying to help people and stop crime. I hope this man is captured very soon and this story along with the Marine that killed the Navy SEAL Sniper goes to show you that there are severe problems coming from some of the people that were supposed to be serving the country or community. I really wonder about those type of military and police that end up murdering innocent people here in the US, and I doubt they joined those agencies for the same types of reasons as most others did.
Melanie Wright's comment, February 9, 2013 2:17 AM
It is really unfortunate and sad to hear about things like this because although he may have been one officer that went off the deep end, it breaks trust among the community with police officers. As we've been reading it is really important that trust be there in order to achieve cooperation towards crime prevention. This causes me to question whether all of the hard power exerted by military officials and police captains is really necessary and whether or not it's the underlying cause for events like this. I also wonder if he displayed any signs before hand. I realize behavioral science is in no way perfect and nobody ever really knows how somebody with free will is going to act but it has come a long way and it seems they're usually pretty accurate. I feel that if they are to keep these institutions with all of this hard power they should be keeping closer tabs on the officer's mental state and behavior.

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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Can Authorities Cut Off Utilities And Pose As Repairmen To Search A Home?

That's what federal agents did earlier this year to see if gamblers staying in Las Vegas were running a sportsbook operation. Agents lacked evidence for a warrant. Courts are considering the case.
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Federal civil rights charges unlikely against police officer in Ferguson shooting

Federal civil rights charges unlikely against police officer in Ferguson shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Federal investigators have all but concluded that they don’t have a strong enough case.
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Eric Frein, suspect in Pennsylvania trooper ambush, arrested without incident

Eric Frein, suspect in Pennsylvania trooper ambush, arrested without incident | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Eric Frein, the suspect in the deadly ambush of a Pennsylvania state trooper, has been taken into custody after a month-long manhunt, the Pennsylvania State Police announced Thursday night.
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Brandon Jensen's comment, October 31, 1:14 AM
it is good this man was finally caught and can finally answer for what he did. A very unfortunate situation and I am glad it ended without incident, the last thing people need is more violence.
Clay Faris's comment, October 31, 8:22 AM
Cowards are never willing to face the music or go out in a blaze of glory. This guy sickens me, though I'm not at all surprised he went out with a whimper. My intent was to provide an eloquent diatribe with this post, but all I've been able to do so far is become more and more angry about the whole situation.
Rob Duke's comment, Today, 12:42 AM
Yeah, if he'd have gone out guns blazing, he might have been a folk-hero for some--now he'll just be another guy who gets to spend his life in prison.
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Loud voices and deaf ears

Loud voices and deaf ears | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
IN SUNDAY'S Observer, a British chief constable wrote a witty and forceful article denouncing the war on drugs. Mike Barton, of Durham Police, argues that "if the...
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Clay Faris's comment, October 31, 8:39 AM
Yep. "Drugs are illegal because they are dangerous. They destroy lives and blight communities". Let's not talk about the fact that many thousands more people die every year from alcohol abuse than from all illegal drugs combined. Prohibition simply doesn't work, and it's high time we stop sticking our collective heads in the sand about this issue. I don't know that total legalization is the answer, but anything is better than what we're doing now.
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Everything you wanted to know about legalizing marijuana (but weren't sure you could ask)

Everything you wanted to know about legalizing marijuana (but weren't sure you could ask) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In a few months, Alaskans will decide whether to legalize recreational marijuana. Here's what we know (so far) about how that might look.
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Mamie Davis's comment, October 30, 2:36 AM
I think the legalization of marijuana if just a tipping point towards anarchy and chaos. What I mean by that is people can’t say “we should legalize marijuana because it will take it off the black market, save criminal justice resources and provide a new source of income for states” and think that is a good enough reason. The same would be true of any drug that is legal that the government could chose to legalize. If we are going to legalize marijuana, why not meth? or cocaine? It would take those drugs off the black market, remove power from the hands of gangs and drug cartels, make sales and use safer for users, create a revenue source and remove all drug users from using the criminal justice system.
Rob Duke's comment, October 30, 3:23 AM
Um? I think I agree. If you're arguing for a public health/harm reduction model where we decriminalize use, but still crack down on those who push drugs...
Clay Faris's comment, October 30, 5:21 AM
I think the idea that legalizing marijuana leads inexorably to anarchy is fear mongering. I don't see any compelling reasons to avoid legalizing it at this point, and I believe this process we're currently seeing nationally of individual states legalizing marijuana represents nullification. At a certain point we'll reach a tipping point where the feds will have no choice but to follow suit. That said, I have some concerns about the current proposition that I believe are not being addressed (for example: how to deal with the consumables market, what happens with tax revenue given the federal prohibition, etc). Concerns aside, change won't happen if we constantly wring our hands and worry about the "what-ifs". I'm willing to allow the details be worked out after the fact.
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'Blimp in a Box' Deployed in Search for Cop-Killer Suspect Eric Frein - NBC News

'Blimp in a Box' Deployed in Search for Cop-Killer Suspect Eric Frein - NBC News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Pennsylvania police have deployed a $180,000 "blimp in a box" — a tethered helium balloon equipped with cameras — to search dense woods for suspect...
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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, October 29, 10:20 PM

Rob you find some great articles! It's amazing whats out there to find criminals. This semester I have found an even more interest and respect for the police and what they do for us. I don't believe Eric Frein is in the area they are thinking. If this was a well thought out plan I don't see Eric staying in the area, he has an escape route. The camp gear they spotted is a deterrence. If he is involved in a mass group of extremists I believe they are assisting him and not only aware of the plans but involved. It looks like American extremists group that thinks they are training for a mission they may be skilled but they will be caught but probably not where they would expect.

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Fairbanks crisis negotiators work behind the scene

Fairbanks crisis negotiators work behind the scene | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — Much of the police work was going on behind the scenes last month when a police armored vehicle approached a suicidal man with a handgun in a Chena Pump Road-area parking lot.
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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, October 30, 12:28 AM
This article shows that technologies do help improve policing, especially when negotiating with criminals. Who knows what would of happened if there wouldn’t be invented cell phones? Also, in this situation, I think police made a good call on how they should act.
Mamie Davis's comment, October 30, 2:57 AM
I had never considered the aspect to negotiations cited in the article as imperative to resolving negotiations peacefully: time. It makes sense though, that length of time would directly correspond to higher likelihood of resolution for any negotiation. Why? Basic human nature means we can’t stay mad forever. It’s a very simple premise but a very important one for the negotiators. Really there job to to do or say anything in their power to diffuse the situation and eventually reach that peaceful resolution. I think it is good that they don’t let the suspect speak with other people when they are trying to negotiate with him. I had never considered it before, and certainly never thought about it in a negative light, but the officers are right. You never know if the person they want to talk to is going to help or hurt the situation, and in a high stakes negotiation that’s really a risk you can’t afford to take. I think the public also has a duty to avoid speaking with such suspects during negotiations, especially with cellphones so readily accessible these days.
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Police officer fired for ignoring woman's pleas

Police officer fired for ignoring woman's pleas | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
According to the DPD, Senior Corporal Leslie Richardson responded
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Zach Bohan's comment, October 30, 1:46 AM
This is a shame that someone with a legal obligation to assist another person did not feel a moral obligation to help and chose to do nothing. He chose to check on a burglary scene instead of trying to stop a kidnapping. I wonder if he feels guilty for the death of the kidnapper, something he may have been able to prevent had he chosen to act. Maybe he would feel guilty if something had happened to the children. He should be brought up on negligence charges.
Clay Faris's comment, October 30, 5:37 AM
This is difficult to stomach. I don't want to "Monday morning quarterback" this thing, but it really seems like this cop just didn't want to get involved. This is why we do this job man! This is exactly why. I don't understand the mindset on display here.
Melia Markell's comment, October 30, 4:26 PM
This piece is actually really interesting as I think it highlights the exact opposite of what Egon Bittner had talked about in his article that police officers will basically drop whatever they are doing when a true emergency/crime fighting problem occurs. This officer had no regard for the fact that individuals (even kids) were in danger and that the suspect they were dealing with was killed due to his dangerous actions. I don’t think that anyone would ever be able to defend the officer by saying that maybe he didn’t want to deal with potentially dangerous suspect because one, that’s his job as an office to protect and serve his community, and two, the obscene comment that he made to the victim as he drove off away from her. According to Bittner’s theory, that officer should have dropped what he was doing and responded to that call as it’s something that most officer’s dream of having a chance to do as most of their work is menial tasks. But what Bittner didn’t account for was the possibility of unethical or corrupt cops.
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Marijuana legalization — a step toward social justice

Mexican cartels, known for their gruesome violence such as mass beheadings and melting enemies in vats of acid, have been particularly hard hit as consumers move to legal markets and many farmers have given up illegal production of marijuana altogether. According to a Healthy Kids survey conducted during the first year of legalization, high school students in Colorado both used marijuana at lower rates than in previous years and at rates lower than the country as a whole. [...] legalizing mari
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Another Marijuana Raid in San Diego; Cop Wears 'F*** The Growers' T-Shirt

Another Marijuana Raid in San Diego; Cop Wears 'F*** The Growers' T-Shirt | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
There is no shortage of headlines in the news these days about police officers abusing their power and denying citizens...
Rob Duke's insight:

Cops like to be independent, but someone has to supervise so this kind of dumb mistake and arrogant mindset don't become so entrenched that a cop can wear this blatantly arrogant shirt.  The other issue here is to what extent do public servants get away with saying one of two things, both of which sit on the "slippery slope": 1. It's just my job to enforce the law, not decide if the law is right; or 2. I don't agree with that law, so I'm going to enforce something else.  One of these allows Jim Crow laws, for instance, to exist when public administrators don't question the morality of the laws they enforce; and, the other means that public administrators are aggrandizing themselves above the people, above the legislature, and above the "rule of law".  We need a theory and method for dealing with this paradox.

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Evidence supports officer’s account of shooting in Ferguson

Michael Brown and Darren Wilson fought for the officer’s gun, interviews and the autopsy indicate.
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Federal Forfeiture Program: What's It Funding?

Since 2008, 5,400 police departments and task forces have spent $2.5 billion in federally forfeited property. Yet the taken property overwhelmingly came from people who have done nothing wrong.
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 26, 3:33 AM
This article really makes it seem like the police departments are living large off the federal forfeiture program. The program should already have an auditor in place in the departments to oversee where the funding is going. I do think that some should really go to community based programs perhaps to help kids potentially at risk. However with all the horrible things that have been going on in todays society police officers also need to go into things protected. We cant expect cops in Americas biggest cities to carry just a big mag lite and hope they can take down the bad guys. Sometimes extra equipment is needed in certain scenarios. If these programs are so successful in putting so much money in police departments than why are so many officers getting laid off, while others have to pull double shifts to get by? I dont think the senators that are dipping into this are also doing it for the better good, I can see them still enforcing the forfeiture laws and instead of police getting a say, they will make sure it goes straight to just federal pockets and then no one can audit where that money has really been spent. It is a high percentage of cases where the ones who had property seized were never charged with a crime, this does seem kind of unfair. At the same time though cases can be drawn out for years, so you cant just wait until the end of a case to say if that money will be returned as well, thats too much red tape. There needs to be oversight in this law, but not just oversight of another party wanting to take the funding for just another agenda.
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Judge tosses lawsuit by Seattle police officers

Judge tosses lawsuit by Seattle police officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A federal judge has thrown out a lawsuit brought by more than 100 Seattle police officers who said new guidelines on using force jeopardized their safety.
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 26, 4:04 AM
Seems in this case the Seattle police department had already been investigated for excessive use of force and because of this as part of a settlement agreement they had to come up with a policy to show they are making a change to make sure these cases don't happen. The police were upset because the lawyer in charge with the policy did not consult with them. I don't think they really had a choice. Hopefully because of this new policy police are not negatively affected. However at the same time, those who did abuse is will have to think twice before they take certain actions. It also now seems that because they brought this case up that the attorneys wants to do a further review of that department, not making it any easier.
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Captured Pennsylvania Ambush Suspect Eric Frein Charged With Murder - NBC News

Captured Pennsylvania Ambush Suspect Eric Frein Charged With Murder - NBC News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
It came down to a surprise stroke of luck. After scouring the Pocono Mountains for seven weeks for a cop-killing suspect who became more a phantom with each ...
Rob Duke's insight:

Arrested and handcuffed with the dead trooper's cuffs--the law is immortal!

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California Proposition 47, Reduced Penalties for Some Crimes Initiative (2014) - Ballotpedia

California Proposition 47, Reduced Penalties for Some Crimes Initiative (2014) - Ballotpedia | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Ballotpedia is a nonprofit, nonpartisan collaborative encyclopedia designed to connect people to politics and elections at the local, state and federal level.
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Joking aside

Joking aside | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
MANY of us have felt that almost irresistible urge to make a sarcastic quip to a security official while trying to board a plane—and then quickly thought...
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Brandon Jensen's comment, October 31, 1:20 AM
sometimes ideas are not as funny as you thought they were at the time. I am not sure what this person was expecting to happen, but I am pretty sure they won't (?) be doing it again!
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FBI created fake Seattle Times Web page to nab bomb-threat suspect

The FBI created a fake news story on a bogus Seattle Times Web page to plant software in the computer of a suspect in a series of bomb threats to Timberline High School in 2007, documents reveal.
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Rob Duke's comment, October 30, 5:07 PM
Clay: yes, and this comes in the same office where DOJ says that Seattle P.D. needs to be under Fed oversight. It's ironic....
Brittany Stahle's comment, October 31, 12:05 AM
I think this should have been confidential, so how did this man Christopher attain this information and then post it on twitter. That was the FBI's mistake and also not letting the Seattle Times know what was going on but I think that the FBI was doing what they were suppose to, to apprehend a suspect that was making several bomb threats. What if the FBI never stepped in and the juvenile would have gone through with it, what would people say then? I don't see the big deal besides it not being confidential.
Brandon Jensen's comment, October 31, 12:59 AM
I think in this scenario the FBI took steps to protect potential victims to this person who was making bomb threats and in the end, they got him, so I do not see it as big of a deal as some others. However, I can also see the other arguing side, but I still stand by my opinion of it not being that big of a deal.
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The Key to Change Is Middle Management

The Key to Change Is Middle Management | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Research shows the traits that make them successful.
Rob Duke's insight:

Sergeants and Corporals.  If you win their hearts and minds, then you can change your organization.

Like with countries, you don't so much as change law (policy) as enforce it; and, interpret it for unusual situations.  The dialectic of generations' worth of norm building has already determined what laws (policies) will be accepted as legitimate.  If you want to change your organization, you must change hearts and minds and your middle managers are the ones who can help you or hinder you most.

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Man armed with pickaxe arrested at Fairbanks Sears store

Man armed with pickaxe arrested at Fairbanks Sears store | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — A man brandishing a pickaxe inside the Sears store on Airport Way was arrested by Fairbanks police around 5 p.m. on Sunday.
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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, October 29, 10:34 PM

It sounds like the suspect wanted to get caught. Who goes in to rob a place and walks up to the clerk to tell her what he is going to do and that she should call the police? That's weird. It wasn't even a half hour later that he was in custody. I'm speechless with this one. 

Alexander Yakovlev's comment, October 30, 12:15 AM
Speaking of discretion, while I was reading an article I was thinking “did police do the right thing?” the guy just said he will rob the bank but he didn’t actually do anything. He probably deserves couple days of jail for scaring salesperson, but I am not sure if you can actually charge him with anything. So, did police make a good judgment call? I am hoping they did, otherwise why should we keep officers that we don’t trust.
Rachael Toy's comment, October 30, 1:46 AM
First of all this is just a really weird story. I assumed that when you rob a store you don’t for warn them to call the police as you do it. I am glad that nobody got hurt though. Sometimes these types of stories don’t seem real until they show up in your local newspaper; there are crazy people out there. It makes me wonder what I would do if I had been shopping in the store at that time, especially if my children were with me. This is another one of those stories that could have gone in the complete opposite direction and been a huge disaster. Situations like this are good examples for why carrying guns should be allowed. No one expected this to happen and if he had been a bigger threat or the police weren’t able to get there in a matter of minutes; many people could have been hurt or killed.
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A guide to skiving

A guide to skiving | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
THE best way to understand a system is to look at it from the point of view of people who want to subvert it. Sensible bosses try to view their companies through the...
Rob Duke's insight:

Tips for aspiring managers...

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Mamie Davis's comment, October 30, 2:47 AM
I think it is totally appropriate for companies to monitor their employee’s computers and browsing history. They are paying employees to come in and do a job, and they have every right to know if their money is being put to good use or wasted on frivolous internet ventures. On the other hand, I don’t think employers should block sites they deem “unproductive” from their employees browsing abilities. We aren’t children, and shouldn’t be treated as such. Employees should be given autonomy and a choice on whether to skiv or work, likewise the company should be able to monitor such things and have to choice to keep or fire a skiver.
Clay Faris's comment, October 31, 9:07 AM
I'll agree with Mamie here. Employers should have the right to monitor if they choose to, but not to take any action about it unless the browsing is affecting the bottom line or work isn't getting done. That said, I'm not interested in working in any place that thinks that little of me & my integrity. In a perfect world a person would behave morally and not take advantage of the system because they can. Work hard, get it done, if there is time left over then have at it.
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CHP chief: Controversy over photo sharing isolated

CHP chief: Controversy over photo sharing isolated | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Investigators say Officer Sean Harrington confessed to sending the photos to colleagues as a game.
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Implementation of police state delayed… again… now scheduled for summer 2015

Implementation of police state delayed… again… now scheduled for summer 2015 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Sources close to the conspiracy to turn the US into a police state controlled by an emperor report that plans have been delayed, again.
Rob Duke's insight:

Um? This satire might not be all that helpful...

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Clay Faris's comment, October 31, 9:26 AM
Nah Rob, it's funny! And sad at the same time. Nice to see that nobody takes the threat of a police state seriously. "When they came for the teachers I remained silent because I was not a teacher......" That's not the exact quote by Niemoller, I substituted "teachers" in for "socialists/Jews", but you get the gist. People are blind, willfully most times, and never think something can happen until it does.
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GAME OVER? Official Autopsy Suggests Michael Brown Was Not Surrendering, Attempted to Take Officer's Gun - Bearing Arms

GAME OVER? Official Autopsy Suggests Michael Brown Was Not Surrendering, Attempted to Take Officer's Gun - Bearing Arms | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
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Forensic expert urges caution on Michael Brown autopsy analysis

Forensic expert urges caution on Michael Brown autopsy analysis | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An official autopsy report on Michael Brown may bolster his killer's story. But a forensics expert who reviewed the report warns against jumping to conclusions.
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Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps

Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

"Spatial analysis has always been a hallmark of GIS, the 'numerical recipes' which set GIS apart from other forms of computerized visualization and information management. With GIS we pose questions and derive results using a wide array of analytical tools to help us understand and compare places, determine how places are related, find the best locations and paths, detect and quantify patterns, and even to make spatial predictions."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 7:50 PM

GIS is a key tool in spatial analysis, but it can also be a driving force in using math, science, technology and (yes) geography as interdisciplinary ways of teaching the curriculum.  StoryMaps can be rich with images and videos, but also filled with data at a variety of scales.  What stories can you tell in this rich, visual format?  What visual template shown might lend itself best for that sort of project? 


Tagsmapping, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 29, 12:16 PM

 Not only Spatial, even plain geography is very interesting and important,  but.....not everybody understands, and want to...