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Staffing declines stall city's community policing plans - Anchorage Daily News

Staffing declines stall city's community policing plans - Anchorage Daily News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The NYPD model is to track the crime hotspots (using CompStat software) and then saturate the areas with officers conducting "stop and frisk" in heavy pedestrian areas and traffic stops in areas where people travel mostly by car (sprawled cities like Anchorage). While it's an effective policy to reduce crime; over time it can result in an increased tension between minority citizens and the police.
The West Coast model has been to adopt a more community policing model wherein officers come to know the community and instead of saturating for enforcement as the primary tool, officers learn to address the root problems. They do this by having an analyst team (sometimes using a rival software ESRI) discuss the top 10 addresses for service calls in each beat and then ask officers to find out why these problems occur. Some officers are also embedded in the community as school officers and as community policing officers. Officers attend truancy hearings, community meetings and hang out at the local boys and girls clubs. Officers coach sports teams and lead after school homework centers. The NYPD model is leaner, but we're seeing unrest after a sustained effort in policing in this manner. On the other hand, west coast departments have enjoyed increasingly civil relationships from their communities (though that's hard pressed right now with lean municipal budgets). [This has been a simplified discussion of the actual techniques].
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Police 'lethal force' simulator makes a Baltimore grand jury more sympathetic to cops

Police 'lethal force' simulator makes a Baltimore grand jury more sympathetic to cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
When a recent slate of jurors met with Baltimore police officers and put themselves in their shoes, they came away with a distinct impression: that the city's cops deserve sympathy — and better pay.
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California Governor Brown Signs Bill Protecting Californians from Civil Asset Forfeiture Abuse | Drug Policy Alliance

California Governor Brown Signs Bill Protecting Californians from Civil Asset Forfeiture Abuse | Drug Policy Alliance | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Senate Bill 443, authored by Senator Holly Mitchell (D-Los Angeles) and Assemblymember David Hadley (R-Torrance), establishes some of the nation’s strictest standards to protect due process and property rights by requiring a conviction in most cases prior to the permanent loss of property through civil asset forfeiture.  Starting on January 1, 2017, California law will require a conviction prior to forfeiture in any state case where the items seized are cash under $40,000 or other property such as homes and vehicles regardless of value. This updates current law, which has a conviction threshold for cash up to $25,000.

For all future cases handled through federal courts, the new law prevents California law enforcement agencies from receiving a share of federally forfeited property unless there is a conviction in an underlying case involving seized property that is up to $40,000 in cash or for cars and homes.  Previously there was no threshold whatsoever for law enforcement accepting cash or proceeds from federal forfeitures, even when there was no conviction.
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Chris Campbell's comment, Today, 1:45 AM
This is interesting because not only does it keep law enforcement in check it also allows for citizens to have more rights that protect them from the abuse of power by the police. I can see that there would be both bad and good sides to this depending upon if you where viewing it from an officer stand point or if you where viewing it from a citizen standpoint. I do not believe this is a bad law to enact but it does mean that convictions need to be more scrutinized.
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Undocumented Immigrants Get First Due Process Law In The US

Undocumented Immigrants Get First Due Process Law In The US | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
California on Wednesday became the first state to require that undocumented immigrants be told of their right to an attorney before being interviewed by federal immigration authorities while in custody.
The Transparent Review of Unjust Transfers and Holds Act, parts of which goes into effect in 2017, was sign by Gov. Jerry Brown, who called it a “measured approach to due process and transparency principles.”
The law, commonly referred to as the Truth Act, also requires that police departments give an immigrants’ attorney or advocate the same information they shared with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). A public forum must also be held every year to disclose local law enforcement’s role in federal immigration policy. Immigrants will also be advised that they don’t have to speak with ICE agents.
“Behind closed doors, ICE has inserted itself into the fragile relationship between local police and immigrant communities by requesting local police take on the role of federal immigration agents,” said California Assemblyman Rob Bonta, who authored the Truth Act. “With today’s action, California leads the nation with sensible immigration policies that protect the rights of immigrants and shine a light on flawed federal priorities.”
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Chadbourn town manager confirms officer was fired after Facebook post

Chadbourn town manager confirms officer was fired after Facebook post | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
CHADBOURN, NC (WECT) -
Chadbourn Interim Town Manager Pat Garrell has confirmed Ricky Soles, a police officer with the Chadbourn Police Department, was fired Tuesday  following backlash over a post he made on Facebook.

Soles said he was given the opportunity to resign, and refused. Soles added he was then terminated on the grounds that his actions were unbecoming of a police officer and violated the law enforcement code of ethics.

Garrell said Wednesday another officer with the police department has since resigned, and a recently hired officer, who was supposed to begin working Monday, pulled their employment. Garrell said numerous people in the department are working overtime as a result, and that the Columbus County Sheriff's Office has offered their assistance. 

Soles deleted his Facebook account Monday after many community members called his post racist and offensive. 
Rob Duke's insight:
Poor judgement.  As an officer, there's never a time when you get to say "oh, I was off-duty, that doesn't count..."
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Boyd Thomas Branch's comment, Today, 7:08 PM
Yes certainly poor judgement. At some point you have to think to yourself is this a good idea and will it pass the red face test. Can I talk openly about this without getting embarrassed then you probably should not post it on social media. This is a particularly bad choice given the recent events in NC.
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Cop Dies After Suspect Spat On Her Face (Photos)

Cop Dies After Suspect Spat On Her Face (Photos) | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
She late
Rob Duke's insight:
TB is nasty and easy to transmit...
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David's comment, September 28, 8:00 PM
Those things you don't even want to wish for your enemies... Whenever those nasty things were happining, people have to go and check with the doctor right away. If she would checked herself right away maybe there were a chance to heal up.
Chris Campbell's comment, Today, 2:04 AM
This is one of the issue's cops face everyday they are on the job. It is part of being a police officer that you are exposed to these levels of harm. I would say though that in this situation the offender should be prosecuted for assault and manslaughter. Treatment of police in this fashion can not be tolerated.
Boyd Thomas Branch's comment, Today, 7:16 PM
This person should absolutely be charged. His actions led to her death which is what murder is all about. I have been spit on by people who I am arrested and it really is a horrible feeling. I have been spit on by a person with aids and that was a horrible feeling. The months of testing was horrible for me and my family.
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How Open-Carry Laws Played Into Charlotte Shooting

How Open-Carry Laws Played Into Charlotte Shooting
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Boyd Thomas Branch's comment, Today, 7:22 PM
Whether the presence of a gun is enough to stop the man there is a simple solution. Listen to what the police are telling you to do. Especially listen to the police when they have guns pointed at you. I do not have issues with open carry and people having guns but I do have issues with people holding guns and not listening to police when they tell you to drop a gun. A person can lift a gun and fire before an officer can even perceive the threat and movement. These events unfold quickly and many can be solved by listening to what the police tell you to do.
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Redlands police officer says he wasn’t the only hero in San Bernardino terrorist attack

Redlands police officer says he wasn’t the only hero in San Bernardino terrorist attack | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
REDLANDS >> Officer Joseph Aguilar transferred from San Bernardino to the Redlands Police Department just a few months before the Dec. 2 terrorist attack.

So, when he heard over the radio that Redlands police were pursuing Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik’s black sport utility vehicle toward San Bernardino, a town he knew very well, he immediately jumped in to assist.

“Seeing how they were going to San Bernardino and me coming fresh from there, I figured I would be a benefit and I could help out any way I can,” Aguilar recalled.

He joined the pursuit, which ended in a shootout on San Bernardino Avenue.

“That’s when everything gets real,” Aguilar said. “You kind of buckle down and let your training kick in.”

The shootout ended in the deaths of Farook and Malik — the couple who hours earlier had opened fire on a gathering of county workers at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, killing 14 people and wounding 22 others.

Earlier this month, Aguilar and officers from San Bernardino and the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department were honored for their efforts on Dec. 2 with the Medal of Valor, awarded by Gov. Jerry Brown and Attorney General Kamala Harris.
Rob Duke's insight:
Redlands is my "home" department where I got my start many years ago.
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Tulsa DA files manslaughter charges before TPD detective files report

Tulsa DA files manslaughter charges before TPD detective files report | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
TULSA - The lead detective on the Terence Crutcher officer-involved shooting death says he's still working on his investigation, hours after the Tulsa County district attorney filed
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Boyd Thomas Branch's comment, September 26, 12:29 AM
I concur there that police officers should be charged if it can be proven that they were not righteous to shoot the person or use force on a person. BUT when an officer uses force it is important that the officer be able to articulate that they used the for they thought reasonable to them. There are lot factors that go into a use of force decision and they must be made in a split second. I am certainly not condoning the shooting of un armed people but if the officer acted in a reason manner then and applied the type of force THEY determined to be necessary then that is a big factor that needs to be considered.
Leah Haskell's comment, September 26, 12:59 AM
For my research paper I've learned that there is not a general rule about officers and use of deadly force. I think it's right that officers are being held accountable for fatal shootings but I think it's unfair for some officers to get away with it and some face punishment. When some officers get away with crime it sets a message to others police officers that is okay and they can get away with it as well. I also feel with the fight for justice, some are charging officers when they don't deserve it.
justin's comment, September 27, 7:09 PM
The problem with this story is that there is conflicting results from the media which fuels the fire of the American people. I am all for the officer being charged if she was in fact the individual who shot first. but now the media is also saying another officer was the first to shoot.
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Charlotte shooting: Police release video and photo evidence

Charlotte shooting: Police release video and photo evidence | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Charlotte officials say they are discussing whether to release authorities' videos of the Keith Lamont Scott's fatal shooting by police as soon as Saturday.
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Boyd Thomas Branch's comment, September 26, 12:35 AM
This certainly a sad deal that could have been avoided by someone making a better choice and listening to commands being given to him. At some point in the last few years society has stopped listening or observing the facts and has started forming an opinion based on emotions. I do not see a race issue when one black person shoot another person. I think is a media issue and they are playing on the heart strings of Americans.
Leah Haskell's comment, September 26, 1:32 AM
This article is really confusing, the wife is shouting he doesn't have an gun he has a brain issue, the officers are shouting drop the gun. So did this man have a gun. Also when dealing with people who suffering with brain issues how do officers tell. If cops don't see a gun do they have a right to shoot? Also if people stop reaching for their pockets then officers don't have a reason to suspect a weapon. I also love how it was mention that officer was black, so does that mean is no longer about white cops killing black men? It's just officers in general.
David's comment, September 28, 8:09 PM
With those accidents that are happining lately, Police is losing their power and authority in the communities and States...
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The rise and fall of community policing in Chicago

The rise and fall of community policing in Chicago | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Community policing has long been a matter of life and death in Chicago. When it's worked, researchers have found that communities of color report less fear of crime and better relations with the police, which can translate into improved crime prevention and fewer shootings. And in a year when shootings have skyrocketed and community trust of the police has been severely damaged by the release of a series of videos capturing police shootings, it's been touted by politicians as a powerful crime-fighting strategy.

"Chicago is where the whole idea of community policing began," Mayor Rahm Emanuel said in a speech on police accountability on December 9, 2015, just two weeks after the release of the Laquan McDonald video rocked the city and sparked a crisis in police-community relations. "It remains the best and most comprehensive approach we have in changing the everyday conditions that breed crime and violence and then breed mistrust."

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David's comment, September 23, 4:00 PM
Statistics say that there is bigger chance to die from police if you're African-American rather than white....
Clarence Kalistook's comment, September 24, 2:44 AM
Community policing is a great way to deal with crime and even help lower it. Chicago has the right idea to make such an effort to lower crime rates and by doing this, the community is helping the police and making it easier for them. There are consequences to community policing though, the fact that unarmed citizens are roaming around is still dangerous as the criminals most likely may have a weapon. With an opposing force, there is always a different force that equals the positions of each side.
Linda Darnell's comment, September 24, 2:00 PM
I agree that Chicago has the right idea in aiming for improving community-police relations. These efforts can help not only regain trust from the community but also improve the perception the police officer has on the community and encourage them to use interpersonal communication first before resorting to physical solutions.
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Los Angeles Police Protective League: Police Commission tells officers to run away, or else

Los Angeles Police Protective League: Police Commission tells officers to run away, or else | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Run away. If a police officer is confronted by a suspect with a weapon, those entrusted to set policies for the Police Department believe officers should run away.
Rob Duke's insight:
Not EVER going to happen.  As Aristotle advised: "never pass a law that violates natural law".  This is a rule that will not be obeyed.  It's impossible to ask people not to protect themselves....

This also highlights the problem of putting "others" in charge of evaluating whether the police acted appropriately.  I think it should be retired judges...that's a fair compromise....
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Chris Campbell's comment, September 22, 6:33 PM
This is unbelievable that the commission would or even could say such a thing. What would the public think if they say a officer running away? If the officer did run away and the suspect decided to run into a nearby store and kill shoppers would the officer by at fault then for running too far away. This is complete opposite of what the police are meant to stand for. The commission has its own political agenda and only cares to satisfy the people that put money in their wallets.
David's comment, September 23, 4:18 PM
Run away? Is this a joke? I think it's sarcasm due to the recent events that happened with police and African Americans.
Tyler Hytry's comment, September 23, 8:35 PM
Just think about why officers are paid. They don't get paid for what they do, but for what they might have to do. Running away would completely nullify that statement.
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‘The whole thing smells’: Some city officials want outside investigation of Police Chief Aragon

‘The whole thing smells’: Some city officials want outside investigation of Police Chief Aragon | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — A majority of Fairbanks City Council members want to launch an independent investigation into police Chief Randall Aragon’s alleged business impropriety. A city official said the administration is
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Chris Campbell's comment, September 22, 6:23 PM
This is very interesting to read and does make quite a few questions arise when considering the fact that the previous police chief was directly involved in submitting evidence to the court to be reviewed upon. It sounds like there are a lot of personal strings attached and this will go beyond just the simple legal matter and will filter in quite a few personal matters from both sides.
Linda Darnell's comment, September 24, 2:06 PM
It seems like somebody somewhere is abusing the power that the community has given them instead of respecting the power, their position, and the community. Sometimes it seems people in positions of power forget they are often given the power to serve the community.
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Who is the Tulsa cop under review in the Terrence Crutcher shooting?

Who is the Tulsa cop under review in the Terrence Crutcher shooting? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Shelby's work history and past conduct are under scrutiny as authorities probe whether she acted within reason or used excessive force.
Rob Duke's insight:
A Drug Recognition Expert (DRE), but didn't recognize the symptoms of PCP?  Ug...this one keeps getting worse....
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Are 911 calls affected by police violence?

Are 911 calls affected by police violence? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A trio of sociologists, Matthew Desmond, Andrew V. Papachristos and David S. Kirk, investigated 911 calls made in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, before and after a high-profile case of police violence against a black man. They found that, especially in black areas of the city, 911 calls declined after the fact -- and crime went up.
Though some of the findings, published in the American Sociological Review on Thursday, are more than 10 years old, the researchers say they are still relevant today. The deaths of Michael Brown, Freddie Gray, and more recently, Keith Scott and Terence Crutcher -- all at the hands of police -- have sparked conversations that are analogous to the study's findings.
It's something that, culturally, we can sense every time a new episode comes to light: Police violence against black citizens erodes trust in law enforcement, especially in black communities.
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Former LASD Deputy Acquitted in Jail Beating Cover Up Case

Former LASD Deputy Acquitted in Jail Beating Cover Up Case | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A jury on Wednesday acquitted a former Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputy of federal charges that he helped cover up the beating of a visitor to a county jail, but the panel deadlocked over whether the lawman lied to investigators about the incident.


Deputies walk past cells on the 3000 floor of the L.A. County Men’s Central Jail. (Credit: Los Angeles Times)
The verdict marks a rare loss for the U.S. attorney’s office in Los Angeles, which has won a string of abuse and obstruction cases against deputies and higher-ranking sheriff’s officials following an FBI investigation into county jails.

Byron Dredd, 33, faced two counts of wrongdoing that arose from allegations he had conspired with the deputies involved in the beating to fabricate reports that placed the blame on the victim. A third charge indicated he lied about the incident to FBI agents during an interview. Dredd himself was not accused of taking part in the beating.
Rob Duke's insight:
This was always going to be a tough case.  Here's the scenario: the FBI thinks there's abuse going on in L.A. County Jail, so they send in an informant who sneaks in cell phones, etc. so he can document anything he sees that might be abusive and can call the FBI.  The problem is that there are laws and policies about bringing contraband into jails.  Cel Phones create a security risk and are just as dangerous as sneaking a gun into a prison.  LASD finds the phone and the offender may or may not have told them that he was an informant for the  FBI.  Everything that stems from this is a bit of a "pissing contest" between then LA Sheriff, Lee Baca and the FBI.  Everybody knows you can't fight the feds, and maybe LASD just played some games with them (hiding the informant by releasing the wrong guy under the informant's name, moving the informant into obscure locations in the jail, etc.).  The FBI's case doesn't rest on alleged abuse, but on the obstruction charges and "lying".
Should the FBI have contacted Baca's office and asked for cooperation in the investigation before all this got started?  It depends if they thought Baca had knowledge and condoned the behavior.  Though I doubt that was the case: Anyone who knows how big organizations work would likely know that Baca had no idea what was happening with employee x way down in his 18000 employees.  If you don't think the top is involved, then yes the best way to have done this type of investigation that: 1. jeopardizes the safety of the jail; and 2. breaks the law by smuggling in contraband would have been to ask for cooperation.  Could have avoided all this through cooperation? Yes, it's highly likely.  Will anyone "spank" the Feds for this? Hell no.  
The downside to going the cooperation route?  If abuse is really happening in the jail, messages get sent on the sly and everyone is told to "pull in their horns".  Worst case is that deputies retaliate against the informant.
If this were 1950, I'd take those worries seriously, but in my experience, a professional jail anywhere in L.A. takes this type of allegation seriously and they'd have cooperated and not alerted the line operations that the investigation was afoot.
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Bias Isn't Just A Police Problem, It's A Preschool Problem

Bias Isn't Just A Police Problem, It's A Preschool Problem | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
New research from the Yale Child Study Center suggests that many preschool teachers look for disruptive behavior in much the same way: in just one place, waiting for it to appear.

The problem with this strategy (besides it being inefficient), is that, because of implicit bias, teachers are spending too much time watching black boys and expecting the worst.
Rob Duke's insight:
And, this is precisely the argument presented by the ACLU when they suggest that Black communities have been policed "too" much....
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Chris Campbell's comment, Today, 1:56 AM
This is extremely troubling to read about and know that even at such an early age children are singled out due to their race and they are judged by their skin color. This is truly a root problem that can be traced to older delinquency, teachers need to be able to view all their students as equal if they ever expect to teach them about equality and what is right and wrong. There are so many moral issues imbedded in this that it is troubling to think teachers are judging children by appearance and not by behavior.
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Fatal shooting of black man by El Cajon police sparks outrage, protests

Fatal shooting of black man by El Cajon police sparks outrage, protests | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Davis said the man refused multiple instructions from an officer and “concealed his hands in his pockets.” He said the man “drew an object from his front pants pockets, placed both hands together on it and extended toward the officers.”

One officer fired a Taser and another fired rounds from his handgun. No weapon was recovered at the scene.

The shooting sparked protests in the San Diego County city, with friends of the man's family saying he suffers from a mental illness and did not pose a threat to the officers.

The man, who was believed to be age 30, was taken to a hospital with unspecified injuries.

A crowd of about 30 people gathered at the shooting scene. By the evening, the crowd grew to about 100 people, including community leaders and members of local churches.

Most of the demonstrators voiced concerns that the shooting was racially motivated.

The El Cajon violence comes amid growing national debate over police shootings of African Americans. Charlotte was rocked by days of protests last week after police fatally shot 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott.
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David's comment, September 28, 7:53 PM
Once again we see the problem with the shootings. They say it was racially motivated. However, we see African-American officer aiming at the suspect. Where is the logic? I don't agree with police too if their life or other citizens are not in danger why officers used weapons? There are different methods to use on people if they are not obeying officers.
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Conflict Resolution Skills/Alternatives to Violence - FAIRBANKS

Conflict Resolution Skills/Alternatives to Violence - FAIRBANKS | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Basic Workshop: This 18-hour workshop presents conflict resolution skills through experiential learning exercises and practice with the goal of helping Direct Service providers and community members think about and make choices to reduce conflicts in work and everyday settings. The Basic workshop is required before participation in the Advanced workshop. Participants are expected to attend all three days of the workshop.

Date: October 7 - October 9, 2016
Friday, Oct 7      5:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Saturday, Oct 8  9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sunday, Oct 9    9:00 am - 5:00 pm   

Location: AKTC Fairbanks Office
701 Bidwill Avenue, Suite 300
Fairbanks, AK 99701

Cost: $65
Rob Duke's insight:
Some great local training right here in Fairbanks....
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Rob Duke's curator insight, September 26, 10:25 PM
Here's some local training in Fairbanks....
Rob Duke's curator insight, September 26, 10:26 PM
Some great local training right here in Fairbanks....
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Longmont chief fights community distrust with Sunday walks

Longmont chief fights community distrust with Sunday walks | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police departments across the country are keenly aware of community distrust.

Many have responded after incidents like Ferguson and now Charlotte, but far fewer have taken initiative before they ever happened.

The Longmont Police Department fits into the latter category.

“We've walked over 90 neighborhoods within the community,” said police chief Mike Butler as he walked down Lincoln Street on Sunday.

For two and a half years, Butler has dedicated his Sundays to walking around a different neighborhood in Longmont. Some last an hour, others last four, but each includes introducing himself to the people who live there as a way of building relationships within the community.
Rob Duke's insight:
Management By Walking Around (MBWA).  Government can be extremely intimidating and walled off from many of our constituents.  By putting yourself out where they can find your or "accidentally" bump into you is very empowering for your community.  One Chief who taught me had a breakfast spot where you could find him every morning and then he rotated lunch spots so that every group in the community had a "safe" place to meet or run into him without braving the police station.  I adopted his practice and it served me well.
It's important that you institutionalize the system; however, and keep established office hours so that folks who are more structured or connected to the organization also feel like they have access (e.g. employees, elected officials, members of the chamber and other growth engines in your area).
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Justice Department Says No Thanks to Forensic Science Report

Justice Department Says No Thanks to Forensic Science Report | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Common crime lab techniques made famous by shows like Law & Order have come under fire yet again—this time by President Obama’s top scientific advisers. A damning report released this week by the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology calls into question the scientific basis of the forensic analysis of bite marks, mixed DNA samples, hair samples, and footwear, among other techniques. In spite of the esteemed origin of the report, Attorney General Loretta Lynch said the Justice Department wouldn’t heed the findings.

“While we appreciate their contribution to the field of scientific inquiry, the department will not be adopting the recommendations related to the admissibility of forensic science evidence,” Lynch said in a statement.

The brush-off from the nation’s top cop might come as a surprise, but it’s worth noting that prosecutors have relied on evidence garnered by these techniques to win cases for decades. The FBI was also quick to release a statement asserting that the report made many “unsupported assertions” about forensic science. If a growing list of widely accepted forensic analysis techniques is called into question—as it just was—what does that leave prosecutors?

“Juries are unschooled in forensic science and tend to believe the prosecutor’s expert testimony,” Nancy Petro, coauthor of False Justice: Eight Myths That Convict the Innocent, told TakePart. “While the defense’s cross-examination is meant to challenge this testimony, often the defense lacks the resources to do so effectively.”

Rob Duke's insight:
Ain't it funny how the DOJ and FBI are willing to stand around and let local cops be attacked, but when they're asked to drink the koolaid, they balk?
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Howard Cameron's comment, September 25, 5:36 PM
I am confused by your statement Rob. I am not sure where you are coming from and what your reference is about standing around being attacked. Bite marks from my knowledge in the legal field is not valid evidence. The problem is you can always find an "expert" to defend the method. I have seen that in court. Wisconsin has adopted Daubert which helps eliminate the method of both parties throwing everything against the wall and see what sticks in court. I am disappointed that Attorney General Lynch took a I don't care attitude instead of saying at the very minimum we need to review what the report said. Where does this leave the prosecution? It makes them prove their case with better (reliable) and more evidence. Why should any person be convicted by voodoo science?
Rob Duke's comment, September 26, 10:19 PM
No, I'm not commenting on the veracity of the statements about which evidence is problematic. What I'm finding ironic is that attacks are a reasonable reaction to a police system that is perceived to broken, except when the broadside turns to the DOJ and FBI. I do think we're going to need major reforms in the coming years and most times AG Lynch would agree, but not in this case. I'm a political hack and not a legal expert, so I defer on whether or not bite marks for instance are admissible.
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Charlotte police footage shows shooting of Keith Scott

Charlotte police footage shows shooting of Keith Scott | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Charlotte police released dramatic video footage Saturday that shows officers surrounding a black man with his hands at his side before shots are fired and he buckles to the ground.
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Top 10 Best Police Forces in The World

Top 10 Best Police Forces in The World | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Which are the best police forces in the world? Here we have ranked these special police forces in top 10 list.Check these highly trained police units.
Rob Duke's insight:
I don't know if I agree with their list, but ok...
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Austyn Hewitt's comment, September 25, 9:01 PM
I think that this list is all opinion and not really saying who is the best. It's impossible to compare other police forces because people are different all over the world and act different. I do think that all police forces should try to be on a list like this by being the best they can.
Boyd Thomas Branch's comment, September 26, 12:39 AM
I might be a little biased but the Alaska State Troopers should be on the list. Our mission is similar to that of the RCMP. I do not know any state agency who has such a different patrol area and the area be patrolled is certainly it's own force to contend with.
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ACLU Launches Nationwide Investigation into Police Use of Military Technology & Tactics

ACLU Launches Nationwide Investigation into Police Use of Military Technology & Tactics | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Militarization of Local Law Enforcement Erodes Civil Liberties, Encourages Overly Aggressive Policing March 6, 2013 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: (212) 549-2666; media@aclu.org NEW YORK – American Civil Liberties Union affiliates in 23 states...

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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Randy L. Dixon Rivera's curator insight, March 22, 2013 3:14 PM
Libertarian Party NV ‏@lpnevada4h

ACLU Launches Nationwide Investigation into Police Use of Military Technology & Tactics on ACLU -- http://www.aclu.org/criminal-law-reform/aclu-launches-nationwide-investigation-police-use-military-technology-tactics ;… #tlot #ndaa

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Should police officers be required to provide medical aid to people they’ve shot?

Should police officers be required to provide medical aid to people they’ve shot? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Departmental policies vary over when, and how, officers should provide medical aid
Rob Duke's insight:
This isn't easy to answer and there's no one size fits all.  For instance, a guy who is wounded, but still fighting--what do you do?  I'd restrain, handcuff, search.  If he's still uncooperative, it's hard to see a policy or law that says you must render aid.

What about the guy who you just shot 18 times?  Same thing at first: restrain, handcuff, search.  Then?  Well, exactly what am I going to do to render aid to a guy who's been shot in a life-threatening manner.  We don't have the equipment out there in the field to do much.  I've applied tourniquets in the field, applied pressure to wounds, but will I do that if I still think there's a co-conspirator looking to run up behind me?  How about if there's a crowd that wants to lynch me just for doing my job?

I think we can have policy that says: if you can reasonably do so, then you should.  But, I don't think any policy or law is going to be able to account for even the "normal" shooting....so, it's always going to depend on discretion.
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Chris Campbell's comment, September 22, 6:16 PM
Coming from a military perspective in combat we are told to do the same thing as cops, "once the area is clear of opposing threats, aid should be rendered to all wounded on the battle field". Anyone who has been in combat knows that this does not actually happen and knows the reason why. If you are willing to raise your weapon and attempt to take the life of a fellow soldier or officer there is no need for me to attempt to save you. You made your choice and I'll make mine to ensure you never have the ability to make a choice again.
Clarence Kalistook's comment, September 24, 2:47 AM
I do think that police should be required to aid those who have been injured but to an extent. For example, if a police officer has shot a criminal and has done enough damage to almost kill the criminal, then they should have to aid the criminal. Even though they have done wrong, we are all people and some do what they have to, to survive in this cruel world.
Leah Haskell's comment, September 26, 1:48 AM
The reason deadly forced is allowed is because the officer has no other option left to protect themselves and people around the incident. I didn't think after using deadly force, you leave the suspect helpless in the street, that show poor ethics and judgement on ones character. If your going to shoot someone then you should attend them, feel feel to handcuff them but don't leave them in the street.
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Can 1,000 More Officers Solve Chicago's Homicide Problem?

Can 1,000 More Officers Solve Chicago's Homicide Problem? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Over the next two years, the police department will add 516 patrol officers, 92 field-training officers, 112 sergeants, 50 lieutenants and 200 detectives.

The first-year cost will be $138,000 per officer including salary, benefits and supervision. So the 970 additional officers will carry a price tag of almost $134 million.

Police Supt. Eddie Johnson said he has no idea how Emanuel plans to pay for the extra cops.
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