Police Problems and Policy
9.4K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Rob Duke
onto Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

France's SNCF to deploy 'polite police' on trains to tackle bad manners - Telegraph.co.uk

France's SNCF to deploy 'polite police' on trains to tackle bad manners - Telegraph.co.uk | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Telegraph.co.ukFrance's SNCF to deploy 'polite police' on trains to tackle bad mannersTelegraph.co.ukUnder draft plans, more serious offenders may also be sent on "citizenship courses" to be taught good manners, while 500 new "politeness mediators"...
more...
Jesse Morris's comment, December 12, 2012 8:24 AM
HAHAHA. Sorry, couldn't help it. But seriously, that is a waste of police resources if i ever heard on one. But on the flip side it might actually produce revenue if there are enough offenders, but i doubt it. Something like this would not happen in an American Sub-way. We are to outspoken and narcissistic to let somethign liek this escalate to that kind of level. The only time the police would intervene is when i fight would break out between a troubled youngster and a man who had a bad day.
Rob Duke's comment, December 13, 2012 3:22 AM
Too funny...almost snorted milk out my nose while reading your comment.
Madeleine M-Stanley's comment, December 14, 2012 5:22 AM
This is very funny. It certainly does not help the reputation of the French for being rude people, that's for sure. I agree with Jesse that this is a unique situation, and would likely not occur here. In my experiences riding the subway in NYC, everyone stayed out of each other's way and generally away from each other all together. Maybe they're having a problem because using public transit is still kind of new for many people there...? The article mentioned they were trying to encourage people to use public transport over their cars, so maybe these people simply don't know how to behave in large groups? Seriously, I don't understand. Sounds like someone rounded up a bunch of angsty teenagers and trapped them in a train...silly!
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

In wake of police shooting, questions raised about body camera footage and officer’s statement

In wake of police shooting, questions raised about body camera footage and officer’s statement | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“It seems to me that they’re just trying to meet the letter of the law … we’re foolin’ the policy but the spirit of it is not what they are following,” said Moore’s lawyer Brian Pearlman, who added that the investigator doesn’t even appear to care what Cha’s statement is.

The recently released body camera footage of the shooting showed an irate and verbally combative Moore. But claims by police that Moore charged the pair of officers are not as clear in the video. In fact, it appears that Cha was moving toward Moore when he fired two shots at a retreating Moore.

The body camera and criminal investigation interview footage was obtained as discovery by the Public Defender’s Office, which is defending Moore for felony assault on an officer, among other charges.

The statement

The interview, which was viewed by the San Francisco Examiner, took place a day after the shooting of Moore in a small room in the Hall of Justice.

Cha sat beside his lawyer as he read the roughly 35-second statement from his phone. In the brief statement, Cha described Moore as “irate” and “aggressive,” and said he charged the pair of officers several times and they responded with pepper spray and a baton. Cha sprayed Moore and his partner on the narrow steps leading to Moore’s home before shooting Moore, who was only recently released from a hospital.

“I shot the suspect two times with my firearm … in order to defend myself and my partner from serious bodily harm,” said Cha at the end of his statement.

The video then shows Cha, three investigators and his lawyer leave the room for more than 20 minutes to review the footage of the shooting, after which Cha was questioned in detail about the incident by San Francisco Homicide Sgt. Thomas Watts.

Policy debate

The department has only been fully equipped with body cameras since late November, but the debate over how officers would be required to use those cameras began long before.

When the body camera policy was finally passed by the Police Commission in June 2016, one of the main issues was when officers would be allowed to view the footage: before or after making a statement to investigators.

On the far side of that debate stood the ACLU, which said officers should make a full statement before being allowed to view the footage, and then make a supplemental statement.

The San Francisco Police Officers Association, on the other hand, argued that officers should be able to view the footage first before making a statement.

Months before its final passage in June, the commission came to a kind of compromise when it voted on a draft policy, which gave the chief the discretion when it came to allowing officers to view the footage before their statement.

But after the meet and confer process with the POA was complete, and the final vote came before the commission in June, the policy had been changed in what some called a compromise and others called a sell-out.

The chief’s discretion had been stripped away and in its place the policy said officers only had to make a brief statement before viewing the footage. The reasoning behind the closed-door alternation was centered on the conundrum of an officer being ordered to make a statement that can be incriminating. If an officer is ordered to make a statement and refuses, that officer can be fired for insubordination.

“I really think it’s a slap in the face to the community,” said Commissioner Petra DeJesus at the June meeting soon after the last-minute changes to the policy were made. DeJesus said the changes seemed like a loophole to get around rules barring the review of footage immediately after a critical incident.

“This is vague. It’s broad. What is this initial statement? I just don’t know what this means. I don’t want to use the word ‘worthless,’” DeJesus said at the time.

At that same meeting, Acting Chief Toney Chaplin attempted to reassure such worries.

“You don’t answer these questions, you won’t see that video,” said Chaplin in a pantomime of what the investigator might say to an officer.

But that didn’t mollify then-Commissioner Victor Hwang, who said while he trusts Chaplin to make sure the process works as he described it, he can’t be sure the next chief will live up to such promises.

“I don’t see there will be back-and-forth questioning,” said Hwang. “I don’t know why the POA gets to change what the commission has decided.”

A Police Department spokesperson said the policy was followed. As part of their statement, the department attached a section of the policy:

“The initial statement by the subject officer shall briefly summarize the actions that the officer was engaged in, the actions that required the use of force, and the officer’s response. The statement shall be distinct from the ‘public safety statement.’ After providing an initial statement, the subject shall have an opportunity to review any audio or video recordings depicting the incident with his or her representative or attorney prior to being subject to an interview.”
Rob Duke's insight:
Well, you see, there are two guys that live in every brain. Most people rarely see this Jekyll and Hyde character of the human brain, but cops see it every day. 

There's the guy in the fore-brain who speaks with a British accent and is the very best representation of a good society and how every decent citizen behaves with his/her fellow human beings.  This guy understands ethics and the rule of law.

Then there's the guy who lives in the hind-brain.  He's the exact opposite of the British accent guy.  He's got more in common with our evolutionary ancestors than we like to admit--in fact, lets just call him the "lizard-guy".  He reacts with fight or flight (and often without much provocation).  Everyone has one of these lizard-guys, but we don't see him much because, frankly, most of us live protected lives. However, I did find a place to witness the lizard guy at work: I was at the Sacramento zoo Sacramento a few years ago and saw a mountain lion attack the "shamoo" glass between it and the crowd.  Grown men ran in fear (one guy gave his kid a perfect Heisman trophy block).  (i'm not judging--the damn cat got me too, which is why I took the time to watch others' temporary terror....).  **See this Youtube for something similar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CNwCJSBLuk

The Heisman guy would probably deny that he chose to save himself over saving his kid.  It wouldn't even be a lie; because, you see, lizard-guy has a very poor memory.  He's not even tied into the same upper level processing as is the English accent guy.  Thus, after a traumatic event, we report not hearing things like gunfire.  We report tunnel vision; and, we can't remember all the details.

Now, ask me to report what happened.  Guess who gives the interview?  Not the lizard guy...he has already crawled back under a rock.  So, English-Accent guy gives his best guess interview.  He makes assumptions: "Well I know the ethical standard is that I may only use force to protect myself or others, so that must have been what happened." And, that's what he says happened: "I felt threatened and thus took the appropriate action." Review the video and again, guess what?  That's not what happened.

Think now about which guy we take out to training....I'd argue that we give lizard-guy lots of training.  He gets 20k rounds of ammunition to train with during the 8 months of academy; and, he gets 100-200 rounds of threat-response training every month.  He gets trained in fighting off aggressors; and, in making physical arrests.  How much training does the English-accent guy get in comparison?

It's a double whammy of biology and training that causes first the action and then the poor-recollection of the action.  Can we do better?  I doubt we'll ever improve officers responses to the point where we have no "bad" shootings...nor will we ever fix the problem of inaccurate statements after trauma.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

President Trump Issues Statement of Support for Law Enforcement

On his first day in office President Donald J. Trump has issued a statement of support for the nation's law enforcement officers on the official White House Website.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

BREAKING: Officer Ambushed, Shot In Back Of Head When He Stopped To Help

BREAKING: Officer Ambushed, Shot In Back Of Head When He Stopped To Help | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Marrero, Louisiana – Westwego Police Officer Michael Louvier was shot in the back of the head when he stopped t
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Litigaphobia Rears Its Ugly Head (Again) - Calibre Press

Back in 1986, three health care professionals combined the terms litigation with phobia to coin the term “litigaphobia.” They came up with the term after researching and interviewing police officers over their fear of being sued. As they applied the term, it pertained to that fear being “so great” among some officers that it became a “preoccupation” that “interfered” with them doing their jobs. Now, 30 years later, the Pew Research Center, a non-partisan fact tank based in Washington, D.C., recently has released a study that seems to confirm that that fear has deepened. In this latest study, they found that 72% of officers are now less willing to stop and question suspicious persons. A whopping 93% are more concerned about their safety than in years past. And 75% are reluctant to use force even when it is appropriate to do so.

While this latest study delved into a whole lot more than just litigaphobia (i.e., police/race relations, force policy and procedure, body cameras, manpower staffing), due to time and space limitations, this short piece will only concern itself with the three issues described above.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Indiana bill would allow police to shut down protests 'by any means necessary'

Indiana bill would allow police to shut down protests 'by any means necessary' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Opponents in Indianapolis argue the proposed law, simply labelled Senate Bill 285, or SB 285, would give police power ‘even to the point of costing lives’
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

NYPD to consider community interaction, rescues in promotions

NYPD to consider community interaction, rescues in promotions | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The NYPD is deploying a promotion system that will emphasize 'qualitative' police activity alongside enforcement numbers, officials said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Little Elm Police Officer Killed on Duty, Suspect Dead

Little Elm Police Officer Killed on Duty, Suspect Dead | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Little Elm police officer died after being shot while responding to a report of an armed man outside a house Tuesday afternoon, and the suspect was later confirmed dead after an hours-long standoff with police.
Little Elm Chief of Police Rodney Harrison said during a news conference Tuesday night that 48-year-old Detective Jerry Walker succumbed to his injuries hours after the shooting.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

'Bad apples' taint Camden County police, civil rights group says

'Bad apples' taint Camden County police, civil rights group says | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"A few bad apples on the metro force taint the hard work and dedication of their peers, all while under the blind eye of police commanders and a chief of police that enrich themselves with higher salaries and unprecedented promotions," Rich Rivera, co-chair of the alliance's Civil Rights Committee, said in the release.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

NYPD hearing begins for cop who killed Ramarley Graham in 2012

NYPD hearing begins for cop who killed Ramarley Graham in 2012 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The long-awaited departmental trial of Police Officer Richard Haste for the fatal 2012 shooting of Ramarley Graham begins Tuesday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The 3 Company Crises Boards Should Watch For

Here are some practices that facilitate problem-finding corporate governance:

Have an explicit negotiated agreement about the relationship between the board and management. The arrangement must allow the board and staff to do problem-finding work while not cutting across the turf of line management. For instance, at Infosys board work inside the organization and work by staff groups was governed by a rule: “noses in, fingers out.” While the board and staff may have found problems, line management was responsible for designing and implementing the solution.


Design the processes by which the board does its regular work — strategy development and approval, capital approvals, performance reviews, etc. — to embed problem-finding. This requires more than asking “tough” questions at the board meeting that managers can anticipate.


Adopt a problem-finding mindset. Think about parts of the organization that may be generating problems. Make explicit your theory about how that part of the organization works. Test the theory. Welcome news of risk; encourage early warning.


Understand that most problem-finding will happen outside the board room, and involve employees several levels below the executive team. Board members cannot expect to infer all the problems while sitting in the boardroom and cannot expect staff members to find them all. Problem-finding boards need some members (but not necessarily all) who spend time working closely with employees to find out how things really work.


Embed as much of the convergent problem-finding activity as possible into the performance measurement system for line managers and delegate the rest to staff groups. Problems will only be found reliably if the board mindfully ensures that these systems are designed to find problems and makes sure they are delivering.


Beware of biases and blind spots that result from becoming too steeped in the culture of the organization. Question the norms and assumptions that drive people’s behavior. Boards that enunciate the likely hidden assumptions underpinning the business’s culture are less likely to fall into a collusive blindness that inhibits their problem-finding.


Acknowledge the limitations in problem-finding and look for ways to mitigate them. Develop internal learning and reflection systems. These could be framed in terms of developing and enhancing capabilities in risk investigation, exploration, and analysis.


As strategic risk increases, so do the chances of failure because of ungoverned incompetence. Most of these failures are minor — generally, projects that are quietly written off. Occasionally a major disaster strikes, causing a corporate catastrophe. Corporate governance systems that assume failure is driven by malfeasance will often miss these failures, at least until they become unambiguous. To catch them early, boards need to put in place governance systems that are intrinsically problem-finding.

Rob Duke's insight:
HBR's organizational advice often applies to policing organizations with only slight "tweaking".  What part of this article is not good advice?

1. Noses in: Fingers out.  This is a shorthand way of describing the Politics-Administration Dichotomy.  The Board, or oversight authority, sets policy and we administer it.  We never get annoyed when they ask questions and decide to make changes and they never try to actually "do" the work.  They help identify the problems and we find the solution(s), but like James Madison's checks and balances, it works best when these powers are shared.

2. As Frank Boldt and I discovered (building on John Kingdon's work), not only do you need Problems, People, and Policy (solutions), but it's also important to examine the institutions (rules of the game) and also manage a co-alignment process where you not only reach up to invite input, but you also reach laterally and "down".  This insures balance with the entire network of interest holders and internalizes a problem-finding culture.

3. Also adopting something like the Balanced Scorecard budget and assessment system helps the organization maintain a problem-finding mindset.  When I know my evaluation depends on my place in the co-alignment system, then I'm working on it every day.  This creates a system that sustains nurturing and, more importantly, identifying when nurturing isn't happening.

4. We need to find an ethical system that demands that we examine how our actions impact the downstream customer...our grandchildren.  If we're not leaving it better for them, then we're probably doing something wrong.  A good start for this is to empower, embolden, and assign the devil's advocate role (both inside and outside the department).  We should celebrate the contrarians in our midst instead of delegating them to the dead end jobs.  These are the folks who will help us ensure that we are not captured by our times or by our culture.

5. Always know that what we're doing isn't good enough and that we need to be vigilant for ways to improve.  This means we need systems that encourage officers and staff to call down "airstrikes" on themselves when they realize that something isn't working; and they need to do this knowing that they won't be castigated, but will be celebrated for acknowledging an opportunity for internal learning and reflection.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Bernie Sanders Advocates That FBI Director Comey Step Down

Bernie Sanders Advocates That FBI Director Comey Step Down | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Bernie Sanders Advocates That FBI Director Comey Step Down
Rob Duke's insight:
They ignore that we have competing values at stake here, which left Comey with only one viable option:

1. We have the value of a separate and disinterested public bureaucracy.  Woodrow Wilson called this the Politics-Administration Dichotomy.  In exchange for a civil service system that put people into jobs based upon merit and then gave them a property right to keep the job based upon "good" performance, the public bureaucrat would stay out of "politics".  In other words, they wouldn't campaign and engage in all the dirty business of tit for tat revenge, extortion, and reciprocal back scratching of political cronies.
2. We also have the value of an independent police apparatus that will treat everyone equally and fairly.  This value grew out of the police professionalization movement that, in turn, came out of the same Progressive Movement that installed the Politics-Administration Dichotomy.  This movement has been informed further by the New Public Administration theory and practice that asserts that all public servants have an ethical obligation to trumpet the news whenever "the emperor has no clothes".  While the Politics-Administration Dichotomy camp suggests that the bureaucracy should focus on the areas of economy, effectiveness, and efficiency, the New Public Admin advocates argue that the idea of equity is above the simple management tasks (see Dwight Waldo, H. George Fredrickson, Chester Newland, for more on New Public Admin.)

Now, under this umbrella, FBI Director Comey was forced to endure the backlash from a political investigation that appeared to have been compromised when Attorney General Lynch met with former President Bill Clinton on a secluded tarmac in a private jet to discuss "grandchildren".  This was an explanation that few believed and placed the FBI in a position of seeming to be political lackeys.  

After this, the rank and file FBI agents were angry.  Many agents left successful and comfortable assignments with local and state police agencies.  I can only imagine their perception that the FBI had lost all credibility--they probably wished they had never transferred.  I also imagine that Comey knew this and knew that there was zero chance that a disgruntled agent would not leak the fact that they had discovered another server that had the potential to disclose emails that were deleted from the Clinton server.  Whether there were any additional emails or not is irrelevant because the scandal would be about cover up and not content--which is always an order of magnitude worse than the actual underlying scandal.

Thus, Comey was faced with competing values and a binary choice of action:

1. Follow a Politics-Administration Dichotomy path and say nothing; or
2. Follow a New Public Administration path and send a private letter to Congress alerting them to the likely source of new emails.

If you follow the first path and there's a leak, then Secretary Clinton's campaign would be damaged and you'd be accused of misfeasance; 

On the other hand, if you follow the second path, then you still risk a leak from Congress, but this type of leak should be less harmful than an accusation of further political skulduggery.  And, at least you won't be accused of participating in a cover up.  

While the second path might be used at the last minute to insinuate that there was still some criminal charge that might arise out of the FBI investigation, the FBI also acted quickly after that to review the emails and send the "all clear" signal.  This outcome would never have been so clean if it had also been accompanied by an accusation of cover up.

It seems clear to me that Comey really only had one choice given the new source for emails from the Clinton Server--he had to send the letter to Congressional leaders.  In my mind, this path wasn't inconsistent with the Politics-Administration Dichotomy path, it just also added an Equity element from the New Public Administration path that protected the public's perception of the FBI's ability to conduct fair, equal and unbiased investigations.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Johns Hopkins study suggests medical errors are third-leading cause of death in U.S.

Johns Hopkins study suggests medical errors are third-leading cause of death in U.S. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Diagnostic errors, medical mistakes led to more than 250,000 deaths in 2013, researchers estimate
Rob Duke's insight:
Backup for article above.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Samsung's Scion Had a Sleepless Night in 22 Straight Hours of Questioning

Samsung's Scion Had a Sleepless Night in 22 Straight Hours of Questioning | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Jay Y. Lee, who heads South Korea's massive Samsung Group, was given a $5 box meal for lunch and did not sleep in over 22 hours of questioning in a corruption scandal involving impeached President Park Geun-hye.
Rob Duke's insight:
We complain about the U.S. police, but look around the world and compare....22 hours of questioning...?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

President Donald Trump Calls Husband Of Murdered Orlando Police Officer

President Donald Trump Calls Husband Of Murdered Orlando Police Officer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Orlando, FL - The 45th President of the United States, Donald Trump, made a point during the busy inauguratio
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Police injured, more than 200 arrested at Trump inauguration protests

Police injured, more than 200 arrested at Trump inauguration protests | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Six police officers were injured and 217 protesters arrested Friday after a morning of peaceful protests and coordinated disruptions of Donald Trump's inauguration ceremony gave way to ugly street clashes in downtown Washington.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Fired Eaton Rapids police officer gets her job back

EATON RAPIDS - A police officer fired in May for reporting she was retaliated against for reporting sexual harassment by a male officer toward a fellow female officer has her job back.

An arbitrator issued a ruling in favor of reinstating officer Lisa Kirby last week, according to a staff member at Capital City Labor Program Inc.

The police union serves some 30 mid-Michigan law enforcement agencies and represented Kirby in arbitration after Eaton Rapids City Council unanimously rejected her request to be reinstated last June.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Smile, You're On Camera! DC Police Told To Keep Bodycams On During Inauguration Day Protests

Smile, You're On Camera! DC Police Told To Keep Bodycams On During Inauguration Day Protests | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Washington, DC - Despite the ACLU claiming that it's illegal, officers will be recording Inauguration Day protesters.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

EXCLUSIVE: Cop caught on camera trashing Mayor de Blasio punished

EXCLUSIVE: Cop caught on camera trashing Mayor de Blasio punished | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Bronx cop caught on video complaining about the Mayor has been docked eight vacation days, the Daily News has learned.

Officer Joseph Spina was penalized because he “expressed a personal opinion about public policy,” a police source said.

Cops do that all the time, a second source noted, but added that Spina complained while taking enforcement action — and a motorist was recording as Spina gave him a summons for driving without a license.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

DASHCAM: Deputy Under Fire During Wellness Check - Calibre Press

From the Ledger-Enquirer:  Matthew Edmondson is accused of shooting Deputy Michael Hockett, who was shot just before noon after he went to the residence to check on a person. He was transported to West Georgia Medical Center where he was treated for non-life threatening injuries. Edmondson was charged with one count each of criminal attempt …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Hero cops tackled armed man in 'suicide vest' near Arsenal's stadium

Hero cops tackled armed man in 'suicide vest' near Arsenal's stadium | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The officers challenged the man after witnesses described him as shouting aggressively and waving what appeared to be a machete in the street.

After he resisted they tackled him to the ground before spotting coloured electrical wires protruding from the suspect’s jacket - suggesting he was wearing a suicide vest.

Scotland Yard said that fearing for the public’s safety, Pcs Jason Hodgson and Alex Field “made the selfless decision to tightly hug the suspect to prevent his movement from triggering” what they feared to be a bomb.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Why Body Cameras Will Be Off as Officers Monitor Protesters

Why Body Cameras Will Be Off as Officers Monitor Protesters | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Civil rights groups are taking steps to ensure police respect the constitutional rights of demonstrators at the presidential inauguration. News 4's Mark Segraves reports on why D.C.
Rob Duke's insight:
Crazy policy.  There's no expectation of privacy in a public place nor in the presence of a police officer...seems like a non-issue to me.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Former No. 2 in L.A. Sheriff's office surrenders to prison to serve 5-year sentence

Former No. 2 in L.A. Sheriff's office surrenders to prison to serve 5-year sentence | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Former Los Angeles County Undersheriff Paul Tanaka surrendered Monday to federal authorities in Colorado to begin serving a five-year prison sentence for conspiracy and obstructing an FBI investigation into deputy jail abuses. Tanaka, who as the second-in-command ran day-to-day operations o
Rob Duke's insight:
You can't fight the Feds and you can never lie or dissemble to them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

NYPD K-9 Hunter, police dog who helped in Haiti, dead at 11

NYPD K-9 Hunter, police dog who helped in Haiti, dead at 11 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In his eight years with the NYPD, canine officer Hunter sniffed out illegal guns, while bringing joy to children of all ages.
Rob Duke's insight:
They, too, serve.....
more...
Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, January 16, 4:04 AM

God bless and keep those this K-9 has come in contact witb in its life as you Lord God love and provide for animals to.

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Video: Florida woman having ‘bad day' drives SUV into T-Mobile store

Video: Florida woman having ‘bad day' drives SUV into T-Mobile store | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Wellington, Florida, woman who told police she was having a “bad day” allegedly went on a rampage Thursday at a T-Mobile store in Palm Springs, according to an arrest report.
Rob Duke's insight:
One of the 99% calls we handle every day without using force--even though the person was batpoo cray cray at the time.

In another 10% (not very scientific methodology on my part), officer jack up the situation when they could do more to calm it down.

The other 89% are folks acting crazy or emotional that fly out of control so quickly and erratically that officer respond as trained to keep themselves and others safe...with often tragic results.  This results in a fatality about 900 times a year across the U.S.  These are all tragic--even those with felonious intent.

But lets keep this in perspective.  Gun deaths are 30 times greater and automobile deaths are also 30 times greater, but the real shocking number is the number of medical malpractice deaths in the U.S. every year.  Take a guess: ____________

How many did you say?

It was 120,000 medical practice deaths in 2016 as reported by the doctors themselves (John Hopkins said the number in 2013 was 250,000 deaths if you include pharmacist malpractice).

There are 70,000 licensed doctors in the U.S.

765,000 sworn officers in the U.S. who kill about 1000 each year.

So, you're 120 times more likely to be killed by your doctor (or 250 times if you include pharmacists).

Your 30 times more likely to be killed by someone with a gun or car.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

BREAKING: Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Officer Attacked, Struck, Dragged, In Hit And Run

BREAKING: Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Officer Attacked, Struck, Dragged, In Hit And Run | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Las Vegas, NV - A Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Officer was struck and dragged for several feet by a suspect drive
more...
No comment yet.