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Judge Limits N.Y.P.D. Stop-and-Frisk Program in Bronx

Judge Limits N.Y.P.D. Stop-and-Frisk Program in Bronx | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A federal judge ruled that the practice of stopping people suspected of trespassing outside private buildings in the Bronx was unconstitutional.
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Suspect in killing of trooper ID'd after being shot dead in hourslong standoff

Suspect in killing of trooper ID'd after being shot dead in hourslong standoff | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The suspect in Wednesday's fatal shooting of a Delaware state trooper was shot and killed today after an hours-long standoff with authorities.
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Venice skateboarder who claimed LAPD beat him loses case

Venice skateboarder who claimed LAPD beat him loses case | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Los Angeles federal jury unanimously rejected a civil rights lawsuit by a Venice skateboarder who claimed several Los Angeles police officers wrestled him to the ground, beat him and punched him in the head. Ronald Weekley Jr., a 20-year-old African American college student, had allege
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Stopshooting2

Stopshooting2 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Again, it is very important to remember that the brain of the officer who is focused on his or her front sight actually works to suppress the information about whatever else is going on in front of him or her for a very brief period while the officer is engaged in focusing and shooting (Vickers, 2007, p. 54). This also holds true for the brain of the officer who is focused on kinesthetic alignment, making a decision while being distracted with intrusive thoughts or anything else that draws his or her attention away from the threat. Logically, this makes sense because it is hard to simultaneously focus equally on two things at the same time or to even think of two things at the same time especially under threats to one’s life. Neurologists such as Dr. Joseph LeDoux (1996) remind us about how and why we become very rigid, concrete, and inflexible in our attention and problem solving under this high level of stress. The more sudden and unprepared we are for the assault, the more instinctive our responses will be.
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Hitting a Major League fastball should be physically impossible

Hitting a Major League fastball should be physically impossible | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
VIDEO: Hitters need to gauge the pitch in less than the blink of an eye.
Rob Duke's insight:
Imagine these same physics, but now the guy has a gun that fires a bullet at 850 (.45) to 1300 feet per second (9mm)--how elite an athlete do you need to be to accurately respond.  You don't get nearly as much practice as you need.  And, it seems significant that major league players have no time to think, yet we continue to evaluate cops with a fantasy that somehow they had time to think before some of these incidents.
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What Happens When the Courts Take Officers at Their Word?

What Happens When the Courts Take Officers at Their Word? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Critics accuse federal judges of too easily trusting law enforcement in cases involving excessive force. This week, the Supreme Court declined its chance to echo—or dismiss—that allegation.  
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Why You Must Never Show Your Middle Finger to a Man With a Big Truck - CrasHHunters.com

Why You Must Never Show Your Middle Finger to a Man With a Big Truck - CrasHHunters.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Why You Must Never Show Your Middle Finger to a Man With a Big Truck This is not because every driver is a bad guy or has hot blood in his veins
Rob Duke's insight:
Yup, and when the cops get there, the guy in the silver car is going to lie.  It gets old and cops get cynical.
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California bill would make it harder to punish police officers who have been accused of lying

California bill would make it harder to punish police officers who have been accused of lying | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A bill would make it harder for police departments to discipline officers for making false statements. It's backed by the L.A. police union.
Rob Duke's insight:
This is a good move.  From what I've seen the only ones targeted with Brady are: a. those who are caught in a significant, material (they lied and it puts someone in jail), and public (can't be denied or covered up); and/or, b. those who are unpopular with command.
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Will Jeff Sessions Police the Police?

Will Jeff Sessions Police the Police? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Sessions has expressed disdain not only for consent decrees but for the very idea that police departments can be systemically flawed.
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DA: California police justified in shooting caught on video

DA: California police justified in shooting caught on video | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A California police officer acted lawfully when he shot and killed a legally blind man with schizophrenia during an encounter at a gas station in 2015, prosecutors said Tuesday.A report made public Tuesday by the Sa
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Man injured in possible ‘suicide by cop’ attempt in North Hills

Man injured in possible ‘suicide by cop’ attempt in North Hills | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A man was in stable condition Sunday following an officer-involved shooting after he brandished what turned out to be a replica gun in North Hills the day before, Los Angeles police said.At about 6:15 a.m. Saturday, LAPD officers from Mission a
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Major new biography, exhibit on August Vollmer, Berkeley's first police chief

Major new biography, exhibit on August Vollmer, Berkeley's first police chief | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In the first part of the 20th century, Berkeley’s first police chief was a household name. When Americans thought about the giants of crimefighting, August Vollmer was in the pantheon that included FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover and Wyatt Earp, the deputy marshal who participated in the gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

His renown was understandable. Vollmer started as town marshal in 1905 and then took over the new Berkeley Police Department in 1909. He was an innovator and ushered in many improvements that are commonplace today, earning him the nickname of the “father of American policing.”

Vollmer was the first to put an entire police force on bicycles. He improved the way police got information about crime, first by installing flashing red recall lights scattered around Berkeley that told officers to return to headquarters, then by using Morse Code to deliver to them the address where a crime had been committed. Vollmer was the first to have his force use cars, earning officers the nickname “limousine police.”  Vollmer hired the country’s first female police officer in 1917 and its first African-American officer in 1918. He insisted on collecting physical evidence from crime scenes and using that evidence — rather than hunches — to find criminals. His protégés invented the lie detector and the Berkeley Police Department was among the first to use it. Vollmer also required that all Berkeley police officers have a college degree.

Vollmer also believed in the humanity of criminals and that they could be redeemed, rejecting the use of brute force and intense interrogations such as the third degree, a common practice of torture in that time.



Today, Vollmer’s name is not widely recognized, even among Berkeley residents. Yes, there is Vollmer Peak, in Tilden Park, but few know the details about his life and accomplishments.


Willard M. Oliver, the author of a new biography about Berkeley’s first police chief, August Vollmer, stands in front of an old lie detector that was developed by Vollmer’s proteges and used by the police department. Photo: Frances Dinkelspiel
Willard M. Oliver, a professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas, hopes to change that. And his chances are good, as his new 780-page book, August Vollmer: The Father of American Policing — the first comprehensive biography on the police chief — has just been published. Oliver and the Berkeley Historical Society have also worked together to create a major new exhibit on Vollmer. The show opens Sunday at 3 p.m. at 1931 Center St. Oliver will deliver a talk with photos before that, at 2 p.m. at Old City Hall, 2134 Martin Luther King Jr. Way.

Read about the rediscovery of Vollmer’s long-lost gold-and-diamond badge, found in Texas by a pair of booksellers
“The name faded with time,” said Steve Finacom, a historian who helped with the Vollmer exhibit now on display. “His life and his philosophy are very relevant today. For example, how would Vollmer have reacted to the extremist gathering in the park?” he said, pointing to Civic Center Park, across the street from the Historical Society and the site of recent protests.
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New York's mayor blasts Sessions' 'soft on crime' statement

New York's mayor blasts Sessions' 'soft on crime' statement | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Mayor Bill de Blasio and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions engaged in a war of words on Friday over a Department of Justice statement accusing the city of being "soft on crime."

The department said New York "continues to see gang murder after gang murder, the predictable consequence of the city's 'soft on crime' stance."

The statement was part of an ongoing dispute between Republican President Donald Trump and cities including New York over immigration policy, with the Trump administration threatening to crack down on so-called sanctuary cities that refuse to comply with federal immigration authorities.

The Democratic mayor called the "soft on crime" characterization "absolutely outrageous."

"Attorney General Sessions is supposed to be the leading law enforcement official in America," de Blasio said. "Why would he insult the men and women who do this work every day, who put their lives on the line and who have achieved so much?"

Police Commissioner James O'Neill, who appeared with de Blasio at police headquarters, said the "soft on crime" statement made his blood boil.

"To say we're soft on crime is absolutely ludicrous," O'Neill said.

He said his police department, by far the nation's largest, locked up more than 1,000 people in 100 gang takedowns last year.
Rob Duke's insight:
Ask the cops of NYPD...de Blasio is not well-liked and they will tell a different story on crime fighting than he has told here.
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Sheriff, police chiefs denounce NTSB report on fatal bicycle crash

Sheriff, police chiefs denounce NTSB report on fatal bicycle crash | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
On Thursday, Kalamazoo County Sheriff Fuller issued a joint statement with Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety Chief Jeff Hadley and Kalamazoo Township Police Chief Tim Bourgeois responding to the report.
Rob Duke's insight:
The risk-reward factor should be considered before bringing in outside investigators who: a. don't understand the actual practitioner roles, duties, and limitations; b. have their own political agenda.

Replacing one biased investigation for another isn't much in terms of progress.
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Video meant to rebut LAPD statements is bogus

Video meant to rebut LAPD statements is bogus | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
It was meant to be a smoking gun: A grainy security video that proved police corruption.

Officers said they had stopped Rafat Abdallah because his white Mercedes was missing a license plate. During a search of the car, they discovered a loaded handgun -- a serious crime for a convicted felon like Abdallah.

But the footage, taken from a surveillance camera, clearly showed a license plate on Rafat Abdallah's white Mercedes as he left his business just moments before officers pulled him over.

The video was proof, Abdallah's attorney contended, that the police officers fabricated their story about the missing license plate.

But it was the video that was fabricated.
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BREAKING: Delaware Trooper Murdered, Suspect Still Shooting At Officers

BREAKING: Delaware Trooper Murdered, Suspect Still Shooting At Officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Bear, DE - A Delaware State Trooper was gunned down at a Wawa convenience store on Wednesday, and we have confirmed that the hero has died.
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Officer Ambushed by 3 Armed Men. He Pressed the Button to Release His K9. All Hell Broke Loose.

Officer Ambushed by 3 Armed Men. He Pressed the Button to Release His K9. All Hell Broke Loose. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Hancock County, Mississippi Sheriff's deputy is alive today because his K9 partner saved his life on the evening of May 25th. A multi-agency task force has
Rob Duke's insight:
Say hello to my leetle friend!
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Davis police officers attacked on Picnic Day

Davis police officers attacked on Picnic Day | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Three men were arrested following an attack on Davis police officers who encountered a group of people blocking traffic on a busy roadway during Saturday’s Picnic Day at UC Davis.

The annual campus open house has become known in recent years for violence and drunken mayhem, mainly on the streets of the normally quiet college town.

The latest incident occurred abut 3:30 p.m. Saturday, when three Davis police officers traveling on Russell Boulevard in an unmarked police vehicle encountered a large group of people in the roadway, blocking traffic, according to a Police Department news release.

One officer was in uniform with a visible badge. The other two were in plain clothes, but with badges clearly displayed on their chests and with police weapons visible, the news release said.

Traffic on Russell Boulevard was nearly gridlocked at the time due to Picnic Day activities and several large parties in the area. Because the group presented safety hazards, the officers pulled near the group to take action, according to police.

A hostile group quickly surrounded the vehicle. Several people began yelling threats at the officers in the car, and one person pretended he was pulling a gun on the officers, the news release said.

As the officers got out of the car and began to identify themselves as police, two officers were attacked by several people and beaten on the ground. Police reported that the officers were kicked and punched in the head, and one officer was struck on the side of the head with a bottle.

As they were being assaulted, the officers could see people in the crowd taking video of the attack on their cellphones, according to the news release.

The officers fought back and called for help. Two of the officers were taken to the Sutter Davis Hospital emergency room for treatment. One suffered injuries to his eye and face, and the other was treated for a bleeding head wound caused by a bottle, the news release said.
Rob Duke's insight:
After the 99% riots of 2012, and several officers were fired at UC Davis, and the people's republic of davis (as it is know tongue-in-cheek in the Sacramento area) being no more friendly to officers, it's not surprising that officers are careful not to risk losing their jobs.  That's a poor trade off, however, because mobs don't think rationally.
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Three Pittsburgh officers refuse to testify before police review board

Three Pittsburgh officers refuse to testify before police review board | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Citizen Police Review Board has turned to the courts to force three Pittsburgh police officers to testify about an incident involving a suicidal woman who was taken to jail rather than to a hospital for treatment.

The CPRB, which was approved by voters in a May 1997 referendum to provide independent oversight and investigation of citizen complaints about police, subpoenaed the officers after a complaint filed by Rayden Sorock of Lawrenceville.

According to the complaint, Mr. Sorock called police on March 30, 2015, after a female friend experiencing “a psychiatric episode” threatened to hurt herself with a surgical scalpel. The officers who responded — Matthew Gardner, Nicholas Papa and Christopher Rosato — said the woman would be taken to either Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC or to UPMC Mercy, Mr. Sorock said.

Instead, the complaint said, the woman was taken to the Allegheny County Jail, where she was held for threatening the officers. The complaint did not say how the matter was resolved.

In response to Mr. Sorock’s complaint, the CPRB subpoenaed the officers to a Jan. 26 public hearing. Officer Gardner refused to appear. Officers Papa and Rosato appeared but refused to testify.

“The officers have that right,” said Officer Robert Swartzwelder, president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 1. “According to the collective bargaining agreement with the city, they are not required to testify. An officer is free to testify if they choose to, but they cannot be compelled to. They have the right to make their own decision.”

But Beth Pittinger, CPRB executive director since January 1999, said police had refused to cooperate with the board in the past, and the courts have consistently come down on the side of the CPRB.

It has been more than 10 years, she said, since an officer refused.

“Why are they resisting?” Ms. Pittinger said. “Now all of a sudden they’re saying no. The precedent had been established in local and commonwealth courts. The board’s subpoena is real.

“Their attorney is claiming that the police contract with the city prohibits the city from requiring them to testify before the board. And that’s fine.

“We’re not asking the city to require them. The board is doing it, and like any subpoena, it’s making somebody do something they wouldn’t voluntarily choose to do. But the board needs to get the facts.”

In 2003, Commonwealth Court Judge Robert Gallo ruled that “it is undisputed that the CPRB has the authority to subpoena officers for the purpose of providing testimony at public hearings.”

Ms. Pittinger said the current case, which is set for a May 15 court hearing, is one of two in which officers are not complying. A complaint on the other one, she said, would be filed in court in the coming days.

Officer Swartzwelder said police are also subject to investigations by the Office of Municipal Investigations and the Office of Professional Standards, created by former police Chief Cameron McLay.

“Three different bodies,” he said, “so somebody can get angry and complain about police and then shop and get the result that they’re seeking. How many times do [officers] have to give their statement?”

The argument that the CPRB is not part of the city government is refuted, he said, because the board gets its budget from the city. Representatives of the city and the police bureau could not be reached for comment Monday night.
Rob Duke's insight:
They still do witch hunts in some jurisdictions.  3 different boards that have a chance to discipline officers is crazy.

Every state needs a Peace Officer Bill of Rights with laws that protect officers with a time limit on investigations, and that specify that attorneys and peace officers are the only ones allowed to complete investigations.
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Judge hogties free speech lawsuit over Ferguson cops-as-pigs painting

Judge hogties free speech lawsuit over Ferguson cops-as-pigs painting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A federal judge ruled against a lawsuit seeking redemption for the removal of a US Capitol painting depicting cops as violent pigs, stating the artist’s free speech rights were not violated when the painting was removed after protests by Republicans.
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Valley residents to weigh in on releasing LAPD body camera videos of police shootings

Valley residents to weigh in on releasing LAPD body camera videos of police shootings | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
If a Los Angeles police officer shoots at someone, would you want that video released to the public?That is the question being asked by the Los Angeles Police Commission at a community meeting in Reseda on Thursday.The meeting will begin
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Is police misconduct treated differently in the cellphone video age?

Is police misconduct treated differently in the cellphone video age? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Are police departments reacting differently now when confronted with video evidence showing the misconduct of officers?
It depends on who you ask.
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Safe cams help police, local businesses solve crime

Safe cams help police, local businesses solve crime | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
La Crosse police officer Brooke Pataska says in the one year they've been installed, the cameras have made her job a little easier.
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Berkeley police treasure found in Texas 'mystery box'

Berkeley police treasure found in Texas 'mystery box' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A priceless artifact from Berkeley police history, which turned up in a $5 box of books at an estate sale in Texas, will be on public display for the first time ever Sunday at the Berkeley Historical Society.

Read more about the new Vollmer exhibit and biography. Scroll to the bottom of this story for exhibit details.
The artifact is the long lost 14-karat gold, diamond-studded badge of Berkeley’s first police chief, August Vollmer. It was so far gone, in fact, even the department historian was unaware of its existence as a BPD relic. Vollmer has been called “the father of modern policing,” which is the title of a comprehensive new book about him just published this year. The author of that book will speak Sunday, and the badge will be shown alongside Vollmer’s revolver as part of a program at the Berkeley Historical Society museum celebrating the innovative chief’s history.

The rediscovery of the badge blindsided a couple from a suburb of Austin, Texas, in August 2015. The story has been somewhat under wraps ever since, until Susan Lyons and her husband, Mark — speaking by phone from Texas — shared that story with Berkeleyside. The couple has worked together, as a side job, for more than a decade selling books on Amazon to help put their four children through college. One day, at an estate sale, they picked up about 200 boxes of high-quality books that appeared to have been hastily slapped together. When they later went through those boxes, they were surprised to come across an old leather case.

“Mark’s going through boxes, and he comes up to me and he goes, ‘Do you think this is worth something?'” recalled Susan. “Me being a woman, I know a diamond when I see it. When he handed it to me and I saw Vollmer’s name on it, we both looked at each other and said: ‘This needs to go home.'”
Rob Duke's insight:
Very nice.  The last real time that law enforcement went through planned change.  We need to analyze ourselves and make periodic needed change.  Vollmer, and his protege, O. W. Wilson, taught us that, but it is a lesson we're prone to forget.
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Video Shows Aggressive Confrontation Between American Airlines Staff and Passengers

Video Shows Aggressive Confrontation Between American Airlines Staff and Passengers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Video emerged on Friday showing the disturbing aftermath of a confrontation between American Airlines flight staff and at least three passengers. The video, attached at the end of this story, shows a deeply distraught female passenger crying near the airplane cabin as two other passengers confront airline staff. One male passenger tells a male crew member that “you do that to me, and I’ll knock you flat.” The crew member squares off aggressively with the passenger, urging him to “bring it,” and saying “you don’t know what the story is.”
The story, according to eyewitness reports gathered by a local Fox affiliate, involved a passenger with two small children who refused a request to check her stroller. In response, a flight attendant—apparently the man shown in the video—called security, then “wrestled” the stroller away from the passenger. Eyewitnesses claim that the passenger was hit in the head, and that her children were in harm’s way.
Rob Duke's insight:
Stewards act as the representatives of the Captains who are virtual dictators of ships and planes under international law.  They have also adopted very formal and polite manners, but the bottom line is do what you're told for the good of the order and the safety of all other passengers--you have a duty to do so.

It seems that we've become so enamored with freedom, that we have forgotten responsibility.  The same forces that have eroded police authority are at work in other areas of our lives (i.e., airline stewards, teachers, etc.).
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