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Man shot by DC police officer pointed gun at him, authorities say - Washington Post (blog)

W*USA 9Man shot by DC police officer pointed gun at him, authorities sayWashington Post (blog)A man whom a D.C.
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Gregory's comment, December 1, 2012 3:42 PM
Most people would jump the gun and completely side with the officer but I did see a few flaws with this whole mess. Let me just state that the officer was in the right when he fired his gun. The man did point a gun at him and that gives an officer the right to defend himself. But how did this whole thing start? Well remember that the article said the officer made eye contact with the guy from his car, and then decided to try to do a search on the guy with no probable cause. It did say that he had he hand on his waist so yeah the guy was most likely holding on to his gun but think about why he would do that. The officer was not in a police car, and this was a poor part of the city. The man most likely carries an unloaded gun to scare people off who try to attack him but because it was unloaded you know he does not have any intention to kill. When the officer was chasing him without a uniform on, or a police car the guy thought he was being attack. Maybe this guy is wanted by some gang, maybe he owes money, or maybe hes been shot at before making him really paranoid. Also could be the departments fault for not making that neighbor hood safe in the first place so this man wouldn't be fearing for his life. This is what I believe what should happen. The man needs to be questioned for why he ran and pointed a gun at the other guy, so that the officers can try to fix whats going on in that poorer part of town. With the mans support I believe that he should go free, because the officer is half at fault and the fact he did not carrier a loaded gun.
Benjamin Russell's comment, December 8, 2012 6:19 PM
I do not see anything wrong with any part of the officers actions at any stage in this incident. The officer saw signs of suspicious behavior by the man during the late night in a bad part of town and , because of his suspicious the officer, who was wearing a police vest and a badge around his neck, approached the man and ASK if he could search him. Then the man began running and flashing his gun. At this point, the officer had full obligation to pursue the man. I believe that the officer was just in everything he did from this point on as well, and as the fleeing individual aimed a gun at the officer, loaded or not, the officer was in fear of his life and had every right to shoot at the man.
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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The Ferguson Riots Show Why Good Cops Will Quit

The Ferguson Riots Show Why Good Cops Will Quit | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
For masculine men
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Please shoot me

Please shoot me | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
IN THE first part of VICE News's extraordinary five-part documentary on ISIS, released earlier this month, a bearded and strangely innocent-looking young press...
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Video released of man shooting Alpharetta police officer

Video released of man shooting Alpharetta police officer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Newly released video shows the moment when Alpharetta police officer David Freeman barely escaped death.
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A big payout, but justice still denied 

A big payout, but justice still denied  | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Sexton: The dollar figure was so large and the public statements of vindication and concession so harmonious, one might have been tempted to think the system had actually worked.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Op-Ed by Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr.

Op-Ed by Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
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A pretty balanced statement....

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Veteran Cop: 'If You Don't Want To Get Shot,' Shut Up -- Even If We're Violating Your Rights

Veteran Cop: 'If You Don't Want To Get Shot,' Shut Up -- Even If We're Violating Your Rights | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Sunil Dutta, a 17-year veteran of the Los Angeles Police Department and adjunct instructor of homeland security at Colorado Technical University, has a suggestion for victims of police violence searching for someone to blame: Look in the mirror.

I...
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A misleading headline.  Dutta might want to rethink the way he explains this concept.  While I agree, it's a simple request to comply on the scene and then go to the station and complain; the other side also has a legitimate complaint that nothing changes with that approach (as we saw under Jim Crow through the civil rights era and even until today); and, furthermore, it's a slippery slope to merely comply because the government tells you to do so.  Is there a solution?  Officers have some reasonable expectation to safety and citizens have a reasonable expectation to have an authentic way to challenge police actions.  Without proof of the circumstances, it becomes a case of dueling perceptions.  Did the officer have the requisite alchemy of sometimes nebulous ingredients sufficient to satisfy the demands of reasonable suspicion and/or probable cause?  It depends on the circumstances, time, place, manner of the activity, even the training and experience of the officer factors in.  Frankly, no citizen is ever going to have all this info (or be qualified to evaluate), nor is it reasonable for us to ask officers to delay officer safety concerns (e.g. pat down searches for weapons, warrant checks, etc.) long enough to satisfy a citizen that a stop is based upon legitimate probable cause and not racial profiling--nor could we expect there to be agreement under the stress and emotion of the real-time detention.  Given these circumstances, I propose one not-so-novel solution; and one solution not generally under discussion.  First the not-so-novel solution: 1. Improve evidence gathering and storage through the use of recording devices: belt recorders, livescribe pens, body cameras (where available), vehicle cameras.  Furthermore, a system to routinize the collection and preservation of this evidence needs to be designed, built and funded, so that all agencies/communities, regardless of fiscal resources, can be protected equally. Now, for the novel solution: 2. Engage in a three-part approach to dispute resolution and restoration: Part I: enlist experts (each community has candidates possessing skills or who can be trained) familiar with community visioning and team building to create dialogue and design systems to begin removing saddle burrs, extracting thorns, dislodging the wedges of discontent in communities.  These issues include not just problems associated with what Muir calls the "Power of the Sword"--though coercive power is certainly the most visible police problem--but we must also pay particular attention to the "Power of the Purse", the under-investment in communities that sustains the need and existence of underground economies based upon contraband and vice, and, the "Power of the Word", that enables all sorts of verbal and political dirty dealings (rent-seeking behaviors) to mask inequities and impotent attempts to remedy the myriad of problems that lie at the root of any major community disgruntlement.  We're foolish to think that, Ferguson, Los Angeles, Chicago, etc. are experiencing unrest only because the cops are engaging in racial profiling.  Dispute Resolution only works if we blast the problem with sunshine so that all problems are addressed on something resembling equal footing, whether these be problems of the sword, the word, or the purse.  Part II: capacity must be built so that everyone has access to Dispute Resolution systems.  This means that we need to find funding for system design and mediation centers that can resolve problems in real time--not the years civil and criminal courts often need to process cases (though courts are, of course, still needed for serious cases and as the appellate process for more informal programs of dispute resolution).  We can't expect ADR to work if we don't design, implement, fund, evaluate, tweek, and perform expert analysis to improve theoretical understandings of what works and what doesn't.  Part III: community leaders, including the cops, must be trained in Dispute System Design and Alternative Dispute Resolution techniques.  It's not enough to find a vision and restore goodwill (Part I), nor develop a plan to capture the promise of good intentions as concrete goods to be shared by all (Part II), we must also teach people, encourage them, and provide time, public spaces, private meeting spaces, and other resources to actually embrace the concept of restoring their communities through dispute resolution.

As always, please share your comments and ideas.

 

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Rob Duke's curator insight, August 21, 8:23 AM

A misleading headline.  Dutta might want to rethink the way he explains this concept.  While I agree, it's a simple request to comply on the scene and then go to the station and complain; the other side also has a legitimate complaint that nothing changes with that approach (as we saw under Jim Crow through the civil rights era and even until today); and, furthermore, it's a slippery slope to merely comply because the government tells you to do so.  Is there a solution?  Officers have some reasonable expectation to safety and citizens have a reasonable expectation to have an authentic way to challenge police actions.  Without proof of the circumstances, it becomes a case of dueling perceptions.  Did the officer have the requisite alchemy of sometimes nebulous ingredients sufficient to satisfy the demands of reasonable suspicion and/or probable cause?  It depends on the circumstances, time, place, manner of the activity, even the training and experience of the officer factors in.  Frankly, no citizen is ever going to have all this info (or be qualified to evaluate), nor is it reasonable for us to ask officers to delay officer safety concerns (e.g. pat down searches for weapons, warrant checks, etc.) long enough to satisfy a citizen that a stop is based upon legitimate probable cause and not racial profiling--nor could we expect there to be agreement under the stress and emotion of the real-time detention.  Given these circumstances, I propose one not-so-novel solution; and one solution not generally under discussion.  First the not-so-novel solution: 1. Improve evidence gathering and storage through the use of recording devices: belt recorders, livescribe pens, body cameras (where available), vehicle cameras.  Furthermore, a system to routinize the collection and preservation of this evidence needs to be designed, built and funded, so that all agencies/communities, regardless of fiscal resources, can be protected equally. Now, for the novel solution: 2. Engage in a three-part approach to dispute resolution and restoration: Part I: enlist experts (each community has candidates possessing skills or who can be trained) familiar with community visioning and team building to create dialogue and design systems to begin removing saddle burrs, extracting thorns, dislodging the wedges of discontent in communities.  These issues include not just problems associated with what Muir calls the "Power of the Sword"--though coercive power is certainly the most visible police problem--but we must also pay particular attention to the "Power of the Purse", the under-investment in communities that sustains the need and existence of underground economies based upon contraband and vice, and, the "Power of the Word", that enables all sorts of verbal and political dirty dealings (rent-seeking behaviors) to mask inequities and impotent attempts to remedy the myriad of problems that lie at the root of any major community disgruntlement.  We're foolish to think that, Ferguson, Los Angeles, Chicago, etc. are experiencing unrest only because the cops are engaging in racial profiling.  Dispute Resolution only works if we blast the problem with sunshine so that all problems are addressed on something resembling equal footing, whether these be problems of the sword, the word, or the purse.  Part II: capacity must be built so that everyone has access to Dispute Resolution systems.  This means that we need to find funding for system design and mediation centers that can resolve problems in real time--not the years civil and criminal courts often need to process cases (though courts are, of course, still needed for serious cases and as the appellate process for more informal programs of dispute resolution).  We can't expect ADR to work if we don't design, implement, fund, evaluate, tweek, and perform expert analysis to improve theoretical understandings of what works and what doesn't.  Part III: community leaders, including the cops, must be trained in Dispute System Design and Alternative Dispute Resolution techniques.  It's not enough to find a vision and restore goodwill (Part I), nor develop a plan to capture the promise of good intentions as concrete goods to be shared by all (Part II), we must also teach people, encourage them, and provide time, public spaces, private meeting spaces, and other resources to actually embrace the concept of restoring their communities through dispute resolution.

As always, please share your comments and ideas.

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Officer involved in Walmart shooting back on the job

Officer involved in Walmart shooting back on the job | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Beavercreek City Attorney Stephen McHugh says Sergeant David Darkow returned earlier this month.
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'No' Sheriff in Town: Some Lawmen Refuse to Enforce Federal Gun Laws - NBC News

'No' Sheriff in Town: Some Lawmen Refuse to Enforce Federal Gun Laws - NBC News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
With more states passing stronger gun control laws, rural sheriffs across the country are taking their role as defenders of the Constitution to a new level b...
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Study: Skipping sleep may increase risk of false memories, compromise criminal investigations - Newsday

Study: Skipping sleep may increase risk of false memories, compromise criminal investigations - Newsday | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Skipping a few hours of sleep here and there, or even on a regular basis,
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Video of Bethel police shooting comes amid two investigations

Video of Bethel police shooting comes amid two investigations | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The three-minute video posted Monday on radio station KYUK’s web site and Facebook page shows an altercation Friday between a man and two officers in which he rushes them with a baseball bat, swings at an officer who had fallen, and ends up on the ground himself. Alaska State Troopers, who are investigating the incident, say the man was shot.
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see video below.

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LAPD officer wounded, suspect killed in 110 Freeway shootout

LAPD officer wounded, suspect killed in 110 Freeway shootout | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A section of the northbound 110 Freeway heading into downtown was closed early Monday as Los Angeles police investigated a shooting that they said left one of two gunmen dead and an officer wounded.
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We don't need to be militarized, except when we do...

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What happens when police wear cameras

What happens when police wear cameras | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
One problem with police departments' body-mounted cameras has been the cost—expenses can mount in the storage and management of the data they generate.
Rob Duke's insight:

Problems: 1. Storage cost; 2. reliability (technology is new and fragile); 3. reliability (software/hardware, but assumption when data lost may be that cops are covering up; 4. cameras only capture one angle and the human eye and head can capture nearly 360 degrees, thus a perceived threat may not be captured on camera; 5. rules on discoverability (criminal and civil cases) and Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests--what do we release and when?  How does that impact victim confidentiality and/or informants?

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The Coming Race War Won’t Be About Race

The Coming Race War Won’t Be About Race | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Ferguson is not just about systemic racism—it's about class warfare, and how America's poor are held back
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Ferguson and Future Generations of Law Enforcement

A status popped up on my personal feed today. It was posted by a good family friend, an Oklahoma deputy who is an amazing  husband and daddy to three little ones. Like many little boys who have a...
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Sad, but true, most cops I know try to discourage our children from following in our footsteps.  Most of us would do it over again and would do it for free if we had a major depression and we collectively couldn't pay our cops a full wage, yet we wouldn't wish the heartaches and headaches on our worst enemies.  Isn't that a paradox?

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Nine Time-Tested Rules of Good Policing

Nine Time-Tested Rules of Good Policing | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The consent and collaboration of residents is key: 'The police are the public and the public are the police'
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We're Compiling Every Police-Involved Shooting In America. Help Us.

We're Compiling Every Police-Involved Shooting In America. Help Us. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

The United States has no database of police shootings. There is no standardized process by which officers log when they've discharged their weapons and why. There is no central infrastructure for handling that information and making it public.


Via dMaculate
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The FBI needs to modify the Uniform Crime Report (UCR) asap and start collecting these statistics:

Officer involved shootings;

All weapon discharges including accidental discharges;

Use of force incidents resulting in medical care for officers or civilians;

Any injuries to officers, suspects, others in any of these incidents.

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Police Department Says Cop Camera Footage Not Public Record - Hit & Run : Reason.com

Police Department Says Cop Camera Footage Not Public Record - Hit & Run : Reason.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
After resisting for decades, Major League Baseball has adopted instant replay on nearly all disputed calls, providing a transparent and public view of
Rob Duke's insight:

There should be some authority outside departments to audit these recordings, but I'm not sure our media is the right entity.  When the press was free and not dominated by two or three big corporations, it might have made sense, but today sensationalism seems to be more important than truth and justice.  On the other hand, we may never hear the end of this until we do just open up the files.  If that's what we collectively decide, then Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests are just another cost center that must be accounted for when we figure out how to finance video, maintenance/repairs, storage, and dissemination for court, discovery, and FOIA requests.  Few departments are currently prepared for this and most small departments couldn't begin to afford the costs associated with this mostly new function.

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Take It From a Cop: The Drug War Poisons Community Policing - Substance.com

Take It From a Cop: The Drug War Poisons Community Policing - Substance.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Events in Ferguson expose US law enforcement's longstanding abandonment of its founding ethical principles. Rebuilding relationships with the people we've harmed won't come easily.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is too simplistic an argument for a complex problem.  As William Ker Muir pointed out in his 1979 "Police: Street-Corner Politicians", the Power of the Sword is only one part of the problem facing communities and the officer charged with maintaining public safety and keeping the peace.  Equally powerful and also subject to abuse are the Power of the Word; and the Power of the Purse.  Until we give equal time to media scrutiny, peace marches, and riots to these power abuses, we'll never solve this problem.  Communities need economic investment and jobs, they need to build capacity to reclaim the social organization that can tame the deviant subculture that tolerates the underground economy and the resultant selfish behaviors that undermine civil society and the rule of law.  However, as long as political rhetoric justifies when economic investment are withheld from these communities, nothing significant will change.  So, whenever we attack the Power of the Sword (and we should remain vigilant to this type of abuse), we should give equal examination and critique to the abuses of the Power of the Word and those of the Power of the Purse.

Muir, William Ker, Police: Street-Corner Politicians, Univ. of Chicago Press, 1979.

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St. Louis Police Release Video Of Kajieme Powell Killing That Appears At Odds With Their Story

St. Louis Police Release Video Of Kajieme Powell Killing That Appears At Odds With Their Story | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department released cell phone footage Wednesday of the police shooting of Kajieme Powell, a 25-year-old black man killed on Tuesday in St. Louis, according to St. Louis Public Radio.

A convenience store owner cal...
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Rob Duke's comment, August 21, 8:29 AM
Too much said at the news conference. The details become fuel for contention, instead of the totality of the circumstances. We should be debating whether it's reasonable for officers to let a knife wielding man threaten a neighborhood; whether it's reasonable to let him get so close as to be a threat to them; and, whether they have a duty to retreat when he encroaches into their safety zones. These are fundamental issues, which the video provides some basis for debate. Instead we're arguing about whether the Chief correctly described the way the knife was held or whether the man was 3-4 feet or 6-10 feet away from officers when they fired on him.
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Michael Brown's Autopsy: What It Can (and Can't) Tell Us

Michael Brown's Autopsy: What It Can (and Can't) Tell Us | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The results of two autopsies of Michael Brown, the unarmed teenager shot by a St. Louis police officer on Aug. 9, can't provide crucial information about the circumstances surrounding the shooting.
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Nelly Tells Eric Holder: Community Trust Is Broken in Ferguson - NBC News

Nelly Tells Eric Holder: Community Trust Is Broken in Ferguson - NBC News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Grammy-winning rapper Nelly told Attorney General Eric Holder on Wednesday that law enforcement in Ferguson, Missouri, had lost the trust of the community an...
Rob Duke's insight:

Brown is a symbol...symbols are often chosen like similes for similarities, but not for a perfect fit.  Brown symbolizes broken trust, though now it begins to look as if the evidence may show that the officer reasonably feared for his safety.

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Police Wives Association request help

Police Wives Association request help | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
If you talk to any of the 200 or 300 men and women in blue who have been serving in Ferguson this past week, they'll tell you about bricks and bottles and bullets lobbed at them nightly.
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Amid protests, LAPD explains fatal shooting of South L.A. man

Amid protests, LAPD explains fatal shooting of South L.A. man | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Los Angeles police on Wednesday defended an officer-involved shooting that left a 25-year-old man dead, saying he tackled one of two officers, forcing him to use a backup gun.
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An Open Letter to Captain Ronald S. Johnson -

To the head of the Missouri State Highway Patrol: you blew it
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Watch John Oliver’s Take on Ferguson and the Police

Watch John Oliver’s Take on Ferguson and the Police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
There was really only one story that John Oliver could devote his main story to on Sunday night’s episode of Last Week Tonight. And while he got in quite a few jokes in his long segment about Ferguson, Missouri, and the militarization of American police departments, he began solemnly and ended in anger.
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Last one.

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