Police Problems and Policy
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Foreigner cries rape by two cops - The Star Online

Foreigner cries rape by two cops - The Star Online | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Foreigner cries rape by two copsThe Star OnlineGEORGE TOWN: An Indonesian has claimed that she was raped by two policemen inside a patrol car in Bukit Tengah near Bukit Mertajam, but her allegation was strenuously denied by the state police chief.
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Louisiana governor signs 'blue lives matter' bill

Louisiana governor signs 'blue lives matter' bill | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards signs a bill expanding the state's hate-crimes statute to add the targeting of police officers, firefighters and EMS personnel.
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'Daddy, don't be a police officer anymore' - Worcester Mag

'Daddy, don't be a police officer anymore' - Worcester Mag | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
What many have been wondering and asking is: “Who was the little boy?” and “Was he Tarentino’s son?”

Worcester Magazine has since learned the back story, and it is gut-wrenching.

No, the boy is not Tarentino’s son. According to Auburn Police Chief Andrew Sluckis, young Camden is the son of the police officer hugging in him in the photo, longtime Auburn Officer Keith Chipman.

The boy, Sluckis said, had just realized why he was there and that Tarentino had been killed. The boy and his father had been friends with Tarentino. The boy ran to his father, and as he hugged him, Camden pleaded with his father, “Daddy, please don’t be a police officer anymore.”
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Teen with replica gun shot by Santa Rosa police after calling 911

Teen with replica gun shot by Santa Rosa police after calling 911 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

 A 15-year-old boy carrying a replica pistol was shot and wounded in a park by a Santa Rosa police officer late Monday in what authorities are saying was an attempted suicide-by-cop.

In a statement posted to Facebook, police officials say the boy called 911 about 11:30 p.m. to report a man armed with a gun in Coffey Park in the northwest part of town.

The caller described the gunman’s black sweat shirt and dark jeans and said he was standing with a handgun under a street light at the park’s edge.

"This kid tragically orchestrated this on his own," said Lt. Michael Lazzarini. "He described himself and waited for the cops to show up."

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Full transcript: Judge Williams' ruling acquitting Officer Nero in Freddie Gray case

Full transcript: Judge Williams' ruling acquitting Officer Nero in Freddie Gray case | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Circuit Judge Barry G. Williams acquitted Officer Edward Nero on Monday of all four charges against him in connection with the arrest of Freddie Gray. Below are his full comments from the bench, as transcribed by The Baltimore Sun.
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Freddie Gray Arresting Officer Edward Nero Found Not Guilty On All Charges

Freddie Gray Arresting Officer Edward Nero Found Not Guilty On All Charges | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Nero waived his right to a trial by jury. His bench trial began May 12 and final arguments were heard Thursday.

WJZ’s Ron Matz says the verdict announcement was attended by a group of Baltimore City police officers, most in plain clothes. After the verdict was read, they came up to Nero one by one, embracing him and patting him on the back. Nero was seen with tears in his eyes.
Rob Duke's insight:
Cops and attorneys know the general rule: if guilty, ask for a jury.  If innocent, ask for a bench trial.  Jury's can get things wrong, but a judge will rarely do so.
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How Can You Trust the Judgment of a Police Commission That Applies the Wrong Legal Standard?

How Can You Trust the Judgment of a Police Commission That Applies the Wrong Legal Standard? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
As taken from the Commission report, the facts surrounding the shooting are as follows: The officer attempted to detain Ford, suspecting he had possession of narcotics. Ford turned suddenly when the officer reached him, and tackled the officer to the ground. Ford then tried to take the officer’s gun—as evidenced by Ford’s DNA on the top and body of the officer’s holster. The partner officer shot Ford twice with no effect. With Ford still on top of the officer and trying to take his gun, the officer pulled out his backup gun and shot Ford once in the abdomen, causing Ford to go limp and allowing the officer to get out from under Ford.

The Commission used a “totality of the circumstances” review in deciding if the shooting was in policy, but went off the rails by using the wrong legal standard to guide its review. The Commission applied a holding in Hayes v. County of San Diego, a Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals case that ruled that a deputy sheriff’s “tactical conduct and decisions preceding the use of deadly force were relevant considerations under California law in determining whether the use of deadly force gave rise to negligence liability.” (Emphasis added)

Hayes was incorrectly applied in this instance because the Commission concluded that the initial detention of Ford was “unjustified,” not that it was negligent. According to the Commission, “The legally inappropriate detention of the subject that led to the subsequent altercation rendered the use of deadly force unreasonable and out of policy.”

An “inappropriate detention” is a Fourth Amendment issue, not an issue of negligence as in Hayes, and the misapplication of Hayes to Fourth Amendment issues resulted in the Commission’s absurd “out of policy” decision.

If an “unreasonable detention” was the issue, the Commission’s review should have been guided by Fourth Amendment cases, not a single case involving “negligence.” For instance, in Billington v. Smith, a prior Ninth Circuit case, the court ruled that, under federal law (including the Fourth Amendment), an officer’s negligent act that provokes a violent response “will not transform an otherwise reasonable subsequent use of force into a Fourth Amendment violation.” This was reiterated in another Ninth Circuit case, Sheehan v. City and County of San Francisco, where the court ruled that only when an officer intentionally and recklessly provokes a violent confrontation he or she is liable for the otherwise defensive use of deadly force.

What is a “reasonable use of force?” The United States Supreme Court has determined “‘reasonableness” of a particular use of force must be judged from the perspective of a reasonable officer on the scene, rather than with the 20/20 vision of hindsight.”

Applying the correct law, the shooting of Ford could have only been found “out of policy” if the detention of Ford was so unlawful and reckless that it provoked a violent confrontation. The Commission did not and could not make that finding. Even the Commission acknowledged that Ford turned suddenly and attacked the officer. The detention was not as unlawful and reckless as to provoke violence by Ford. Shooting Ford, who continued to try to take the officer’s gun even after being shot twice, was a reasonable use of force.

Equally disturbing is the Commission’s failure to follow relevant California law that holds that even if an officer makes an illegal detention, a suspect doesn’t have a free pass to try to injure or kill the officer. In the case of In Re: Richard G., a California Court wrote that it would “not immunize crimes of violence committed on a peace officer, even if they are preceded by a Fourth Amendment violation.”
Rob Duke's insight:
Here's the analysis on the inappropriate legal standards used by the L.A. police commission.
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F.B.I. Director Says ‘Viral Video Effect’ Blunts Police Work

F.B.I. Director Says ‘Viral Video Effect’ Blunts Police Work | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
James Comey said he believed that “lots and lots of officers” were not engaging in confrontations with suspects out of fear of being videotaped.
Rob Duke's insight:
FBI Director, James Comey has been making statements that don't align with the administration's policies towards the police....
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Laura Henriquez's comment, May 24, 6:48 PM
I enjoyed reading this article because the statements made by James Comey who is the Director of the F.B.I are right on point. Police officers are under a lot of pressure nowadays because of cases like the one of Michael Brown who was shot by a police officer in the city of Ferguson, there is no doubt in my mind that nowadays police officers may feel the need to avoid certain stops because they are afraid of ending up in a video in YouTube being accused of police brutality. I also loved the fact that Mr. Comey mentioned the non-existent friendly relationship between the police and people of African America descend and other minorities because so much bias exists towards them in our society, I find it extremely frustrating that there is barely any data to support his statements and our government needs to put more effort into finding valid statistics and research to create a solution to the problem. As a future police officer is very sad to feel like I have to be limited on doing my job because I have to watch my back on not ending up in a video on YouTube.
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Chicago Police Street Stops Decrease Dramatically Amid Sinking Morale

"I've never seen morale this bad in my career," the police union boss said.
Rob Duke's insight:
"Nihil sub sole novum", or nothing under the sun is new.  Here's a 1974 song about the capone era of the Chicago crime scene: https://youtu.be/47Ad9_IYqlw
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David Banner 'Black Fist' : for discussion on this video visit www.facebook.com/streetsurvival

rapper video of officer torture and murder, anti-cop hanging, kidnap, freedom fighters, violent
Rob Duke's insight:
Art or Crime?  See Schenck v. U.S. (1919).  You wouldn't be allowed to yell "fire" in a crowded theater--is this getting close to that line?
There's a reason he takes 21 seconds at the beginning of the video to stress that "he" doesn't condone violence. What he gives with one hand, he then takes away for the next four minutes.....
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Laura Henriquez's comment, May 24, 7:02 PM
“The intention of this visual is not to promote violence, but to show that we as a people will no longer accept the loss of innocent black lives,”. The quote stated by Mr. Banner before his video started was definitely not showcased on his actual video, violence was all over the video when the first thing you see is a white male police officer being abducted from his home to then be essentially tortured by a number of African American individuals. In my mind there is no doubt that we have a serious problem when it comes to policing and members of minorities groups because of the stigmas and bias attached to us, I feel extremely close and personal to this topic because I get to see how alive racism still is in Anchorage specifically. The problem between police officers and minority members is one that will remain for decades to come because to have change we must be the change, we must educate our future generations better in order to eliminate the existing stigmas that our society has against people of color and members of other minority groups. All in all even though Mr. Banner may have not meant any harm his video is sending out the wrong message to our youth, violence does not condone violence and even sometimes we do not always agree with the decisions of our courts we must respect and obey them.
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Once-sedate L.A. Police Commission meetings upended by protesters set on disrupting business as usual

Once-sedate L.A. Police Commission meetings upended by protesters set on disrupting business as usual | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Police Commission meeting had devolved into chaos.
Rob Duke's insight:
1. Have an agenda; 2. Only the Chair and the Chief of Staff have the authority to set the agenda; 3. Have clear rules of order;
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The Many Scandals of Police Chief Greg Suhr

The Many Scandals of Police Chief Greg Suhr | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The amount of shit that has rolled off San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr's back would have buried many a less well-connected and les
Rob Duke's insight:
Here's an editorial from last year that shows the unreasonableness and disrespect heaped upon the modern big city police chief.  See near the end where a gun stolen from a car isn't found soon enough and is later used in a murder--Tragedy? Yes.  Evidence of incompetent policing? Hardly.
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Wag the Dog: Cops Are Out of Control!! - Calibre Press

Wag the Dog: Cops Are Out of Control!! - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
That’s the almost totally uncontested narrative by everyone from Hillary Clinton to the media outlets and of course the—too many to count—activist groups chanting in the streets, disrupting city council meetings, and sitting in the lobby of police stations: the cops are out of control. And man does it plays well on the tube and …
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Lydia Weiss's comment, May 21, 12:21 AM
There seems to be a lot of "wagging the dog" going on nowadays, in politics, news, many highly viewed and acknowledged mediums of information. I have some friends who, admittedly, cry wolf about the police running rampant, how they're all terrible and awful people, how they're all out to get people if they're not white due to skin tone. It honestly makes me have to bite my tongue, as someone who has worked with police in the past, and hope to do so in the future. So it really makes me appreciate the statistics proving that there is no epidemic, just more noise being made.
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Trump rally: Protester chaos or choreography?

Trump rally: Protester chaos or choreography? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Getting arrested can be a powerful demonstration of commitment, as activists sacrifice their freedom — at least temporarily — for a political stance. While these are real arrests with genuine legal consequences, some are the result of advance negotiations instead of spontaneous action.

Police and protesters often confer before marches and rallies, discussing everything from the time and location of the protest to the expected size of the crowd. At times, they even agree on how and when people will be arrested.

“They come to us and say, ‘These individuals are going to do this, and we understand when they do this you are going to arrest them,’” said San Diego Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman. “A lot of times, they designate a person or persons to be arrested.”

Not everything can be mediated. After Trump spoke in Albuquerque, N.M., on Tuesday, demonstrators hurled rocks at police, flaming T-shirts and bottles at police. At least four people were arrested. Zimmerman stressed that police are determined to prevent similar outbursts in San Diego.
Rob Duke's insight:
This is also my experience.  Waddington also found this in his research.
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5 statements cops should never make on duty

5 statements cops should never make on duty | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Your destiny should be to be a great police officer; think and speak like a true professional and you will be one
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Court probing why cop killer was free

Court probing why cop killer was free | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The state trial court is probing why slain cop killer and convicted cocaine trafficker Jorge Zambrano was free to roam the streets despite repeated
Rob Duke's insight:
To what extent are the courts accountable to the public?  The police certainly are, but the courts are aloof, and for good reason.  The last thing we want to do is mess with judicial independence, but the normal political functions are slow and the courts may "wag the dog" for a time; if not completely change the course of social history (often for the public's own good, see civil rights history).  None-the-less, this can be frustrating to the community and to the law enforcement who feel the brunt of their dissatisfaction.
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Supreme Court Throws Out Death Sentence From All-White Jury

Supreme Court Throws Out Death Sentence From All-White Jury | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The U.S. Supreme Court Monday cleared the way for a new trial for a Georgia man convicted of murder and sentenced to death by an all-white jury, finding that prosecutors intentionally kept blacks off the jury.

“Prosecutors were motivated in substantial part by race,” wrote Chief Justice John Roberts, who was joined in the opinion by all but one of the justices. In his dissent, Clarence Thomas, the court’s only African-American member, said the court did not have jurisdiction to take up the case.
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LAPPL - Los Angeles Police Protective League: Blog

LAPPL - Los Angeles Police Protective League: Blog | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The website of the Los Angeles Police Protective League
Rob Duke's insight:
Some interesting entries from the LAPD Protective League blog.  The one that caught my eye: Police Commission refuses to try the Force Option Training Simulator (FOTS) to see how difficult split second use of force decisions can be.

The FOTS machine projects a series of incidents on an interactive screen that picks up an officers actions (via video tape) and also records reaction time and shot placement if the officer opts to use deadly force.  At the same time, the operator who is a trained rangemaster and use of force expert is able to change the scenario to match the officers actions, over-reactions, and under-reactions.  Furthermore, the operator has a nylon auto cannon that can target officers and "shoot" them with nylon bullets similar in size and shape to a paintball.  We used FOTS quarterly and it's a great tool to use and would have given the commission a balanced view of what use of force is like for the human brain.  Training (10 hours a week for seven months in shooting, and another 10 hours a week in physical defense/de-escalation) can only go so far to overriding the lizard-like hindbrain that is left over from our evolutionary past.  Like it or not, there is some "fight or flight" that takes over without our control for the first few seconds of any life or death fight.  That response served us well in avoiding snakes and outrunning sabertooths, but it's likely to get your modern cop in serious trouble.
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LAPD union president blasts commission ruling on Ezell Ford shooting

LAPD union president blasts commission ruling on Ezell Ford shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Lt. Craig Lally said he had received messages and calls from officers complaining about the commission's determination that the shooting was unjustified even though Ford was wrestling for control of the officer's gun.

"They feel that the Police Commission abandoned them for a suspect who basically tried to take an officer's gun," he said. "They're as flabbergasted as I am."

Lally said the commission's ruling would probably make officers hesitant to patrol proactively. He said the decision, along with the impending department-wide rollout of body cameras, has prompted concerns that officers will be unfairly scrutinized for doing even routine police work.
Rob Duke's insight:
California law must align with Federal Court rulings (Prop. 8 from the early 1980's set aside many of the Rose Byrd Supreme Courts liberal rulings).  This decision by the L.A. police commission attempts to roll back case law and apply inappropriate standards.
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Trying to Hide the Rise of Violent Crime

Trying to Hide the Rise of Violent Crime | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In The Wall Street Journal, Heather Mac Donald writes about efforts by progressives and their media allies to deny the “Ferguson effect” and to hide the rise in violent crime.
Rob Duke's insight:
Simply put: it matters not where you assign the property rights because the market will find the most efficient way to handle any arrangement.  If you give the cops all the property rights to the "use of force", then you get something that looks heavy handed.  In balance, where the courts meter those use of force rights with some due process and reasonableness standard, then you get a pretty fair justice system, but when you give the property rights to the bad guys, then you get death of civil society.  The cops are afraid to work and the bad guys operate with impunity.  (Coase Theorem).
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Minneapolis police officers face accusations of 'slowdown'

Minneapolis police officers face accusations of 'slowdown' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Contentious questions are raised as stop and arrest rates drop dramatically, especially in the Fourth Precinct on the North Side.
Rob Duke's insight:
It's illegal for officers to strike, but staying on the job for emergency coverage while, at the same time, avoiding any proactive work is legal (even if it might get you in trouble with the Sergeant or affect your annual evaluation).  Some officers (and the infection spreads) will begin to say things like: "I'm not going to Federal prison for you ungrateful citizens".  I was guilty of saying exactly these words in the years after the Rodney King trials.  I was an officer in the Los Angeles basin, but you can't stay in contact with victims for long before you begin to hear their pain and tears all too loudly.  For us, the result was a fairly robust community policing where we really listened to community members and they, in turn, took a proactive interest in policing their own communities.  Data based policing also came online during this time (CompStat and ESRI).  Together, crime came down without the need to "bash heads" as much as before.  Then 9/11 came around and we begin to move towards a militarized model of policing.....
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Disturbing Video Shows Suspect Beating Officer

Disturbing Video Shows Suspect Beating Officer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
This is a report of loud music. No call is routine. We lose officers in the line of duty every year with the original call being far less than that.
Rob Duke's insight:
Wait for your back up!
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Laura Henriquez's comment, May 23, 8:21 PM
This video was pretty hard to watch especially since I am planning to become a police officer for The Anchorage Police Department once I graduate this upcoming fall. I completely agree with your standpoint on this article the officer should have waited for back up not matter what and this situation could have been easily avoided. I honestly held my breath for some moments of the video because I though the bad guy was going to shoot and kill the officer, the video is a clear presentation that our officers need better training on how to react to certain situations. I can personally say that the Anchorage Police Department is a true example to follow I have done many ridealongs with them and not matter how simple a call could seem they always show up in pairs and never alone because you never know who is going to answer the door and how they will receive you and must always be ready for the worst.
Rob Duke's comment, May 24, 12:19 AM
Yeah, I was just thinking today that I've been in this situation a thousand times, but 998 of those times, I followed the rules and had the drop on the bad guy. I've looking into those eyes and seen the resolve in their hearts to hurt me, but also seen the flame go out when they realized that I'd hurt them first. And, in the few times when I didn't have the drop, well, I got lucky and those people weren't the predator that this guy obviously proved to be....
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Lucky or Good? - Calibre Press

Lucky or Good? - Calibre Press | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Let’s agree that there will always be predators. Then let’s agree that we need protectors, guardians, and warriors. If we agree, then the problem is simple: Departments need to get their acts together, and officers need to invest more in their fitness and practical tactical skills.
Rob Duke's insight:
....as long as we also agree that not everyone is trying to kill us, so we need to temper our response with reasonableness.
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SF police chief resigns hours after cops kill woman in stolen car

SF police chief resigns hours after cops kill woman in stolen car | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
San Francisco police shot dead a 27-year-old black woman sitting behind the wheel of a stolen car in the Bayview neighborhood.
Rob Duke's insight:
Anyone who says policing isn't political isn't paying attention...
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Merced Police deal with resistive subject

MERCED, CA – A subject riding a bicycle on the sidewalk refused to give his ID after being told he was getting a ticket by a much smaller female polic
Rob Duke's insight:
Give the property rights to the bad guys and this is what happens.  Chaos.
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