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4 firefighters shot, 2 killed at Webster, N.Y. fire

4 firefighters shot, 2 killed at Webster, N.Y. fire | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
At least one firefighters was shot and injured while responding to a house fire in the Rochester suburb of Webster, N. Y.
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Crooked Cop Let Woman Off In Exchange For Oral Sex: Police

Crooked Cop Let Woman Off In Exchange For Oral Sex: Police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Florida sheriff's deputy faces felony charges after officials said he accepted oral sex from a woman in exchange for not arresting her.

Ted Arboleda, 32, was arrested Monday. He is charged with unlawful compensation or reward for official behav...
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Buffalo police officer fired for allegedly threatening to kill woman - The Buffalo News

Buffalo police officer fired for allegedly threatening to kill woman  - The Buffalo News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Buffalo Police Officer Ann Vanyo, while on duty about two years ago, allegedly threatened to kill a woman she thought was making moves on her boyfriend, who is also a Buffalo police officer.An independent hearing officer who presided over the 42-year-old Vanyo’s July 23 disciplinary... - The Buffalo News
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Here's a soap opera tale that will illustrate some of the problems with big city policing....

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That’s me in the picture: Kevin Berthia on the Golden Gate bridge

That’s me in the picture: Kevin Berthia on the Golden Gate bridge | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Each week, we reveal the story behind an iconic image
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You never know...the impact...

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Rich Guys Try To Kick Poor Kids Off Their Own Playing Field, Get A Life Lesson Instead (VIDEO)

Rich Guys Try To Kick Poor Kids Off Their Own Playing Field, Get A Life Lesson Instead (VIDEO) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
This is what happened when a group of wealthy, white tech workers in San Francisco attempted to kick a group of local kids off their playing field -- they got a life lesson they'll never forget.
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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, October 16, 2:31 AM
I feel that this is ridiculous that people think they can do anything if they have money. Those guys just thought they can do anything they want and abuse their power. Hold on a second. They don’t even have such a power to act like that in the shared-public space, where everyone is welcome. Also, I am a sportsman myself, and I never saw or had such an issue. Usually people are only happy if you will join their team, or will play with them. I think it is totally the problem of rich folks who is trying to show off.
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City Leaders Say Police Unions Have Obstructed Stop-And-Frisk Reform

NEW YORK -- It’s a story Nicholas Peart has told many times. On his 18th birthday, he walked to a Brooklyn McDonald’s with his cousin and a friend. The McDonald’s was closed, so the trio sat down on a nearby bench and shot the breez...
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Ricky Osborne's comment, October 15, 8:49 PM
The contentious stop and frisk policy of the NYPD is in the spotlight once again. This policy needs to be removed as it violates the rights of minorities across the city, especially those of Latino or black descent. I could not envision myself living in a place that allows officers to stop me with no justification and search me. There have got to be better methods of policing and protecting the public than those that violate the civil rights of citizens who live in a country that prides itself on freedom. The stop and frisk policy is an illegal one and should be disbanded immediately.
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10 Shocking Reasons to End the Drug War (And Consider Legalization and Regulation)

10 Shocking Reasons to End the Drug War (And Consider Legalization and Regulation) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
This is not your ordinary Top 10 Buzzfeed list. Law Enforcement Against Prohibition , a group of law enforcement officials opposed to the war on drugs, created this list to show why the War on Drug...
Rob Duke's insight:

What a great quote in the comments: "you can get over addiction, but not a conviction".

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Jennifer Slingerland's comment, October 15, 6:07 PM
I think one of the most intriguing and infuriating sections is where they talk about asset forfeiture. If anyone here watches Last Night Tonight on HBO, there's a great segment explaining the process of how the police obtain the money (http://youtu.be/3kEpZWGgJks). I hadn't thought much of it until this segment, at which point I realized exactly what my coworkers in charge of civil asset forfeiture were managing. Even though most of the people involved are cleared of any charges (usually drug-related), their items are held and used by the county sheriff's offices to fund miscellaneous expenditures. It's appalling to believe that your property is guilty until proven innocent. Talk about incorrectly prioritizing in order to fight the drug war.
Rodney Ebersole's comment, October 15, 6:21 PM
Interesting article that shed light on what the government and police force is doing to try and deal with the drug ward and why it isn't working. I think the drug issue is a very difficult one to fix, some minor drugs really don't cause many issues but they are still treated as if they will turn the user into a monster who eats people. Yes, highly addictive drugs cause all sorts of problems but even heroin users who are only hurting themselves don't need to be thrown in jail for twenty years. If getting them clean is the best answer then why aren't drug users being put in treatment facilities or given cars with breathalyzers installed to detect drug use like DUI criminals are? It seems like the current system is designed to make the most money and not to actually fix the problem.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 17, 2:56 AM
The statistics in this article are sad but true. The war on drugs is not working and something needs to be fixed. Incarceration is no longer the answer to drug crimes. Also it pointed out the fact that the government makes profit out of seizing property. I think that if someone has not been charged with the crime than the goods should be given back to the owner. I was watching a documentary on glass blowers who made pipes for smokers. They were busted by the DEA and they seized thousands of dollars, and other items which were never returned. The makers of the glass never supplied or sold drugs but still had to pay for it due to the war on drugs. The mexican cartels also survive on the black-market drug trade in the US decriminalizing it may help lower this crime. However if you make more drugs legal, we need more rehabilitation clinics for the people who have drug addiction disease. They need proper resources to cope and keep clean.
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Hundreds of HK police use sledgehammers and chainsaws to dismantle protest barriers

Hundreds of HK police use sledgehammers and chainsaws to dismantle protest barriers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hundreds of Hong Kong police used sledgehammers and chainsaws to dismantle pro-democracy barricades near government offices and the city's financial center on Tuesday, a day after
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Niki Wilson's comment, October 15, 4:05 AM
By now the entire world should be aware of the fact that police using forceful methods as a means of protestor control never really works out. More often than not it provokes the protestors even more. These people fighting against the government have adopted an interesting way of doing so and the police selectively taking down barriers and allowing protestors to stay is a much better means of control.
Jennifer Slingerland's comment, October 15, 6:15 PM
The amount of brutality that the police are showing these protesters is astounding, though not unheard of. At the end of the day, I do believe that they have a job to do, and that's to simply clear the streets to get Hong Kong in order again. Tearing down protester-erected barriers honestly doesn't seem like that big of a deal. If it's blocking traffic of any kind, it shouldn't be there in the first place. Does that justify the way the police are confronting the protesters beyond the barriers? Absolutely not. But hopefully those protesting will listen and begin to make compromises in order to effectively demonstrate their opinions. It's hardly fair to anyone having to commute to work, hospital, or school to have to wait around so long because the protesters won't listen and get out of the way of traffic.
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How Eyewitness IDs Lead to Wrongful Convictions and Calls for New Methods

How Eyewitness IDs Lead to Wrongful Convictions and Calls for New Methods | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
On Friday, Brandon Olebar was awarded nearly half a million dollars after spending 10 years in prison for a crime he did not commit. The

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Ricky Osborne's comment, October 15, 8:43 PM
I still think the use of eyewitness accounts are an important aspect in convicting criminals. It is rare instances such as this one that show that all systems are not perfect. When the human factor is placed into such a system, it opens the door for infallibility to occur. This is due to the simple fact that humans are not perfect. We make mistakes and in this case a major one.
Zach Bohan's comment, October 16, 8:41 PM
It is crazy to think that something so simple, something so believable as an ee witness account can go so awry. People's memories are a constantly changing environment that have no credibility in the long term, let alone in the stressful short term. When people are put into a lineup it is often with people who look so similar that it leaves room for major error. Without definitive descriptors, such as tattoos, eye witness accounts are flimsy at best.
Brandon Jensen's comment, October 17, 1:33 AM
The human mind can be really awesome but really forgetful sometimes, and for some people it can be devastating for their life when they get wrongly convicted. However, I would also agree that eyewitness accounts can be helpful a lot of the time and therefore should still be used.
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The Theory of Blue Ocean Leadership - Blue Ocean Strategy

The Theory of Blue Ocean Leadership - Blue Ocean Strategy | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 17, 3:07 AM
This is an interesting perspective on leadership, I have to say I can agree with some of the statements. As a leader you must be supported, without that support or buying in you loose the people that you need to make the organization work. However how much does a company like this charge to help with leadership. The leaders can take a seminar like this, but do they really learn and take value from it, or only do it because they are told by their bosses and then the cycle continues?

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St. Louis sit-in busted by cops

St. Louis sit-in busted by cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
More than 100 protesters staged a sit-in at the foot of a convenience store Saturday night.
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Rob Duke's comment, October 13, 1:25 PM
I don't know anyone from Ferguson (St. Louis, Mo), so I can't say that this is what has happened there, but I can comment on the things that were happening in L.A. before the Rodney King incident. In the years just before 1991 when Mr. King was beaten, we had seen the emergence of the Crips and the Bloods street gangs; the prevalence of drug dealing gang members, complete with retaliatory drive by shootings. We also saw a new trend in gangs where outside sources (e.g. cartels and prison gangs) stepped in to give orders to the kids making up the gang on the streets. These outsiders upset past practice by ordering their young members, or soldiers, to carry out attacks on rivals and on the police. As this cycle of violence spun up, the cops were attacked (felonious assaults on officers increased 150% during the 1980's) and officers began to meet increased force with force. I'm not arguing that it's right, but the old saying is that sometimes you can't see the forest for the trees. When you're too close to the problem, you can't see it. That was our story in the early 1990's in L.A. and my guess is that something similar is afoot in the St. Louis area.
Niki Wilson's comment, October 15, 4:45 AM
I think that the issue here is that the people see the police as the enemy rather than the protector. A community should always have the right to protest if there is injustice around the corner. The way the situation is being handled isn't the best in my opinion but you can't understand the situation unless you're in it.
Sarah O'Leary's comment, October 16, 2:07 AM
I agree Niki. The community has been pitted against the police based on media fed frenzy, assumptions, rumors, and years of perceived racial profiling. I also agree with you, Rob and think perspective is important when it comes to community wide dissent. Up here in Alaska and apart from the situation, it is easy to see the story from both sides as it comes out and think the situation would be the opposite if we lived nearby or were affected by these incidents.
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Edward Snowden’s Privacy Tips: “Get Rid Of Dropbox,” Avoid Facebook And Google | TechCrunch

Edward Snowden’s Privacy Tips: “Get Rid Of Dropbox,” Avoid Facebook And Google | TechCrunch | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
for
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The Micromanager in Chief

The Micromanager in Chief | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
How Syria overwhelmed an overcentralized White House
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's another paradox of power and leadership: if you micro-manage, then everyone waits for your orders--even when waiting means failures or missed opportunities.

 

So, we delegate and allow folks to enlarge their own areas of responsibility, but this sometimes results in problems.

 

How do you find balance?  Do you "trust but verify"?  Do you do "management by walking around"?

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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, October 14, 5:39 PM

I like the title of this article, "The Micromanager in Chief."  Obama has made a lot of mistakes and placing our country in harms way with all aspects of his choices and this is my strong opinion. Another article I read is Obama refers ISIS as ISIL which defines the jurisdiction between Israel and these other parts of extremists. It shows his open lack of acknowledgement of Israel being a sovereign country. In my opinion Obama seems to have a soft spot for the Middle East. I'm happy to see Hillary is finally not being a supporter of Obama and she is now recognizing the mistakes that are being done as well as she is a Democrat standing up for what should be done for our country in dealing with delicate issues like this. Obama doesn't listen to the advice from the people who actually know what they are doing because they have been doing this much longer than him as well as they have much more experience.

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Oath Upheld: Nashville Cops Refused Secret Service Request for Illegal Search of Obama Critic

Following Secret Service Director Julia Pierson's recent resignation over a major security breach at the White House, new allegations are facing the president'
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Where pot is legal: Seattle cannabis edibles company hopes to bring product line to Alaska

Where pot is legal: Seattle cannabis edibles company hopes to bring product line to Alaska | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Brothers Patrick, Dan and Michael Devlin are hoping to stake their claim in Washington’s “Green Rush” as entrepreneurs scramble to cash in on the newly legalized marijuana market. The company’s Zoots product line will be some of the first edibles sold. 
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The nurse who broke protocol~

The nurse who broke protocol~ | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
And here you will read the true story of a nurse who broke protocol. I held the bloody hand of an HIV+ patient without gloving. About three weeks ago. I was walking down the hallway when I heard ye...
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Wouldn't it be nice, if police culture was just like this....I'd argue that it is, but that we have a tainted profession like a dentist where the help we give is often accompanied by pain (not from us, but easy enough to associate with us)....

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How to (Gradually) Become a Different Company

How to (Gradually) Become a Different Company | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Five tips for shifting your core business.
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If we recognize all the organizational, societal, and institutional forces that influence police problems like abuse and corruption; we will realize that we need to know how to change organizations and how to lead change.

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Private Donors Supply Spy Gear to Cops

Private Donors Supply Spy Gear to Cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
There's little public scrutiny when private donors pay to give police controversial technology and weapons. Sometimes, companies are donors to the same foundations that purchase their products for police.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Rob Duke's insight:

Hmmm...is this because the rich want the police to patrol the boundaries of society?

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Jennifer Slingerland's comment, October 15, 6:22 PM
It's really unfortunate to see these sort of closeted deals going on, but I have to wonder if the system isn't broken beyond repair at this point. It's much like the way lobbyists treat government officials - you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours. It's horrible, it's shady, and it's worthy of the scrutiny it deserves. However, this is the first I'd ever heard of it, and I'm sure there are many others who are in the dark about it as well. How often do you find yourself wondering 'hm, I wonder who's donating to the police foundation in my area today, and how they're allocating the grants they receive?' Chances are, very few people do think about this. Hopefully it becomes more widespread in order to begin allowing scrutiny to analyse these types of deals. Ridiculous.
Sarah O'Leary's comment, October 16, 1:56 AM
This is more a form of socially biased justice than the fronted "financially enhanced justice." If the rich and private companies are able to contribute in ways such as this, it is the same as corrupt political influence. It is shocking to see that this type of corruption has such a widespread back door.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 17, 2:38 AM
“But critics say police foundations operate with little transparency or oversight and can be a way for wealthy donors and corporations to influence law enforcement agencies' priorities”. After reading the article and reading that sentence I really think that is what it is all about. There is also a big conflict of interest but no one seems to care because it did not come from public funding. It would be great if this equipment was donated with no private agenda and they were not pressured by outside parties. However I don't think this is the case and the equipment still comes with a large price tag to the department.
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Yes, It's Legal To Film The Cops -- And What's Been Filmed In Recent Months Is Appalling

Yes, It's Legal To Film The Cops -- And What's Been Filmed In Recent Months Is Appalling | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
NEW YORK -- It's becoming clearer and clearer that smartphones have ushered in a new era of police accountability. Since mid-July, when a bystander on Staten Island filmed the death of Eric Garner in a prohibited police chokehold, at least eight othe...

Via Darcy Delaproser
Rob Duke's insight:

Yes, it's legal, but stay out of the way and stay out of the line of fire...that's some of what cops get annoyed about...even the ones that agree that you have a right to digitally record them.

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Sarah O'Leary's comment, October 16, 2:03 AM
To me, it seems the people who are MOST concerned with taking these videos of these interactions, have something to hide OR are already pre-disposed to not trust cops or are trying to find them fail. Now even though this is a generalization, I understand this does not cover all aspects. These videos don't either. They don't show anything leading up to the altercations, they don't show these peoples pasts or even their intentions. What if the tables were turned and the outcome was different and the man had gotten ahold of a cop and killed him instead. Then how would it be any different. We can not simply say they deserve it because they were resisting, however, by submitting to police and cooperating, there would be less chance of injury.
Zach Bohan's comment, October 16, 8:31 PM
Police may not want to be video taped because it could limit what is necessary to do for the enforcement of the law. However, it is obviously necessary that police need monitoring. This is just one of man examples of power being given to those who cannot properly wield it. Police have to held accountable for their choices. They may have to get physical occasionally with worse people for information in order to protect the greater good and would not be able to if they are being filmed. However, because they can't control themselves in simple situations, video accountability is a must.
Brandon Jensen's comment, October 17, 1:26 AM
I do believe that some sort of police monitoring may be necessary in some places but it has to be done right. Of course in some of these videos we can not see what has happened from the beginning so we could only be getting half the story so there is that to take into account. Many other situations however, I notice that there are things that the cops do to people that is excessive so I am leaning a bit more towards monitoring of cops when it comes to certain places.
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Key Differences from Conventional Leadership Approaches - Blue Ocean Strategy

Key Differences from Conventional Leadership Approaches - Blue Ocean Strategy | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
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Cops under investigation after hitting unarmed teen with gun

Cops under investigation after hitting unarmed teen with gun | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A pair of NYPD cops chased down a teen and hit him in the face with a gun -- even after he stopped running and raised his hands -- prompting a criminal probe into the incident, according to law-enf...
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Several hits after he's handcuffed, too....

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Zach Bohan's comment, October 16, 8:37 PM
It seems that often police officers, in the heat of the moment, do not consider themselves to be accountable for the actions taken in their enforcement of the law. There was no reason in the article for the police to strike a criminal they had chased down and who had surrendered. These situations are exactly why police need cameras on them at all time. Without them, police do not fear the consequences of going too far. This ca often lead to police officers becoming worse criminals than the person they are attempting to arrest, which begs the question: why weren't these police immediately arrested?
Brandon Jensen's comment, October 17, 1:18 AM
I feel like every couple of months or so I hear this same story but in a different city pop up in the news, a cop hits an unarmed person when it's clear the other person has given in. I do agree that this was a mistake made by the cops and it is very unfortunate, even hitting him after the kid was handcuffed, that is pretty lame. It was clear the kid was giving up but they decided to hit him anyway, bad judgment call. Of course all cops are not like this but we do start to see stories like this pop up more and more these days.
Rachael Toy's comment, October 18, 3:43 AM
This is pretty disgusting to watch. It is one thing to respond that way when someone is resisting but other than running away at first, this kid never resisted. They treated him with complete malleus. This is exactly what people think of when the topic of power and police come up. Despite all the good cops do for us, we always go back to the times that cops did things like this. It is sad because it is just the realization that we are all human and no matter what our “profession” is, not everyone will do it well. There are always a few rotten apples in the bushel. What was sad was the fact that the cop continued not only after he was “taken down” but also after he was handcuffed; where he was no threat at all. They showed complete hatred. Makes me wonder what they were thinking that lead them to their actions in the first place. Sadly, this kid will also be left with a sour taste about cops. I don’t think I could look at them the same if I was ever treated that way.
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What I Saw as an N.F.L. Ball Boy

Games spent gathering helmet fragments and supplying smelling salts.
Rob Duke's insight:

No repeated head injuries, and the feces in the shorts is from close calls not particularly hard hits, but there's some similarities in this NFL locker room and sideline expose' to cop work.  We can't become apologists for the bad behavior of the police, but we can demand better resources for those problems that we do know how to deal with....

Peer counseling (with confidentiality and privileged communication for peer counselors); domestic violence programs that are not a career-ending death sentence; alcohol programs that are not a similar career-death sentence (cops won't participate if it leads to the end of their career); team counseling that helps reduce the stigma of using these services (it's a warrior culture and seeming weak is bad with a capital "B"); suicide prevention (peer counseling, but also professionals like the Counseling Team in San Bernardino).  What have I missed?

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Navajo police officer stable after being shot in the head

The family of a Navajo Nation police officer is asking for prayers tonight after he was shot in the head this morning, in the line of duty. Family members say Officer Joseph Gregg was alone when he responded to a domestic violence call in the Northern Arizona town of Kaibeto, which is roughly 150 miles north of Flagstaff on the Navajo Indian Reservation.Officer Joseph Gregg has been with the Navajo Nation Police Department for 5 years. Navajo Nation officials say he was shot in the head with ...
Rob Duke's insight:

We see a lot of coverage on police abuse, but we often forget that it seems to be getting more dangerous to be a cop....

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