Police Problems and Policy
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Met police received £23m in corporate sponsorship over five years

Met police received £23m in corporate sponsorship over five years | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
UK's biggest police force was given everything from T-shirts to vehicles, freedom of information request reveals (RT @GeorgeMonbiot: When the police take corporate sponsorship, you can kiss goodbye to any notion of impartial policing:
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Jury acquits Erie patrolman of assault charge

Jury acquits Erie patrolman of assault charge | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Justin W. Griffith was accused of kicking handcuffed, prone suspect. Jurors found him not guilty after deliberating less than 30 minutes.

A jury deliberated less than a half an hour Wednesday before finding an Erie police patrolman not guilty of a misdemeanor simple assault charge.

 
After the verdict was read at about 4:20 p.m., a juror approached the patrolman, Justin W. Griffith, outside the Erie County Courthouse.

“I’m sorry you had to go through that,” she said.

The woman, who declined to give her name, said the jurors had agreed on the verdict shortly after starting deliberations late Wednesday afternoon.

Griffith, 36, left the courthouse with family members who had attended the trial since it began Monday. He had been accused of kicking a handcuffed and prone suspect during an Oct. 10 arrest at an apartment in the 2000 block of Wallace Street. Witnesses included fellow officers, some of whom testified they believed Griffith’s actions did not violate departmental policy on use of force.

“The Erie police department has been facing an uphill battle against the gun violence and heroin epidemic that has plagued our community and they have done a great job departmentwide, especially the officers on the street who are subject to those dealings on a daily basis,” Griffith said in a written statement.

“I look forward to getting back in the community to assist with the issues the city has unfortunately been faced with,” the statement said.

Griffith was suspended without pay in December, when the second-degree misdemeanor count of simple assault was held for trial after his preliminary hearing.

Police Chief Donald Dacus said after the verdict that Griffith will remain on unpaid leave....

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Video footage shows Minn. traffic stop that ended with Philando Castile’s death

Video footage shows Minn. traffic stop that ended with Philando Castile’s death | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
New video showed how quickly the deadly encounter unfolded.
Rob Duke's insight:
You be the judge....did the officer react too quickly?
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Michael Brown's parents, Ferguson reach settlement deal in lawsuit

Michael Brown's parents, Ferguson reach settlement deal in lawsuit | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The parents of Michael Brown, who fatal shooting by a white officer sparked protests around the country, reached a deal in a civil suit, according to documents.
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Ray Tensing trial: Jury deliberates fate of ex-Ohio officer in fatal traffic stop shooting

Ray Tensing trial: Jury deliberates fate of ex-Ohio officer in fatal traffic stop shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Ray Tensing is charged with murder and voluntary manslaughter in the 2015 death of Sam Dubose
Rob Duke's insight:
The last trial ended in a hung jury last November...
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Fairbanks Police officers shoot, kill armed man

Fairbanks Police officers shoot, kill armed man | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Officers with the Fairbanks Police Department shot and killed a man Monday morning after he allegedly confronted officers with a gun.

FPD spokesperson Yumi McCulloch said in a statement, “Officers encountered an armed gunman that confronted the officers. Officers returned fire. The suspect died at the scene.”

According to McCulloch, the shooting happened in a non-residential part of Fairbanks, shortly before 4 a.m.

The officers involved were not hurt.
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Man Shoots Two Officers with Lighting Speed

Man Shoots Two Officers with Lighting Speed | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Body camera footage captures the moment a suspect pulls a gun and shoots two Georgia officers.
Rob Duke's insight:
This is a good example of why: 1. one officer pat's down for weapons; then, gets the info to run warrants; 2. even when the first officer backs off to run the warrant check, the second officer remains away and (preferably behind cover) watching, but not talking to the suspect.  If you do this, then the guy will have a tough time getting shots off against the officers.
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Joe Dugan's comment, June 18, 6:40 PM
I see what you are saying professor Duke. However, being on different internships, and many ride along's, I have seen this behavior where they go right up to the suspect and make them take their hands out of their pockets. We can see in the background, right before the shooting, the officer in the background was either running information or doing something else, but was not paying close enough attention to his partner.
Phillip Hill's curator insight, June 19, 12:52 AM
After reviewing this blog, I immediately found fault within the officer’s proper protocol and procedure. With this said, every department has different protocol and procedures that law enforcement must obey and follow through. In this instance. The first initial officer ran the vehicle plate number and the vehicle came back reported stolen. Immediately the first officer should have waited for backup to arrive so there are two or three more officers to potentially apprehend a suspect that has stolen a vehicle. The video indicates that the second officer arrived on scene in which the suspect immediately had his hands directly in his pockets. I believe this is a fault of the first officer for the first officer should have never subjected himself to a suspect that has potentially stolen a vehicle, to initially have their hands in their pockets. In this instance, the officer should have waited for backup and then the officers should have approached the vehicle with caution due to the nature that the vehicle was reported stolen. This is not a matter of race upon the suspect, this is a matter of proper procedure and protocol upon approaching a reported stolen vehicle, and successfully detaining the suspect upon investigation.
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Kansas City officer’s death was not ‘planned ambush against police,’ officials say

Kansas City officer’s death was not ‘planned ambush against police,’ officials say | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The officer became the 31st officer shot and killed by a suspect so far this year.
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Police say cameras installed in at-risk Kansas City neighborhood already paying dividends

Police say cameras installed in at-risk Kansas City neighborhood already paying dividends | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Seeing is believing. Police in Kansas City are using a brand new series of surveillance cameras which have been installed in a neighborhood that's been labeled as being at-risk for a long time. An extra set of eyes are already making a difference.
Rob Duke's insight:
The deterrence factor at work.  Interesting that Kansas City is where Kelling & Wilson claimed to have proven that deterrence didn't work--what do you think?  Am I distorting the study?
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Oakland recruiting ex-cons to oversee cops

Oakland recruiting ex-cons to oversee cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Former cops need not apply, but former inmates are being encouraged by the city of Oakland to apply for slots on the city’s new police commission.

A notice recently posted on the city’s website for would-be commissioners says, “Must be an Oakland resident. Must be at least 18 years old. Formerly incarcerated individuals encouraged to apply.”

Barry Donelan, head of the Oakland Police Officers Association, said recruiting ex-cons to help select the chief and discipline officers for misconduct was “extremely distasteful.”

And what really bugs the cops is that the voter-approved measure creating the commission bars current and former Oakland cops from serving, as well as police union employees.
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Teen Accused Of Killing Deputy: 'I'd Rather Run Than Get Caught By A Cop'

Teen Accused Of Killing Deputy: 'I'd Rather Run Than Get Caught By A Cop' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Geer responded to 911 reports of a masked man with a gun near Grand Junction’s city limits around 11 a.m. When Deputy Geer contacted Holzer the teenage suspect allegedly resisted arrest and tried to run. Geer, who responded alone, pinned Holzer to the ground and administered his Taser, according to witness accounts. After being tased, Holzer reached into his pocket and shot Geer at close range. The deputy was struck four times.

In his statement to investigators, Holzer may have been suicidal and tried killing himself before shooting Deputy Geer.

“I’d rather run than get caught by a cop,” said Holzer. “That’s why I wanted him to shoot me. I knew I was going to jail. I was like, ‘Just shoot me, please, just please.’”

Holzer gave several varying but similar accounts of what happened in the shooting. He was a habitual drug offender and says he used meth just days before the incident. The shooter says he tried to kill himself before shooting Geer.

“…he’s like, ‘Yes you are (being detained),’ and that’s when he tased me and then I had my hand on my belt,” Holzer told investigators. “I could not get my hand out of my pants and off my belt and he kept yelling at me and telling me to, so that’s when I decided to shoot myself. It didn’t work and at that point, I tried to pull the gun out and shoot him.”
Rob Duke's insight:
More on the case of a deputy who died while trying to use less-than-lethal force on a teenager.
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Arkansas Police Officer Shot And Killed

Arkansas Police Officer Shot And Killed | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Newport (AR) police confirm one of their officers has been shot and killed in the line of duty.
Authorities are now searching for a suspect in connection with the shooting.
Arkansas State Police confirmed that 41-year-old Lieutenant Patrick Weatherford was shot and killed near the Remmel Park area in Newport.
Lt. Weatherford was a 15-year veteran of the Newport police force.
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Tulsa police kill man armed with knives after mental health call

Tulsa police kill man armed with knives after mental health call | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A mental health call turned into a deadly shooting in Oklahoma when three law enforcement officers confronted a knife-wielding man outside a convenience store, the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office said.

Two deputies and one Tulsa police officer opened fire and shot 29-year-old Joshua Barre on Friday morning. He was taken to a hospital, where he later died, the sheriff's office said.
"My son was mentally ill and they didn't have to kill my son," Barre's mother, Etta Jones Barre, told CNN affiliate KTUL. "They could have done something different."
"He was probably frightened for his life, but my son was not a violent person," she said.
Deputies with the county's mental health team had gone to Barre's home earlier Friday to take him into custody for a mental health evaluation.
But when they arrived, a neighbor told them Barre was in the street holding two large knives, the sheriff's office said.
Rob Duke's insight:
We handle these calls every day and most of the time, people get the help they need....
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Phillip Hill's curator insight, June 19, 1:12 AM
This blog is a tough one to initiate my comments and feedback. It is hard to decipher some time as a law enforcement personnel the mental capabilities of individuals. There are certain training's and programs that officers undergo to be aware of knowledgeable disability factors among individuals. This extensive training undergoes multiple different characteristics among people that may have or possess mental disabilities. Not all officers are aware if individuals possess a disability or not, but officers need to be educated and aware of potential disabilities among individuals. In this instance, this man was labeled as disabled and had severe mental problematic developments. Unfortunately, his life was taken with the aspects of using a knife in threatening gestures as a result of frustration, confusion, and potential disability complications. I myself have come across disabled people within the past and typically I would give the disabled individuals the benefit of the doubt or discontinue the engagement because I felt there was no standard of intellectual communication between myself and the apparent disabled individuals.
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How Insurance Companies Can Force Bad Cops Off the Job

How Insurance Companies Can Force Bad Cops Off the Job | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In exchange for coverage, insurers can demand that police departments implement new policies and training, and dismiss problem officers.
Rob Duke's insight:
The people who write for the Atlantic are members of the media, but they're not journalists.  This is a classic example of the sloppiness that supports their slanted reporting:
1. California agencies are all "self-insured"; but they join together in mutual defense leagues through a legislative device called a Joint-Powers Authority (or JPA for short).  A JPA is a new government entity that includes representatives of all member agencies.  You can't just kick out a member--it's akin to kicking Rhode Island out of the U.S. (though, I have seen agencies secede).  They could, however, vote to raise problem cities' deductibles or raise their rates.  A JPA, generally, offers discounts on their member rates if they implement certain policies and training, but won't go so far as to say "fire so and so, or else".  Employees have a right to due process and, in California, cops are protected by a "Bill of Rights" that ensures that they are investigated by professional investigators (or attorneys).
2. Irwindale only has 1400 residents, so, yes, it's small, but it's also an industrial city, which means it's actually a fairly wealthy town.
3. Lastly, JPA's act to limit its members' liability, which means they tend towards settling suits, which may or may not indicate an officer was wrong.  Every officer, on every day, has some risk of encountering a situation that may lead to litigation.  The chances of these cases showing wrongdoing on an officer's part that meets a legal standard that can survive due process is low, because most officers really are putting in a good faith effort to do their job.  However, in each of these cases, there is a very high likelihood that the agency, or the JPA, will make a civil remedy offer that they figure is lower than the cost of merely fighting the lawsuit (and, doesn't carry the risk of losing and having to pay whatever the jury/judge awards to the plaintiff).  These are utilitarian decisions that may, or may not reflect a legal, moral, or ethical equivalent of "wrongdoing" on the part of the officer(s) involved.
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Basketball Cop Foundation

A 501c3 non-profit organization on a mission to improve Police/Youth/Community relations nationwide.
Rob Duke's insight:
This is the first thing (or something like it) that we should be doing in every community. Basketball may not be right for your town, but skatepark or baseball or whatever your kids like to do....it creates relationships and builds up soft power...or smart power...which is available to power the community through times when you were forced to use hard power.
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Officer Found Not Guilty in Milwaukee Police Shooting That Sparked Unrest

Officer Found Not Guilty in Milwaukee Police Shooting That Sparked Unrest | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Dominique Heaggan-Brown, the former Milwaukee police officer who fatally shot Sylville Smith during an August 2016 foot chase, was found not guilty of first-degree reckless homicide on Wednesday. Members of Smith's family could be heard crying in court as the verdict was read.
Rob Duke's insight:
The attorney for the family is going to build a civil case against this officer because of 16 use of force incidents?  That was a couple month's work when I was working the street in San Berdoo County....
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NFL's Kaepernick Compares Cops to Fugitive Slave Patrols

NFL's Kaepernick Compares Cops to Fugitive Slave Patrols | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick compared police officers to fugitive slave patrolmen after a Minnesota officer was acquitted in the shooting death of a black motorist.
Rob Duke's insight:
We just read the history--is this a fair statement?
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Police: Mother of 4 killed by officers was wielding knife

Police: Mother of 4 killed by officers was wielding knife | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A pregnant mother of four was shot and killed by Seattle police after she confronted officers with a knife, authorities said Sunday.
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Parisian police targeted again in suspected terror attack

Parisian police targeted again in suspected terror attack | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Paris was hit Monday by yet another suspected terror attack — this time involving a motorist who was killed after he plowed his car into a police convoy heading down the Champs-Elysees.

The incident happened around 3:45 p.m. local time and police smashed the windows of the vehicle to drag the motorist out and used fire extinguishers to douse the flames.
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Toms River Police Cleared In 'Suicide By Cop' Attempt: Prosecutor

Toms River Police Cleared In 'Suicide By Cop' Attempt: Prosecutor | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The state attorney general's office says Toms River police officers were justified when they shot a man in the dark in October after he first called 911 to report a man with a gun to draw their response and then pointed a television remote them pretending it was a firearm.
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john's comment, June 18, 8:49 AM
Looks like the defendant was at an all time low. He traveled to meet his girlfriend and became homeless once things did not work out. I havent heard any solid arguments that this was not a justified shooting given the circumstances. I think if he was younger like in that police shooting involving the young teen with the bb gun it could of been a similar story. I thought an interesting piece to add is how often does suicide by cop occur? Has it been increasing over the last few years or what?
Joe Dugan's comment, June 18, 6:36 PM
This truly has to be the situation every officer dreads. I also wonder if this is an increasing theme that we are going to see. As the media increases their stance on officers being trigger happy, I wonder if this will drive more people in tough situations that see no other way out to go this route. This not only hurts the suspect, but in many cases can have a detrimental effect on the police officer as well.
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Minnesota officer fired from police force after acquittal in Philando Castile shooting

Minnesota officer fired from police force after acquittal in Philando Castile shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Minnesota police officer accused of fatally shooting a black man last summer has been fired after he was found not guilty of second-degree manslaughter.

Philando Castile, 32, was shot several times by St. Anthony Police Officer Jeronimo Yanez, who is Latino, last July after Castile was pulled over with his girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, and Reynolds' 4-year-old daughter in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, a suburb of Saint Paul.

The city of St. Anthony said in a statement that the "public will be best served if Officer Yanez is no longer a police officer in our city." The city will offer Yanez a "voluntary separation agreement" to help him transition to another career, it said.

After the verdict was announced, Castile's family addressed the media, applauding the efforts of Special Prosecutor Don Lewis and his team.

"I don't know what more could have been done," said Castile family attorney Glenda Hatchett. "I am disappointed. My heart breaks for this family. My heart breaks for this nation."

Philando Castile's mother, Valerie Castile, said she was "mad as hell" with the verdict and called Yanez a "murderer."

"The system continues to fail all black people," she said.
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3 Teen Cadets Suspected of Stealing LAPD Patrol Vehicles May Have Also Impersonated Officers: Chief

3 Teen Cadets Suspected of Stealing LAPD Patrol Vehicles May Have Also Impersonated Officers: Chief | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Three teen police cadets are in custody on suspicion of having stolen LAPD black-and-white patrol vehicles and they may have also impersonated police officers, Chief Charlie Beck said Thursday.


One of two pursuits involving stolen police cruisers is seen on June 14, 2017. (Credit: KTLA)
Investigators realized two cruisers were missing about 5 p.m. Wednesday, and immediately focused their suspicions on a 16-year-old female cadet assigned to 77th Street Division, Beck said.

At 9:30 p.m., the two missing vehicles were located, being driven in tandem within the station’s patrol area. The drivers refused to pull over for police, Beck said.

A chase began, with the vehicles ultimately going different directions. Both vehicles crashed and the occupants were taken into custody – the two drivers and a passenger.
Rob Duke's insight:
An early end to a law enforcement career....
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john's comment, June 18, 8:36 AM
What an interesting article to read. Id like to know how long this program has been in place and how many agencies are using a similar programs for youths in other cities. I read that the program will be reviewed in the near future and would like to know the findings once it has been reviewed. I also thought I found some Internal controls here because whenever an officer uses a vehicle it is tracked and the cadets were able to dismantle the tracking system and used another officers name. I think this can be a weakness but this was not a common occurrence.
Phillip Hill's curator insight, June 19, 1:03 AM
I am a little bit confused and shocked with this blog, at the same time. As a former ex-military police officer, I do not foresee how a 15, 16, and 17-year-old are cadets at the Los Angeles Police Department. In my time of service to our United States military, people had to be minimum of 18 years of age to be enlisted and accepted into all military branch services. Now with this said, an individual can be 17 in their junior or senior year in high school while applying for military services, and having the services initiated upon their 18th birthday. These cadets were apparently able to use an off-duty police officer's credentials to check out the Los Angeles police vehicles and use them for joyriding purposes. The officers that were assigned to the police cruisers were initially on vacation. Some new judicial rules are written every year in which each initial state does change its judicial laws set forth. Apparently LAPD is allowing minors at the age of 15, to potentially joined the LAPD police force as a training in cadet. This surprises me for the minimum age of even acceptance into any military or law enforcement agency, should be 18 at all times.
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Manhunt: Georgia inmates kill 2 guards, carjack to freedom

The victims were identified as Christopher Monica, 42, and Curtis Billue, 58. Putnam County Sheriff Howard Sills told reporters: "I saw two brutally murdered corrections officers."
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Warrant: Teen Austin Holzer Told Deputy He Killed, "You're Gonna Get F*ckin' Shot"

Warrant: Teen Austin Holzer Told Deputy He Killed, "You're Gonna Get F*ckin' Shot" | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
authorities have released arrest documents issued in Holzer's name; they're also shared here. The report reveals that Holzer had an active warrant in his name for an unspecified sex offense, and was listed as a runaway.

The account describes him as a meth-using gangster wannabe and quotes him as saying he wanted Geer to kill him and was disappointed that he used a Taser instead.

While speaking to authorities, the teen insisted that his first instinct was to shoot himself — but when that didn't work, he chose to fire at Geer instead, striking him three times in the face.
Rob Duke's insight:
The Deputy in this case (Colorado) tried to talk the teen down and was killed.
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Joe Dugan's comment, June 18, 6:46 PM
What was this officer to do? Should he have used lethal force right away? We can always "Monday night quarterback" these situations, however, at that moment we will never know what the real situation was. Sad turn of events, instead of just wasting his life, this kid turns around and ruins this officers life, and the life of his kids. We all know that every officer is ready to lay down their life to protect us citizens, still is sad to here these kids now have to grow up w/o a father, because of some wanna be punk who wanted to live the gangsta life but was too scared to go to prison.
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Taser lawsuit against deputies is thrown out

Taser lawsuit against deputies is thrown out | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A federal judge has thrown out an excessive force lawsuit brought by a Cedar Rapids man who was Tasered while trying to flee sheriff’s deputies during a burglary at the county landfill in 2014.

Jason John Hall, 39, took Black Hawk County and four deputies to court alleging the Taser shock caused him to fall several feet onto a concrete floor and resulted in permanent physical damage.

Attorneys for the sheriff’s office said in court records Hall was on a storage cabinet and was shocked when he jumped at a deputy while holding a mini crowbar.

The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in Cedar Rapids last year. On Tuesday, Judge Linda Reade sided with the county and deputies after Hall’s attorney declined to resist a motion to dismiss the case as a matter of law.

“In sum, the record, even when viewed in the light most favorable to the plaintiff, fails to establish a genuine issue of material fact with regard to all of the plaintiff’s claims,” Reade wrote in dismissing the suit.
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Police Chief recommends officers employment be terminated

Police Chief recommends officers employment be terminated | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Omaha Police Chief Todd Schmaderer spoke Friday to address the in-custody death of Zachary Bearheels on Monday, June 5. Schmaderer revealed that he recommended that two of the four officers involved have their employment terminated.
Rob Duke's insight:
The questions to be asking are:
1. Did they have probable cause to detain?  It sounds like they did since he had been determined to be an at-risk adult who was in the system as missing.
2. Did he resist enough to warrant using handcuffs?  It sounds like they were prudent to do so.  I've often handcuffed (and searched) someone who wasn't under arrest, but who was going to be sitting behind me in a patrol car--usually if they gave me some cause--always if they were under detention.
3. After he was handcuffed, did he begin fighting? And, did that warrant using the Taser or other force?  It sounds like it did.
4. After using the Taser, did the fight get so intense that officers were in fear for their safety or the safety of a fellow officer? It sounds like they were.
5. If not for using the Taser, would they have had to resort to some other more deadly use of force (e.g. batons, neck restraint, etc.)?  We don't know, but the description makes it sound as if it had become a brawl with the guy even slipping out of one cuff.  A one cuffed suspect now has a potentially deadly weapon on this wrist when he begins swinging that handcuff (imagine a cuff that is half open with the jagged edge being swung at officers).
6. Was it such a free-for-all that officers were triggered into survival mode?  If so, I'm not sure that a 3 Tase and stop policy was reasonable...

Having said that: I know why the Chief might fire these officers and it has everything to do with a utilitarian analysis about BLM or other protesters tearing up the city.  Better to put two officers off, even if they later win back their jobs, than to have millions of dollars of damage and lives at risk.  Also, the Chief may be worried about his own political survival if he doesn't terminate.  I'm not saying any of that is right or correct, but that's a practical analysis.
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