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Marijuana Legalization – Answering Questions and Developing a Framework

Marijuana Legalization – Answering Questions and Developing a Framework | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Bringing together Liberals in British Columbia (RT @KyleHarrietha: Comprehensive: "Liberal Party of Canada (BC) releases draft policy paper on legalization of #marijuana - http://t.co/ypTCulYN | LPCBC"...
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police, even with search warrants

Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police, even with search warrants | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
New operating system makes it impossible for company to comply with requests for data on devices.
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Clay Faris's comment, Today, 4:05 PM
In a move sure to be heralded by opponents of big government and criticized by proponents of the same Apple has (again) distinguished itself from its competitors. Personally, as a citizen I LOVE this idea. It makes me feel more secure knowing Big Brother isn't (and can't even if He wants to) looking over my shoulder. As a police officer I hope people engaged in criminal enterprise either don't use iPhones or forget to turn off the iCloud stream. Your point of view on this one depends entirely upon where you're standing. One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter, right?
Clay Faris's comment, Today, 4:06 PM
I'm pretty much a fan of anything that gives the federal government the middle finger though......
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It's Time for the U.S. to Ban Spanking

It's Time for the U.S. to Ban Spanking | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Studies show that spanking is harmful — and it doesn't work
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Tonya Metteer Howell's comment, Today, 2:57 AM
I was spanked as a child as well as physically abused. The difference was in the motivation and attitude toward me and toward the approach by the person doling out the punishment. As a disciplinary act out of honest intentions and not anger, I believe that spanking can be an acceptable form of punishment for some children. It is not necessarily better than or more right than other forms, but every situation and circumstance is individual and should be assessed as such when contemplating disciplinary actions. Punishment can be exacted in many ways and I believe spanking is simply one form. That is not to say that what works for one person will and does work for all. Responsible parents need to account for the status and unique situational factors for every disciplinary circumstance. There is a vast difference between someone becoming enraged and striking a child out of anger, then calling it spanking. It is very damaging and detrimental to the parent-child bond as well as the child's future behavior patterns and attitudes; however, if a spanking is used appropriately by a loving parent and is not out of control emotionally or psychologically, I feel it can be a useful tool. I do not think generalizing all parents and children to evaluate a disciplinary approach is appropriate or valid. There are too many extenuating circumstances and factors to take into consideration and oppression is never a successful action. Other approaches toward protecting children from abuse are successful and beneficial and less extreme than making a law that restricts parental rights.
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, Today, 4:01 AM
I agree with the article however I do think that sometimes physical involvement is necessary in raising a child. I am not talking about spanking or hitting a child, time out works just fine. In my opinion, if the child is out of hands then we need spank his/her parents, but not the child. Parents are the ones who doesn’t do their job well, and it’s not child’s fault that he didn’t know how to behave appropriately in certain situation.
Heather Wiinikka's comment, Today, 1:24 PM
I do not believe in having to spank your child. If your child is raised right with discipline, guidance, structure, routine, morals, and rules then they should know right from wrong. You know all parents tell their kids don't hit others but then parents turn around and hit/spank their kids which gives kids a mixed signal. I think a time out, maybe taking away there favorite toy for a while, grounded, or anything else but kids do not need to be spanked. I was spanked as a child and i told myself growing up i will never spank my kids and i have 4 kids and have never spanked them my other methods of discipline work just fine.
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Daniele Watts, actress claiming she was wrongfully detained for PDA, seen straddling boyfriend in car in new photos 

Daniele Watts, actress claiming she was wrongfully detained for PDA, seen straddling boyfriend in car in new photos  | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Daniele Watts said she was doing "nothing wrong" before being accosted by police and placed in handcuffs on Sept. 11.
Rob Duke's insight:

See my earlier post about people lying about their contacts with the police...happens more often than we'd like to admit.  They often have fooled themselves or have blurred the lines of definition: "I did not have sex with that woman"

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Tonya Metteer Howell's comment, Today, 3:14 AM
“A picture is worth a thousand words!” Professor, I absolutely agree with your implied assertion that justification of any act is possible when lines of definition are blurred. This behavior in a public place absolutely deserved attention and I commend the citizens and police who participated in mitigating the scene for their fairness and courtesy. As a mother of three, I would have no problem reporting such behavior as lewd and inappropriate. In fact, if it is true that her breasts were exposed at some point, I would definitely want to press public indecency charges. There is no reason for two adults to behave that way in a public venue and trying to argue semantics and/or flat out lie about it simply depicts an immaturity and indecency not deserving of publicity or fame. If I had watched this woman’s television show before, I certainly would not now. Furthermore, her pathetic attempt at citing racial inequality is disgusting and embarrassing for other African Americans. She is not a good role model and not a true representation of a strong African American woman. No matter what color her skin pigment, her behavior deserves punitive action."
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Comcast Denies It Will Cut Off Customers Who Use Tor, The Web Browser For Criminals

Comcast Denies It Will Cut Off Customers Who Use Tor, The Web Browser For Criminals | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Some users of the anonymous web browser Tor have reported that Comcast has threatened to cut off their internet service unless they stop using the legal software. 

Comcast completely denies their claims. In a blog post, the company said "We have no policy against Tor, or any other browser or software. Customers are free to use their Xfinity Internet service to visit any website, use any app, and so forth."

According to a report on Deepdotweb, Comcast customer representatives have branded Tor "illegal" and told customers that using it is against the company's policies.

 

MORE:  http://finance.yahoo.com/news/comcast-threatening-cut-off-customers-092817979.html


Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Rob Duke's insight:

The Dark Web, Pirate Bay, Tor, and other new technologies; combined with alternative currencies (e.g. Bitcoin) mean that the police must think about strategy, tactics, logistics and even the philosophy of law so that we are prepared to fight crime when it moves elsewhere in the institutional framework....

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Clay Faris's comment, Today, 3:38 PM
Rob do you believe the police (or any leo agency for that matter) will ever really be able to keep up with the onion folks? The very nature of the deep web prevents snooping or spying (unless the website owner/manager is a moron and posts the info in a Tweet like the genius who used to operate The Silk Road did). And say what you want about the legitimacy or legality of the deep web, what it represents (besides the bad things) is real, true free market. Maybe the last one on the planet. How do you apply for a search warrant to search for the unsearchable? I'm not suggesting we don't try......there are things lurking in the darkness of the deep web that should make us all disgusted and afraid (child porn), and there are monsters that live there who ought never see the light of day. I just don't know that the police are up to the challenge of cracking that particular nut. The traditional emphasis on squeaky clean backgrounds for police applicants means that we're negating a large pool of people with the exact skillset we need to be utilizing. Curious your thoughts on that.
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Open-Minded Listening by Jonathan R. Cohen :: SSRN

Open-Minded Listening by Jonathan R. Cohen :: SSRN | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Parties in conflict do not typically listen to one another well. On a physical level they hear what their counterparts say, but on a deeper level they do not t
Rob Duke's insight:

The Fresno Pacific, PeaceMaking Model, developed by Ron and Roxanne Claassen (and others), suggests having parties summarize what the other party has said and to keep doing so until the other party agrees that that is indeed what they said/meant.

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'Django Unchained' Actress Explains Why She Refused To Give LAPD Her ID

As previously reported, last week two Studio City police officers in Los Angeles detained and allegedly mistook "Django Unchained" star Daniele Watts for a prostitute after they saw her -- reportedly fully clothed -- kissing boyfriend and c...
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a good one to help explain the readings a little better:

 

More comes out on this story:

 

Actress' perspective: American's (and cops) still can't accept an inter-racial relationship.

Cops: someone called to say a prostitution transaction is occurring in a car (in that area, that sounds consistent).  Now I see a skinny black chick kissing some white "john" in a car.  Maybe, maybe not, let's see....

 

Actress perspective: I'm being harassed and I don't feel like cooperating.

Cop perspective: look, someone called me.  If you just give me your I.D., I can log this and we can all get on with our lives.

 

Actress perspective: someone has to take a stand.

Cop perspective: woah! innocent people don't act like this, maybe this person is involved in something (plus, don't screw with the po-po because I can make things uncomfortable and I will so you won't develop a habit of this).

 

Like Dennis Miller used to say: That's my perspective, but I could be wrong....

 

There's never enough hours in the day, but a little neighborhood garden tending might be in order.  Hold some meetings, bring a little food, gets people there so they can meet the neighbors.  That builds cop/citizen relationships and gets people talking with one another.  That reduces feelings of "they just don't like us" and "we don't like 'those people' here".

 

This is the idea of soft power at work (velvet glove).  It has to be done early and often (like caring for a garden); then like a battery it builds up your power (and legitimacy) for times when you have no choice but to use your hard power (iron fist).

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San Bernardino man in standoff captured after shooting at kids, cops

San Bernardino man in standoff captured after shooting at kids, cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
SAN BERNARDINO >> A man shot at a group of people surrounding an ice cream truck on Sunday afternoon and then retreated into his home, prompting evacuations and a response from the Police Department’s SWAT team.He shot at officers
Rob Duke's insight:

...shooting at kids and the ice cream truck!

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Brittany Stahle's comment, September 15, 8:16 PM
According to the article they have had issues with this man before several times concerning his dog and the neighbors. It would be scary knowing one of your neighbors were dangerous where they act out with force as he did. Having this incident where children were put into harm would be terrifying and this man should be charged. I could not imagine just walking out of my house to get ice cream from the ice cream truck and all of a sudden I am being shot at. I am very glad no one was injured and everyone made it out okay.
Sarah O'Leary's comment, Today, 1:01 AM
Wow, this is definitely a headline that could have easily been another tragedy. It sounds like with all the issues this person was having were mental or social disorders and he obviously needed some help or at the very least shouldn't have had weapons at his disposal.
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How the Criminal Justice System Impacts Well-Being - Collateral Consequences - YouTube

To watch the full discussion or to learn more about the Well-Being Initiative, visit www.wellbeinginitiative.org In this clip from the Charles Koch Institute...

Via Concerned Citizen, up2-21
Rob Duke's insight:

See Therapeutic Jurisprudence as a theory base.

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Homeland Security Today: New York City Adopts RFID Tags to Track First Responders

Homeland Security Today: New York City Adopts RFID Tags to Track First Responders | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Homeland Security Today is the leading source for independent news and analysis on homeland security affairs
Rob Duke's insight:

Can these be hacked?

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Ricky Osborne's comment, September 15, 2:26 AM
These RFID tags that will be attached to first responders is a great idea. The tragic event of September 11, 2001 showed that a new system needed to be in placed in order to ensure the safety of first responders. Many lost their lives trying the save others from the devastation of that days events. These RFID chips will aid in that quest as each first responders location will be tracked through a computer system. If they themselves are need of aid, they will be able to be tracked and their location found in an effective manner. The implementation of this new technology show that “the rules of the game” can change for the better.
Shelly DeWilde's comment, September 15, 3:20 AM
I don't believe that the RFID trackers can be hacked because it has a base that sends out a specific code to the tags within a certain perimeter, I think of my bluetooth stereos however the base has discretion on who it lets in. I think that this idea is great in fast paced dangerous jobs that require that everyone be accounted for. I hear that they want to use this technology on the people in grade schools like staff and students, I think that idea will create a lot of debate.
Rob Duke's comment, September 15, 3:22 AM
Thanks for the additional info...
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Albuquerque Police Chief Says Dept is “Stuck” with Officers Who “Shouldn’t be on the Force.”

In a shockingly honest and refreshing interview with USA Today, Albuquerque Police Chief Eden stated, "I believe there are people on the force who shouldn't be on the force,'' and admitted that they may be stuck with those dangerous officers; thanks to police unions making discipline for past actions extremely difficult. Since 2009, the Albuquerque…

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Rob Duke's insight:

Oof, that's gonna be a great quote when they get sued for "failure to supervise"....

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Clay Faris's comment, Today, 3:46 PM
I don't envy the position of the APD chief one bit. This department has a long history of trouble within its ranks. That said, it seems more that a little disingenuous of the Chief to blame the union for preventing discipline over past actions. Wouldn't that course of action amount to an "ex post facto" (after the fact) punishment? If something wasn't wrong when the officers engaged in it, then retroactively punishing them for it could open the department up for an entire world of due process lawsuits. They need to play the hand they've been dealt moving forward and begin the process of weeding out the bad apples.
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Calling the shots

Calling the shots | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
IF A gun fires and nobody reports it, does it make a sound? Some police forces are finding out. On September 3rd the Urban Institute, a think-tank, produced a report...
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Rob Duke's comment, September 15, 3:51 AM
Salinas P.D. had a real problem with gun shots over New Years and one year had an innocent person hit. After putting this system in and advertising the heck out of it, they substantially cut down on random firing into the air activity. I don't know if they still have it in operation.
Rob Duke's comment, September 15, 1:44 PM
There's also been a little work in Afghanistan that uses a Bayes statistic model to track insurgent activity and then predict that more activity will likely occur (like ripples from a pool). What they seem to be finding is that the increased activity can be contained with increased patrols and the hearts-and-minds work that goes hand in hand with nation building. I found the same tactics worked in policing high gang/crime areas. If intel suggested that a dispute was brewing, police action could often cool things long enough to turn potential homicides into less serious reprisals. I haven't figured out this theory yet, nor how to test it, but these gunshot monitors might be one tool to use in testing a dispute resolution model to reducing gang violence. If it was used to inform where we focus our intelligence efforts and then, hearts-and-minds activities (e.g. after-school programs, athletics, etc.).
Angie Crow's comment, September 16, 1:47 PM
I think that this is definitely an interesting article. I personally had no idea that only 1 out of 5 gunshots are reported. It is scary to think that this is going on around me and I am not even aware of it. I can definitely see why parents are afraid for their children's safety. Although, I had never put much thought in to this idea before, I don't see how it can be a reliable tool in the court system. As stated in the article only 7% of what is picked up by the microphones is true. It would be hard to convict someone based off of these microphones. They may have potential to being a good idea, it is more important that we are investing in our police force more than the microphones. The article stated that many police forces don't have the necessary tools and money to look in to the majority of the gunshots and when they do they are going after someone that may or may not exist. I think that it may be scary to know that this occurs but only place our resources where it is most vital.
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Former Wichita Police Chief Williams was on credibility-issues list, documents show

Former Wichita Police Chief Williams was on credibility-issues list, documents show | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Norman Williams – until Friday the chief of the state’s largest police department – was on a list of Wichita police personnel who could have credibility issues should they be called to testify in criminal cases, according to information the city has released.
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Feds Donate Thousands of Bayonets to Local Police

Feds Donate Thousands of Bayonets to Local Police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The recent political crisis in Ferguson, MO put a national spotlight on police militarization. For years, the Department of Defense has been sending military ha

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Rob Duke's insight:

The K-Bar knife was designed to be the equivalent of that foldy shovel or swiss army knife.  It's the belt knife and it can mount as a bayonet.  To say that the army donated a bunch of bayonets is misleading, but that's what we get for over-using our military equipment and training.

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Clay Faris's comment, September 11, 5:46 PM
Rob, agreed. The headline is quite misleading. However the larger issue of the police having military equipment (MRAPS, Bearcats, ceramic plate carriers, etc) and military training/tactics is very real. The militarization of the police in the US should concern everyone. Wonder if we should thank Daryl Gates for starting all of this? Haha!
Andrew Marso's comment, September 14, 2:51 AM
I agree with you, Clay. This militarization is quite concerning. We forbid the military from acting within our country then turn the police into the military. The part I found very disturbing about this article, however, was the "what if scenarios." If this is the excuse for militarization there is no end.
Rob Duke's comment, September 14, 12:37 PM
Clay: No doubt, it's been abused. When we have the equipment and training, it's hard not to use it. Having said that, one of my brothers is alive today because of an MRAP. He was ambushed and pinned down by an angel dust hyped up cartel member with a fully auto AR-15. My brother had just a curb to protect him and his .40 Glock. The entry team arrived minutes later with an MRAP and drove up over the curb covering my brother while other officers engaged the bad guy. This was L.A., but this sort of thing happens all over now. We lost 3 or 4 officers to ambushes in the last 24 hours in the heartland, as well as, in cities. This is the second paradox that I talk about in Black Board: even condemned prisoners get last requests--officers are always going to feel justified in the idea that they will do what it takes to go home at the end of watch. How do we withhold that power (and appropriate tools)?
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LOS ANGELES TIMES CARTOON: Why the Fuzz Pulled You Over

LOS ANGELES TIMES CARTOON: Why the Fuzz Pulled You Over | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Crime is falling in California. Yet the state’s police agencies have one of the highest concentrations of surplus military hardware in the United States. People started paying more attention to a post-9/11 Defense Department program to transfer military gear used against Afghanistan and Iraq to civilian police departments here in the United States in the […]
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The Painkiller Abuse Problem Doctor's Can't Stop

The Painkiller Abuse Problem Doctor's Can't Stop | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
State laws aren't doing much against a growing overdose epidemic
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Heather Wiinikka's comment, Today, 12:58 PM
I think it should get to the point where if a patient continually comes in for pain drugs there has to be a point where the doctor stops prescribing them. If the patient is seriously in pain then the doctors need find out what is going on with them and and fix it. Another, thing that i think should happen and i am sure it can be done today with the technology we have is there should be a data base set up throughout all pharmacy's that will only allow a person a certain amount of pills a prescriptions of pain pills in a year, because many people will jump from Dr. to hospital just seek pain pills but if we have this database and person get multiple prescriptions then it will red flag them and it will tell the pharmacist that they can not fill that prescription.
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Grand jury gets an extension

Grand jury gets an extension | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The grand jury hearing evidence in the Michael Brown case has until Jan. 7 to decide on charges.
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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, Today, 4:14 AM
I think this article is a really hard case. At first it does seem as a police officer was abusing his power, but when I read that the guy who was killed was reaching a gun, my opinion changed. I think that’s how the officers are trained, if someone is reaching their gun they will defend themselves and the public around them. Of course, I do think that 6 bullets is too much, and if I would be the officer I would shoot the legs of a guy and not the head or a body. This case sure need some more involvement from the jury, and the court, but I think the officer should have to be responsible for what he did. As is I said, even if it was necessary to shoot, he could’ve slotted that guy’s legs and not the body.
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Transformational Leadership Survey

Transformational Leadership Survey | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A short survey designed to help you assess your Transformational Leadership skills.

Via Susan Bainbridge
Rob Duke's insight:

How well are you equipped to change an organization?

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Urban Outfitters Hits New Low With Faux Blood-Stained Kent State Sweatshirt

Urban Outfitters Hits New Low With Faux Blood-Stained Kent State Sweatshirt | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In its endless quest to seem edgy, Urban Outfitters has gone too far once more.

The store offered a one-of-a-kind Kent State University sweatshirt splattered with red coloring for $129. The tactless garment is a clear reference to the 1970 killing...
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Militarized police in America. Scranton Police disrespecting a woman and more!!! - YouTube

Bringing (connected) dude's along for a arrest warrant, seizing property without owners consent. Thats how things are done in Scranton, PA i guess they think...
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's some of those Paradoxes that you'll see in Muir's article/chapter on the "professional police" in an upcoming segment.  The more power we wield (particularly hard power), the more we are vulnerable to one of the four paradoxes of coercive power:

Paradox of Dispossession

Paradox of Detachment

Paradox of Face

Paradox of Irrationality

Here, a "relaxed" version of all the officer safety tools that save law enforcement lives when things become exigent, are construed to be irrational (and look a little silly).  You can see that the tactical guys feel like the only guys that showed up in tuxes for a little garden party.

It'd be nice to have more facts, but it seems like this might be something between neighbors that got out of hand (the comment about trespassing and cctv make me think that).  I can certainly see that this woman is pugnacious and that can make an entire neighborhood tense (though, as I said, there's not enough facts here to know the whole story).

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Sarah O'Leary's comment, Today, 1:12 AM
First of all, the background of this story is not given. I think the publisher of the video believes they did nothing wrong where it is clear they committed a crime for the police to show up. Some of the things said were taken out of context I'm sure and some of the things that were "subtitled" were things that I couldn't clearly hear. The only thing that is clear is that this person wanted to video tape the cops so that they could find any little slip up to bust them, while they themselves were clearly being busted for a crime committed.
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, Today, 4:27 AM
To me, this is a clear abuse of police power. They didn’t have any rights to enter the house or to arrest them. I am also kind of surprised how rude they were and they weren’t playing by law. I kind of got a feeling that they wanted to just take them from the beginning. In my opinion these actions of police were unprofessional and unlawful.
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New Mike Brown Shooting Video May Support Claims Of Surrender

New Mike Brown Shooting Video May Support Claims Of Surrender | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A man is heard saying Mike Brown surrendered, and witnesses are seen with their hands in the air moments after the shooting.
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Django Unchained Actress Accosted by LAPD After Kissing White Husband

Django Unchained Actress Accosted by LAPD After Kissing White Husband | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Danièle Watts, an African-American actress who played Coco in Django Unchained and appears as Martin Lawrence's daughter on FX's Partners, says she was handcuffed and detained on Thursday by police in Los Angeles who suspected she was a prostitute.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's one of those paradoxes that I talked about in the Black Board posts.  Citizen's call and we want to make them happy.  In this case, another citizen's rights were arguably infringed upon to do so...what do you think?  If one citizen thinks another is suspicious and they call us; and we arrive and think "hmm, this might be racist b.s." should we just move on?

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Rob Duke's comment, Today, 12:41 AM
It's not a job that you can worry about pleasing everyone: that's for sure.
Tonya Metteer Howell's comment, Today, 3:22 AM
I absolutely agree with Angie that gathering facts is imperative for police actions. That being said, some situations are hurried and quick thinking needs to be applied. With this entire situation, the fact that someone else asked the two of these people to cease their questionable behaviors for the sake of others, yet they did not comply, depicts to me a personality of selfishness and immaturity. People have rights, yes, but those rights should allow others' rights to remain protected. Obviously, in this situation, the social order was disrupted and citizens felt a need to defer to police. The fact that the race card was attempted to be used should not be applicable to the situation because the call was concerning lewd conduct, of which she was certainly guilty. People can justify there actions whether they have substantive evidence or not. This particular situation warranted police intervention and the violations had nothing to do with skin color.
Clay Faris's comment, Today, 3:55 PM
I'll use another example that we run into fairly regularly here in Alaska. The ubiquitous "man with a gun" call. I'll stipulate the situation isn't quite the same, but I believe it's close enough to make the point. Cops get a call about a "man with a gun" who is "scaring" people. Cops respond and contact the man who is simply walking down the street. He's not threatening anyone, not brandishing the weapon, he's just minding his own business and exercising his 2nd Amendment rights. At that point do I, as a police officer, even have the right to identify the man? He is engaging in zero criminal behavior, so on what grounds can he be detained? A "suspicion" isn't enough. A citizen who is freaked out because the man has a gun isn't enough. It's not illegal in Alaska for the man to carry a gun. Does that mean the cops just go away? No......we need to determine these things before moving on, but it's a very fine line and a difficult one to walk at times, particularly if the man is unwilling (with good reason imho) to identify himself. I'm not familiar with LAPD procedures, or California law in particular, so I cannot speak to whether or not an officer can demand ID during suspicious circumstances when it is quickly determined that no criminal behavior has taken place. In this particular case it seems the police were justified in detaining the parties involved, because there was concern of a criminal activity taking place.
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Remembering the Real Violence in Ferguson

Remembering the Real Violence in Ferguson | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

"Violence has a geography and for this reason, geography lies at the center of discussions of violence. Within the United States a myriad of taken for granted assumptions about identity, place, power, and memory undergird the nation’s psyche.  These normative interpretations intersect with a particular kind of geographic formulation that places persons of color in general, but black men most specifically, at the center of the violent structures of the nation."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 10, 12:36 PM

This isn't merely commentary about social upheaval or some musing about the social inequities (I think we've all read a ton of those articles).  This is a geographic analysis that discusses the interactions, interconnections and implications of a social and spatial conflict between citizens and the institutions of the state.  Ferguson, MO is undoubtedly a lightning rod today and some might prefer to avoid discussing it in a classroom setting; I find that as long as we put analysis before ideology, issues such as these show students the relevance and importance of geographic principles to their lives. 


Tags: race, class, gender, place, poverty, socioeconomic.

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When Dude-Bro Pranksters Punk the Police

When Dude-Bro Pranksters Punk the Police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Florida teens with fake beer experience two different approaches to law enforcement.
Rob Duke's insight:

In my world view, either law enforcement approach is fine.  If these guys had been drinking, then they needed the attitude adjustment.  If not, they asked for this kind of detention.  On the other hand, who among us has not pulled a stupid prank and the second cop knows how to defuse the situation so that it's not nearly as much fun; nor as funny to these guys as the first cops reaction.

P.s. Don't wear your hair long and, if you must have long hair, don't put it in a pony tail, because a bad guy can throw you around by it.  You wonder why cops wear their hair high and dry--so it can't be used against them in a fight.  The only cops that wear long hair that I know of are the Sikhs in India and, then only for religious reasons.  To avoid this situation, they have a complicated wrap that takes an hour each morning to assemble. It's a pain, but you gotta take the time to braid it and put it up on a tight bun if you don't want it to be used against you.

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Rob Duke's comment, September 13, 3:47 PM
I don't prohibit my cops from using profanity if it'll save a life. Telling someone to drop the f*&(ing gun is better than shooting them, but I have to agree with the author. This cop thinks she's getting street cred with these kids, but she's obviously not. A wise partner taught me this back in about 1991 when I was working SMASH. I was doing a pretty good impression of how this office acts in the video and my SMASH partner asks me afterwards: "do you find that this approach that you have works?" He then explained that the local cops where he grew up in Mexico used profanity and were impolite; in contrast the Federales never used profanity and were polite and respectful--this demanded reciprocal respect. It made sense, and, as I tried it, I found I had better success dealing with young men. Then, several months later, we got in a knock down--drag out gang fight and I heard this older cop tell a guy: "don't mistake my politeness for weakness, because I will kick your ass up and down this street if I have to". Later, as were were leaving the call, I asked him: "do you find that this approach that you have works?" He just chuckled and said: "sometimes you have to get their attention".
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Torture: The Use of Solitary Confinement in U.S. Prisons | Center for Constitutional Rights

Torture: The Use of Solitary Confinement in U.S. Prisons | Center for Constitutional Rights | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Via Concerned Citizen, up2-21
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Brittney Ward's comment, September 15, 2:30 AM
Solitary confinement has always been a part of our prison system. The SHU (security housing unit) exists in many prison systems and is used to detain troubled inmates. The conditions of solitary confinement alone I don't see as cruel and unusual. I think the grey area here is time frame. Leaving someone in solitary for undermined amount of time could have psychological affects on that person.
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Both sides of marijuana battle meet at forum in Fairbanks

Both sides of marijuana battle meet at forum in Fairbanks | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Note: Professor Kelly Drew's name was incorrectly listed in a prior version of the story. It has been since updated.
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Rob Duke's comment, September 14, 12:24 PM
Now's a good time to do the pull back, too. As the economy heats up, we could cut spending on narcotics enforcement, retire some debt, thus accomplishing smart monetary policy; and, as the business cycle matures, we would taper out by lowering taxes. My guess is that, like alcohol and tobacco, there's a tax and tariff model that would make MJ and drugs pay for their own healthcare needs.
Brittney Ward's comment, September 15, 2:38 AM

I agree with Andrew here, legalization would result in an economy boost. Cutting spending on drug enforcement and being able to tax marijuana like we do alcohol would create revenue. Not to mention relieving correctional facilities from misdemeanor offenders would help the overcrowding problem we have in the prison system.
Heather Wiinikka's comment, Today, 1:11 PM
I understand all of your responses and opinions but i do not think it should be legalized just like i do not think alcohol should be legal. Legalizing marijuana is gonna put more drivers under the influence driving our roads creating more accidents, injuries and deaths. More and more people make more editable treats with marijuana and kids are not going to know any better and that can be very harmful to a child. I think it is stupid. Everyone is saying it will boost the economy is that more important than loosing loved ones because we have user's driving wile intoxicated just like with drinking i think it is all dumb. Sorry if i offend any of you but this is my opinion.