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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Police officer suspended over baboon Facebook post

Police officer suspended over baboon Facebook post | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — A police officer in Westchester County, N.Y., who came under fire last week for a racist post on his Facebook page, was suspended without pay Monday.
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Can Cops Be Honest?

Can Cops Be Honest? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
 “Years ago as a young police officer, I remember finding myself being profoundly enmeshed in the life of being a cop. I soon realized that my identity, social life, and even family life revolved around me being a cop. I worked every day with police and socialized with them when I was off-duty. My preferred company was other police. I also realized I was closer to the man I was paired with at work—my partner—than I was to the woman to whom I was married. I shared more of my thoughts, feelings, hopes, and dreams with him than I did with her. Each day at work, I trusted my partner with my life. And then I realized that if he did something wrong, I would no more give him up than I would my own mother.

“This is the power of a subculture… a distinct group of people who have patterns of behavior and beliefs that set them apart from society as a whole…

“Throughout my career I learned that without effective oversight, adequate salaries, and high public expectations, police will slide backwards—because left alone, isolated, underpaid, and with low public expectations, these police won’t be the kind of people we want to protect us and our way of life…

“If the police are to be kept free from corruption, honesty and integrity must be among their fiercest internal values…”

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Marianne PokeBunny Lenaerts's comment, Today, 6:45 AM
yes they can sweetie .. got a few in my list on fedbook .. 1 is even Anonymous ... cops are waking up too <3
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Alan Dershowitz: Officers cannot get a fair trial

Alan Dershowitz: Officers cannot get a fair trial | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Alan Dershowitz, defense attorney and Harvard Law School professor, explains the legal case against the six Baltimore police officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray.
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My Baltimore eighth-graders' response to the question, 'What now?' left me speechless

My Baltimore eighth-graders' response to the question, 'What now?' left me speechless | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“If it was me, if I was old enough, I would be out there, too, but not doing it like they are doing it,” another said. But she seemed torn. “I think people are just fed up with police brutality.”

One student explained to the others that there was a difference between protests and riots. “What they did yesterday, that was riots. They took this protesting as an excuse and took advantage of Freddie Gray’s death to rob stores and for petty items,” he said.

“But at the end of the day, violence, period, doesn’t help any situation. Its like punching a hole in the wall; at the end of the day, you gon’ have to fix that hole. It’s just like 1968. They set us back as a city.” The student looked around as her peers agreed with her but I could see it in her face, in this moment, she wished that she wasn’t right.
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The Backwards Brain Bicycle - Smarter Every Day 133 - YouTube

Free Audio Book ⇒ http://bit.ly/AudibleSED ⇐ (I really do love the Commander's book!) Tweet ⇒ http://bit.ly/BackwardsBike ⇐ Post to FB⇒ http://bit.ly/Backwar...
Rob Duke's insight:

This video illustrates how difficult it is to reprogram our biases.  We know what we know and the only way to convince someone else is to switch places with them for enough time that they can have that "moment" when the algorithm "sticks".

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History: Birmingham police use dogs and firehoses - Jackson Clarion Ledger

History: Birmingham police use dogs and firehoses - Jackson Clarion Ledger | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
History: Freedom Riders begin journey, Birmingham police use dogs and firehoses

Via Dorothy Retha Cook
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L.A. Port police chief indicted in alleged fraud scheme

L.A. Port police chief indicted in alleged fraud scheme | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The chief of police at the nation's busiest container port was indicted Thursday on federal corruption charges that accuse him of hiding his business links to a software developer he was helping win a contract at the port.
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Complaints in Baltimore About Law Offering Protections for Officers

Complaints in Baltimore About Law Offering Protections for Officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Commonly known as the police officers’ bill of rights, among its provisions is giving officers 10 days before they have to talk to investigators.
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Justice Dept. Announces $20 Million Cop Body Camera Pilot

Justice Dept. Announces $20 Million Cop Body Camera Pilot | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The funding will pay for body cameras and training
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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, May 3, 6:33 PM
Cool. Let us see if they actually get to keep the money to go through with it though. Plus, I am sure that if someone really wanted to do something they could find a way around it, but it will help the honest cop out.
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Baltimore Riots Tragedy Is a Cry for Transformative Leadership - US News

Baltimore Riots Tragedy Is a Cry for Transformative Leadership - US News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Solving the social problems behind the Baltimore riots requires the sort of politicians we don't have.

Via Joe Boutte
Rob Duke's insight:

Some faciliitation between community leaders and their administrators is needed.

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Joe Boutte's curator insight, May 1, 10:01 AM

In the wake of the riots we see examples of everyday leadership from the people of Baltimore who refuse to be characterized by the lawless behavior of some their youth.  Examples of humanity and community continue to emerge.  Although the press seems to want to focus on the sensational, the quiet leaders of Baltimore persevere amongst the noise to repair and rebuild.  New leaders will emerge and the press will go away, but it's  the everyday, and sometimes, nameless leaders that will transform Baltimore and other urban hotspots.  Additionally, the police departments are filled with everyday leaders who build bridges with the community one person at a time.  Hopefully, the press will start highlighting the "better angels" of Baltimore, citizens and law enforcement officers.  It's the right thing to do!  Here are some highlights from the US News article that I find encouraging or transformative:

 

- "Riots can also serve as a powerful contrast for the goodness in humans – and we all cheered for the mother who disciplined her son for joining the rioters. "

 

- "We were all grateful for the construction workers who brought materials from their job site to board up broken storefront windows. We all respected the citizens of Baltimore who lined up beside the cops to send a message: This must stop now."

 

- "Those who are too assured, whose comments are too rooted in the one-note tune of blame, aren’t leaders."

 

- "If we cannot produce leaders who can connect with the people, the cycle of human conflict will continue in the U.S. Old wounds won’t heal. Fighting will persist. The desire for transformative leadership has never been so palpable, or so remote."

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VIDEO: San Francisco BART Cops Slam Drunk Woman Face-First in Concrete Floor For No Reason

VIDEO: San Francisco BART Cops Slam Drunk Woman Face-First in Concrete Floor For No Reason | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Bay Area Rapid Transit police face a lawsuit claiming they used excessive force on a drunken woman last year.

The woman claims newly released video of the incident shows officers violently knocking her to the ground for no reason. The encounter allegedly left her with broken bones, reports CB

Via Doingtime2, Jocelyn Stoller
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Doingtime2's curator insight, May 1, 3:23 PM

The woman claims newly released video of the incident shows officers violently knocking her to the ground for no reason. The encounter allegedly left her with broken bones, reports CBS News correspondent Ben Tracy.

In the new video, Megan Sheehan can be seen waiting for a train after a night of heavy drinking when BART police officers arrested her.

“I was so embarrassed when I saw the videos. I can’t believe what I was saying. I was just so belligerent and foolish,” Sheehan said.

Despite her behavior, she said, nothing she did justifies what happened next at the Santa Rita jail.

“Don’t touch me like that!” Sheehan can be heard saying in the video. Then she hit the floor.

In his police report, the officer said Sheehan “suddenly turned towards me and began violently punching with a closed fist at my face.” He went on: “To protect myself from her attack … I used an arm-bar take-down and guided her to the ground.”

But Sheehan and her attorneys said footage from surveillance and police body cameras tells another story.

“We don’t see Megan Sheehan trying to punch the officer several times in the face,” her attorney Lizabeth de Vries said. “We don’t see her doing anything that would cause any officer to believe she was an imminent threat that requires this kind of force. … What we see is, without any of this happening, two officers held back Megan Sheehan’s arms and threw her face first to the ground.”

“I had a gash above my left eye, I had a few stitches there, I had four broken bones around my orbital socket, and stitches in my lip, and they knocked out a tooth and chipped another one,” Sheehan said.

Sheehan filed a federal civil rights lawsuit claiming officers used excessive and unreasonable force.

“Whether they thought she was so belligerent and so drunk that she had it coming — I don’t know,” de Vries said.

“I was already arrested, I was already in custody, there was police all around and I don’t know why they had to use that much force,” Sheehan said.

A spokeswoman for BART said the agency would not comment because of the pending litigation.

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Report: Freddie Gray sustained injury in police van - CNN.com

Report: Freddie Gray sustained injury in police van - CNN.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A second prisoner, who was picked up after Gray, told investigators that he thought Gray "was intentionally trying to injure himself, according to The Washington Post.
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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, May 3, 6:40 PM
Interesting. Wonder how they will bring this into the case or how they will decide to use it. If he did try to injure himself, that really just goes to show us how far people will try and press this issue.
Rob Duke's comment, May 3, 7:11 PM
That witness is now saying that he's had death threats and is now toning down his statement.
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Can You Run From Police? US Courts Apply a Double Standard

When police spotted Freddie Gray and he took off running through his Baltimore neighborhood, officers made a split-second decision to give chase, setting in motion his death in custody and rioting in the streets. Fleeing from police is not, by itself, illegal in America, and the U.S....
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My Husband Is A Police Officer, And I Owe You An Apology - Uniform Stories

My Husband Is A Police Officer, And I Owe You An Apology - Uniform Stories | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
he’s never cared if you see him for his worth or not. He doesn’t care if you have any respect for him or if you loathe him. He will still be there for you. He will help you. He will save you. He will stand in front of your bullet to save an innocent behind him. I don’t think you’re worth it, and I apologize for not being as good of a person to you as he is.
Rob Duke's insight:

Hands down, I've always known my wife is the better person of the two of us.  I have a pragmatic side that will let the chips fall where they may.  I try not to be that way, but if it comes to live or die, I choose life and I choose victim over offender.  My wife has always called me on this; and, I've needed that a few times in my career.

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GRAPHIC Body Cam: Previously violent suspect refuses to stand up and come to officer: K-9 used to ensure compliance.

Graphic body cam footage shows police allow a K-9 to viciously attack a man sitting on his couch with his hands raised
Rob Duke's insight:

The article isn't the least bit objective.  This guy's prior conduct is important.  It's also important to have heard the threats he made as they approached.  A man sitting in a chair or on a couch has too many ways to hide a weapon that the officer has a reasonable reason to ask him to stand up and move out of that cluttered room.  He warns the man that noncompliance will result in the dog being used.  It looks like a good 'bite' to me.

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Are police tactics too tough? -

Detroit Police Chief James Craig and Fmr. NYPD Police Chief Bernard Kerik discuss police tactics and the death of Freddie Gray.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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KnownNobody ◼️◾️▪️ (@bydvnlln) • Instagram photos and videos

KnownNobody ◼️◾️▪️ (@bydvnlln) • Instagram photos and videos | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
:: The Beauty of Realism & Pragmatism :: All photo's created by: #DVNLLN please respect my art :::: Dvnllnprints@gmail.com
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Baltimore prosecutor: If you don’t hold bad cops accountable it does a disservice to good cops

Baltimore prosecutor: If you don’t hold bad cops accountable it does a disservice to good cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Baltmore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby quickly pushed back at CNN host Don Lemon’s premise in an excerpt from their interview posted online on Friday. “It’s been a tough time for you,” Lemon said to begin the interview.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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The Iceberg of Organizational Culture Change (Infographic)

The Iceberg of Organizational Culture Change (Infographic) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
87% of today’s leaders around the world cite culture and employee engagement as one of their top organizational challenges. This is according to a recent report from Deloitte, who interviewed over 3,300 executives and HR leaders in 106 countries. The data in this and other large-scale studies weave together an alarming trend around today’s changing corporate landscape: Changing demands of the emerging workforce and looming leadership development challenges are growing risks for business today. Organizations must find ways to change and adapt to the changing needs of their stakeholders in order to maintain high performance. Organizational culture change at any scale can be challenging. And in order to overcome challenges like these, we often have to start diving into the depths the organization and figure out what is truly driving the culture. But, what does that mean to you as a leader? As Deloitte’s study highlights; many business leaders know the importance of organizational culture,

Via Anne Leong
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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, May 2, 2:58 PM

A good leader considers his organizations culture in everything he does...

FRANK FEATHER ~ Business Futurist's curator insight, May 2, 4:30 PM

The biggest and most important aspects of organization culture often lie buried deep down, and often are deliberately suppressed. True leaders, raise the best aspects of organization culture to the surface, and build upon those elements to create an inspiring culture that transform the organization and its marketplace success.

James D Johnson's curator insight, May 2, 4:37 PM

Drucker's famous quote on Culture revisited...critical stuff

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Marilyn Mosby, Prosecutor in Freddie Gray Case, Seen as Tough on Police Misconduct

Marilyn Mosby, Prosecutor in Freddie Gray Case, Seen as Tough on Police Misconduct | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Ms. Mosby, who on Friday announced criminal charges against six police officers in Mr. Gray’s death, took office only four months ago, elected with the backing of community activists.
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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, May 3, 6:32 PM
Hopefully, she will remain unbiased and truly bring justice where it needs to be. That said, I- knowing still very little about the legal process- am surprised she is pulling out criminal charges this early. Like the guy said in the article, though: It is easy to charge and hard to convict.
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We Know What Killed Freddie Gray

We Know What Killed Freddie Gray | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
But if the problem of police violence is, in part, a problem of accountability, then the charges are important, regardless of what comes next.
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Freddie Gray Death: Prosecutor Mosby Lays Out Chain of Events During Arrest

Freddie Gray Death: Prosecutor Mosby Lays Out Chain of Events During Arrest | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Baltimore officers who arrested Freddie Gray have been charged with conduct so "grossly negligent" that it put him in a coma — leading to his d...
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School Expulsions: Black students expelled two to five times as often as White students

School Expulsions: Black students expelled two to five times as often as White students | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

By Donna St. George,

Published: December 28

 

Across the Washington area, black students are suspended and expelled two to five times as often as white students, creating disparities in discipline that experts say reflect a growing national problem.

 

An analysis by The Washington Post shows the phenomenon both in the suburbs and in the city, from the far reaches of Southern Maryland to the subdivisions of Fairfax, Prince George’s and Montgomery counties.

 

Last year, for example, one in seven black students in St. Mary’s County were suspended from school, compared with one in 20 white students. In Alexandria, black students were nearly six times as likely to be suspended as their white peers.

 

The problems extend beyond the Washington area to school districts across the country and are among a host of concerns about school discipline that sparked a joint effort by the U.S. Justice and Education departments in July to look into reforms.

 

Contributing Factors

 

Experts say disparities appear to have complex causes. A disproportionate number of black students live below the poverty line or with a single parent, factors that affect disciplinary patterns. But experts say those factors do not fully explain racial differences in suspensions. Other contributing factors could include unintended bias, unequal access to highly effective teachers and differences in school leadership styles.

 

Closing the Gap

 

In the Washington region, many school leaders said they are increasingly focused on the problem and grappling with ways to close the gap.

 

In Montgomery, Deputy Superintendent Frieda K. Lacey said the district has trained principals and administrators in new approaches, which include involving a team of administrators in suspension decisions.

 

Still, she said, much remains to be done. Nearly 6 percent of black students were suspended or expelled from school last year, compared with 1.2 percent of white students. The gap remains even as suspensions are down since 2006 across all racial groups.

 

She pointed to one unsettling statistic: 71 percent of suspensions for insubordination, a relatively rare offense in the county, were handed out to black students. African Americans make up 21 percent of students in Montgomery’s schools

 

Strategy

 

1. dig deeper into the data

2. offer more professional development

3. share best practices

 

The Post’s analysis found that in the Washington suburbs alone, more than 35,000 students were suspended or expelled from school at some point last school year — more than half of them black students.

 

In interviews, many school officials noted successes in reducing overall suspensions during the past several years and cited cultural-sensitivity training and positive-behavior initiatives that are more proactive about discipline.

 

Subjective Nature of the Offenses

 

But along with the issue of disparities in many school systems is increasing concern about the subjective nature of many offenses.

 

In Maryland and Virginia, as in many other places, one of the most common causes of student suspensions are what many call “soft” — or discretionary — infractions: disrespect, defiance, insubordination, disruption and foul language.

 

Fairfax Deputy Superintendent Richard Moniuszko said the county recently began probing disparities to determine which schools and offenses produce the greatest gaps. Some offenses, he said, allow educators significant latitude in how they respond.

 

Suspensions have surged nationally since the 1970s, fueled in part by a zero-tolerance culture. As suspensions ticked up, racial disparities widened between blacks and whites — and, to a lesser extent, Hispanics and whites.

 

National Figures

 

The most recent national figures, from 2006, show that 5 percent of white students are suspended, compared with 15 percent of their black classmates, 7 percent of Hispanics and 3 percent of Asians.

 

“We associate getting kicked out of school with something really really bad, but there has been a sea change in recent years in what kids get suspended for and how often we use suspension,” said researcher Daniel J. Losen, who recently authored a report on suspension and disparities for the National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado.

 

 

Research on Risk Factors

 

The stakes are high for those who get booted out of school.

 

Out-of-school suspensions mean lost classroom time and, for some, disconnection from school. A recent landmark study of nearly a million Texas children showed that suspension increased the likelihood of repeating a grade that year and landing in the juvenile-justice system the next year. It also was linked to dropping out.

 

In that research, African American students were more likely to be suspended for discretionary offenses and less likely than whites to be suspended for severe violations, such as selling drugs or bringing a gun to school.

 

“If they are not involved with the more-serious offenses as often as whites are, what’s going on with those discretionary offenses?” said study co-author Michael Thompson, of the Council of State Governments Justice Center.

 

Experts say disparities arise from an array of issues.

They may be driven by unconscious bias or unequal access to teachers who do better engaging students in learning and managing behavior problems when they occur. The leaders of a school system — or of an individual school — strongly influence how often suspensions are meted out.

 

Veteran Principal

 

Mike Durso, a principal for 32 years in Montgomery, Arlington and the District who is now on Montgomery’s Board of Education, said every school has some teachers who make more discipline referrals than others. “I really think it goes back to the training and expertise of teachers and the approach of the school administration,” he said.

 

Disparities are common in both suburban and urban districts, although urban schools tend to use suspension more, experts say.

 

Is poverty a contributing factor?

 

An increasing number of studies have looked into whether poverty, family background or other characteristics explain racial disparities, said researcher Russell Skiba of Indiana University.

“It is not just a matter of kids coming from poverty,” Skiba said. “Poor kids do get suspended more. But that does not explain why poor black kids get suspended more than poor white kids and why affluent black kids get suspended more than affluent white kids.”

 

Database editor Dan Keating and staff writer David S. Fallis contributed to this report.


Via Mel Riddile, Dorothy Retha Cook
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Victims of prosecutorial misconduct press for watchdog

Victims of prosecutorial misconduct press for watchdog | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A group of New Yorkers who collectively lost decades in prison for crimes they didn't commit came to the Capitol on Wednesday in support of legislation that would create a panel charged with invest...

Via Concerned Citizen
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In Baltimore, We’re All Freddie Gray - NYTimes.com

In Baltimore, We’re All Freddie Gray - NYTimes.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
But it’s not only about Freddie Gray. Like him, I grew up in Baltimore, and I and everyone I know have similar stories, even if they happened to end a little differently. To us, the Baltimore Police Department is a group of terrorists, funded by our tax dollars, who beat on people in our community daily, almost never having to explain or pay for their actions. It’s gotten to the point that we don’t call cops unless we need a police report for an insurance claim.
Rob Duke's insight:

Gangs begin to take on the protection duties that cops are no longer trusted to take.  I'm not arguing whether it's right or wrong, but this article shows the perceptions of the people who live in areas with a department that is "tough" first and answers to the people second, if at all....

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