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Chicago police stop immediate responses to burglaries and thefts ...

Chicago police stop immediate responses to burglaries and thefts ... | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Many Chicagoans who call 911 will no longer receive immediate help. Chicago police will no longer show up at crime scenes unless someone is in critical condition or a criminal suspect remains on the scene.
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Mandy Burris's comment, February 7, 2013 4:28 AM
This is not so surprising to me. If it is not a life or death emergency or if the suspect is not still on scene or leaving the scene while you are on 911 then immediate law enforcement response is not necessary. Do I think that police should not respond? No, I think they should still respond, but do I feel this is a run code all the way there to take pictures, possibly document other types of evidence and call the crime tech to finish? No. I realize this is possibly the worst moment in your life right now, and I sympathize with you losing personal items that will be difficult to replace, but when there is the possibility of someone being shot (which in Chicago is highly likely) while I am taking pictures of the door not broken and the TV carefully removed and the only thing out of the expensive things in the house missing I'll take the policing to save lives.

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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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The Supreme Court Reviews a Case of Blatant Racism by Georgia Prosecutors

The Supreme Court Reviews a Case of Blatant Racism by Georgia Prosecutors | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The prosecutors seeking to send Timothy Tyrone Foster to death row went about their job in a curious manner. During jury selection, they highlighted each black prospective juror’s name in green—on four different copies of the jury list—and wrote that the green highlighting “represents blacks.” On each black juror’s questionnaire,...

Via Concerned Citizen
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The Psychology of Organizational Change | Quality Digest

The Psychology of Organizational Change | Quality Digest | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Most change models incorporate the following six aspects:
1. Creating the urgency for change
2. Creating a compelling case for change
3. Creating and communicating the vision for change
4. Removing obstacles
5. Creating short-term wins
6. Making change a part of the corporate culture
Rob Duke's insight:

Organizational Design (O.D.) is code for organization change.

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New NAACP report urges Congress to pass legislation that would end racial profiling

"It is our goal to help end race-based discrimination, rooted in this nation’s history of slavery and Jim Crow laws," the report says.
Rob Duke's insight:

Prof. May and I wrote an article last year published in Duke University's Alaska Law Journal.  As long as case law allows pre-text stops under Wren vs. U.S. (1996), this will either continue or, at least, folks will suspect it's going on.  In our article, we suggest a three-prong test for whether a pre-text stop is allowed:

http://scholarship.law.duke.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1364&context=alr

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Police tactics when dealing with the possible: "Suicide by Cop".

Police tactics when dealing with the possible: "Suicide by Cop". | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Lyons contacted the police non-emergency dispatcher on May 11 after catching Way drinking and lying on their bed holding a large knife. She said Way, a recovering alcoholic, “had a setback” after losing his job but did not threaten her with it.

“The only person Justin threatened was himself and I honestly don’t think he wanted to die,” she said, adding that the two St. Johns County sheriff’s deputies who responded to her call, 32-year-old Kyle Braig and 26-year-old Jonas Carballosa, who were carrying assault rifles, looked like they “were going into war” when they entered the residence.

Rob Duke's insight:

It's an interesting problem.  I came across this many times in my career, and was fortunate to always be able to talk these people down or have some tactical advantage over them.  Once my partner, Tony, and I had a similar situation and I, frankly, don't know how it would have gone had not Officer Tony crossed the room quickly and snatched the knife out of the women's hand as if she were merely a naughty child.  As I recall, he caught some heat for being John Wayne, but we didn't yet have Tasers, so had he not reacted, we might have been forced to shoot her.  A few weeks later, another partner did just that with a domestic violence suspect who turned towards him and racked a 12 gauge shotgun.  Two officers shot him only to find out that he was holding an empty gun.

I had just been in a shooting myself and one of these officers and I came back to work 72 hours later following our mandatory after-shooting legal and psychological screening.  Our first call back was a woman holding her ex at gun point threatening murder/suicide.  We responded and talked her out of the plan, took the gun, and escorted to a local mental ward.

This all happened within a month at one police department in the Los Angeles metro area.

So, how do we evaluate these incidents?

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Cleveland police union says Justice Department reforms would endanger police

Cleveland police union says Justice Department reforms would endanger police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The head of Cleveland's patrol union said aspects of the agreement that mandates sweeping reforms to the city's police department could put officers in danger.
Rob Duke's insight:

Possibly, but more likely is that officers will draw guns, but hold them behind a leg, etc. and then not do the report.

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Shoot or don't shoot? Sheriff wants media to make call

Shoot or don't shoot? Sheriff wants media to make call | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Pennington County Sheriff wants to put journalists and community leaders through training.
Rob Duke's insight:

In class, I show the shoot/don't shoot video.  It's not as good as the actual interactive software, but it gives a good idea.  I'll try to upload it for the online class.

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Study: Judges Are Far Less Biased Than Law School Students

Study: Judges Are Far Less Biased Than Law School Students | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

A new study says judges, at least ones sitting on state benches,  are more objective than they get credit for. The report, forthcoming in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, says judges by and large are able to exercise professional judgement and reach consensus on disputes that polarize the general public.

 

The study, which took more than two years to conduct, included about 1,500 subjects: 253 judges, 225 lawyers, 250 law students (from five schools including Harvard and Yale), and 800 adults members of the general public.


Via Thomas Schmeling
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Nettie Larson's comment, Today, 2:22 AM
It is definitely encouraging that judges seem to be considerately less biased than a comparable group of the public. Sometimes I worry that judges have too much unchecked power, and that this can be dangerous if a judge allows their opinions to cloud their decisions. Court decisions can have ramifications for years afterwards, and it is definitely best if judges are able to remain as impartial as possible. I was also surprised that lawyers are less biased than law students, I would have thought that the biasedness would be similar.
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Why the Supreme Court beard case matters

Why the Supreme Court beard case matters | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Dawinder S. Sidhu from the University of New Mexico Law School looks at a case about beards in prison that could have broader implications about religious freedom.


Via Thomas Schmeling
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U.S. Supreme Court: GPS Trackers Are a Form of Search and Seizure

U.S. Supreme Court: GPS Trackers Are a Form of Search and Seizure | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

When the government places a location monitor on you or your stuff, it could be violating the Fourth Amendment.


Via Thomas Schmeling
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And the law won

And the law won | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
IN DECEMBER 2005 Asia Weekly, a Chinese-language magazine in Hong Kong, put 14 Chinese civil-rights advocates on its cover. It hailed them and their brethren in the...
Rob Duke's insight:

China's trying, but still got a long way to go....

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The Horrifically Racist Photo That Led to the Firing of a Chicago Cop | VICE | United States

The Horrifically Racist Photo That Led to the Firing of a Chicago Cop | VICE | United States | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Chicago Police Officer Timothy McDermott was fired last year for misconduct, and an old photo where he and another officer are holding rifles over a black man wearing antlers explains why.
Rob Duke's insight:

Truly terrible that this was done by a couple of cops....

Until we root out these officers, the business will never be respected.

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Montana Lee Nolan's comment, Today, 3:25 PM
After reading the article I scrolled down and read the comments posted by other readers across the internet (not classmates). The majority of the comments talk about whether or not the black man on the ground with the antlers was in on the picture or not, arguing that he isn’t hog tied and he is purposely sticking his tongue out to be silly. In all honesty, the picture is just horrible. I don’t understand how anyone could constitute this as being okay because of a joke. A police officer is supposed to be a reliable individual that the community trusts to protect and serve them. Joke or not, this photo does not show reliability or trust. McDermott, the officer in question, made the poor decision to be a part of this photo. Even if it was a joke his participation does not reflect well on the Chicago Police Department, and because of that I think the department was just in firing him. The article states that the photo was taken after McDermott was hired as an officer, and that McDermott doesn’t really remember the photo but at the time he was just trying to fit in and get along with other officers. The article also states that the status of the man on the ground is unknown (whether or not he was under arrest). Either way this photo could be viewed as if the officers were making an arrest in a horribly unjust manner – and since the identity of the man on the ground is unknown, how could the department simply trust the word of McDermott? In the end however, it’s all about public perception. The public saw this photo of an officer mistreating an arrestee (assumedly) and because of that public perception and trust in police was negatively affected.
Montana Lee Nolan's curator insight, Today, 3:29 PM

After reading the article I scrolled down and read the comments posted by other readers across the internet (not classmates).  The majority of the comments talk about whether or not the black man on the ground with the antlers was in on the picture or not, arguing that he isn’t hog tied and he is purposely sticking his tongue out to be silly.  In all honesty, the picture is just horrible. I don’t understand how anyone could constitute this as being okay because of a joke.  A police officer is supposed to be a reliable individual that the community trusts to protect and serve them.  Joke or not, this photo does not show reliability or trust.  McDermott, the officer in question, made the poor decision to be a part of this photo.  Even if it was a joke his participation does not reflect well on the Chicago Police Department, and because of that I think the department was just in firing him.  The article states that the photo was taken after McDermott was hired as an officer, and that McDermott doesn’t really remember the photo but at the time he was just trying to fit in and get along with other officers.  The article also states that the status of the man on the ground is unknown (whether or not he was under arrest).  Either way this photo could be viewed as if the officers were making an arrest in a horribly unjust manner – and since the identity of the man on the ground is unknown, how could the department simply trust the word of McDermott?  In the end however, it’s all about public perception.  The public saw this photo of an officer mistreating an arrestee (assumedly) and because of that public perception and trust in police was negatively affected.  

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What's It Like to Be a Death Row Executioner in America? | VICE | United States

What's It Like to Be a Death Row Executioner in America? | VICE | United States | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The precise methods prisons use to kill prisoners are often shrouded in secrecy, but we do know that the teams in charge of executions are rarely made up of experts.
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Police seize possessions of rough sleepers in crackdown on homelessness

Police seize possessions of rough sleepers in crackdown on homelessness | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police in north London have seized blankets, sleeping bags and food donations from rough sleepers in a crackdown on homelessness.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Nettie Larson's comment, May 28, 8:09 PM
While homelessness is a problem to be solved, it should be solved for those that are homeless, not for those that dislike looking at homeless people in public areas. I think that sometimes people start seeing homeless people as less than human, which definitely shouldn't be the case. While the police were acting on complaints from some citizens, the police have a duty to serve all of the community, and the homeless are some of the neediest members of the community.
Rob Duke's comment, Today, 4:45 AM
Nettie, Yes, and this is a good example of the Paradox of Proximity. Cops are too close (rightly so) to victims, but also to the elected officials and those who influence the elected. As a result, we (I'm retired, but still use the "royal" we) tend to enforce the desires of those who most closely direct us and who control the resources we crave. So, when Anonymous claims that we're lap dogs, there's some truth to this. Instead, I'd advocate a policy where we encourage those with whom we interact to come to Council/Burrough/Board of Supervisor meetings and engage their elected officials on matters that interest them. At least everyone gets a say and we don't then appear to be playing favorites on the one hand, nor insubordinate on the other.
Rob Duke's comment, Today, 4:47 AM
p.s. You'll soon be reading William Ker Muir's (aka "Sandy Muir") work about the police officer as street corner politician. Sandy identified nearly a dozen Paradoxes of Power and I have humbly added a few more. Unfortunately, we lost "Sandy", professor emeritus at Berkeley, in February. It's a real loss to our profession that he died so young.
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Judge Andrew Napolitano: Mass Surveillance Will Continue Even Without PATRIOT Act Section 215 - ChrisInMaryville's Blog

Judge Andrew Napolitano: Mass Surveillance Will Continue Even Without PATRIOT Act Section 215 - ChrisInMaryville's Blog | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
As with the PATRIOT Act 14 years ago, national security state special interests will control the tinkering behind the scenes, and the American people will learn what was wrought only after the bill passes.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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Pregnant woman in shocking arrest video speaks out -

The pregnant woman at the center of a shocking arrest video details her side of the story. CNN's Kyung Lah reports.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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I'm a black ex-cop, and this is the real truth about race and policing

5 things I wish people understood about bias in American police departments.
Rob Duke's insight:

I can't speak for St. Louis, which is where this officer worked, but it wasn't like this on the West Coast.  In that environment, there were 80 percent of the cops that would mostly follow the policies and laws and only violate them when they thought someone was getting a raw deal.  10 percent would never violate any rules; and 10 percent or less who felt they were above the law.  That was my experience.

I saw cops mostly narc off other cops.  I never saw any corruption on the beat (taking a free cup of coffee is the exception).  As a Chief for 16 years, I fired cops for lying, abuse, and once for theft; but in 16 years, I only had to do this fewer than a dozen times.  For the most part, I think the business was pretty clean; and my biggest problems were cops that were too zealous and didn't realize that soft power was better than hard power (legal hard power).  What I mean is they saw every problem as being solved through arrest.

In traffic enforcement we say: "Use the three-E's".  First, you look at the Engineering to see if the road design or signage can be improved.  Second, try to Educate people about the elevated danger from this part of the roadway.  Lastly, if the first two didn't work, you resort to Enforcement.  Good traffic cops follow these steps and we'd like all cops to follow something of this sort to solve crime and dispute problems.  My problems were with cops who thought this was improper or "not their job".  They'd say: "I'm not a babysitter".  So, for me and in my career, I didn't see corruption, abuse, or crime, but I did see less than optimal policing--from a small percentage of officers.

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Oologah officer injured in shooting during pursuit

Oologah officer injured in shooting during pursuit | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Quick Facts: Officer shot during pursuit of suspects north of Nowata Officer was transported to the hospital in serious condition Pursuit continued across Kansas line where 2 suspects were taken into custody Assault rifles, body armor were found in the suspects’ vehicle One male fled on foot An Oologah police officer was injured in a shooting north of Nowata.
Rob Duke's insight:

I throw these in just to remind us that, though we are right to question police power, they are truly the only ones on the domestic front who say: "Vereor Non Magnus Nocens Lupus": "I fear no big bad wolf".

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The Most Stressful Job of 2015 Goes to...

The Most Stressful Job of 2015 Goes to... | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A new list of the most stressful and least stressful jobs by Career Cast was released this week.
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What Is Management Research Actually Good For?

What Is Management Research Actually Good For? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
And how big data is making that a harder question to answer.
Rob Duke's insight:

We do comparatively little of this in justice--should we do more?

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Constitution Check: Do the Supreme Court and other federal courts need a watchdog?

Constitution Check: Do the Supreme Court and other federal courts need a watchdog? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Lyle Denniston, the National Constitution Center’s constitutional literacy adviser, looks at an effort by Senator Charles Grassley to create an inspector general to monitor the Supreme Court and ot...

Via Thomas Schmeling
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California: Court Bars DNA Collection in Arrests

The First District Court of Appeal on Wednesday struck down a state law that requires the collection of DNA from anyone arrested on suspicion of committing a felony.

Via Thomas Schmeling
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Supreme Court to decide constitutionality of lethal injection drugs

Supreme Court to decide constitutionality of lethal injection drugs | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Next week, the Supreme Court is set to wade into debate over the constitutionality of certain drugs used for execution by lethal injection, as Glossip v. Gross comes before the bench.

Via Thomas Schmeling
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Thailand Police Detains Student Protesters During Coup Anniversary · Global Voices

Thailand Police Detains Student Protesters During Coup Anniversary · Global Voices | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"We cannot build a democratic society if we lack freedom, liberty, rights, justice, and reconciliation."
Rob Duke's insight:

Different standards for different cultures....

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Miami Springs PD Sgt. Busted on Corruption Charge

Miami Springs PD Sgt. Busted on Corruption Charge | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Miami Springs Police officer is facing a corruption charge following an FBI investigation, officials said.
Sgt. Andres Quintanilla was arrested and charged Tuesday with attempting to affect commerce by extortion under color of official right, according to the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida.
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Wanted: 8 good hearted executioners

Wanted: 8 good hearted executioners | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Rob Duke's insight:

If you're a self-motivated person with good upper body strength, this may be the job for you: Saudi Arabia needs 8 executioners.  Good pay.  Good benefits.  Uniforms provided.  Opportunity to travel.  Meet interesting people...and chop their heads off.

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