Police Problems and Policy
9.8K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Rob Duke
onto Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

WWYD? - Racial Profiling: Hispanics 2

These are the last ones to be put up as the rest you can find elsewhere on yt or on their site now that it's on hiatus. In this scene we are shown how custom...
more...
No comment yet.
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Dirt bike rider critically injured in chase with Cleveland police spotlights ongoing Bike Life debate

Dirt bike rider critically injured in chase with Cleveland police spotlights ongoing Bike Life debate | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A 20-year-old dirt bike rider suffered critical injuries Monday night after Cleveland police chased him through city streets, police say.

The incident comes less than two weeks after Mayor Frank Jackson and Cleveland police Chief Calvin Williams announced a multi-pronged approach to tackling the issue of riders illegally operating off-road vehicles on Cleveland's roads.

"The policy has been to not come out ... and chase a dirt bike with a car. Nobody is going to win in that situation. It just puts everybody's life at risk," Williams said during a May 16 press conference with Jackson.

Cleveland police policy prohibits officers from using their zone cars to chase dirt bike riders -- but it doesn't bar police from using police motorcycles to chase riders, Cleveland police spokeswoman Sgt. Jennifer Ciaccia said.

Ciaccia said the department's bikes are larger street-legal versions of a dirt bike the city originally bought for last year's Republican National Convention.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Fairbanks police shoot, kill suspect following pursuit near Fairbanks

Alaska State Troopers say a man wanted on warrants tried to elude law enforcement near Fairbanks Thursday, and the pursuit ended in gunfire that killed the suspect.

At 3:14 p.m. Thursday, troopers in Fairbanks spotted a person they said had "known warrants" and tried to pull the vehicle over.

AST Lt. Brian Wassmann said during a press conference in Fairbanks streamed live on Facebook that troopers saw the man driving a white truck in the area of Easy Street and Old Richardson Highway.

Troopers tried to pull the man over but he did not stop, prompting a pursuit down the highway toward North Pole, Wassmann said. The chase continued on the highway to Badger Road, where the suspect turned around and started driving toward Fairbanks, he said.

"Witnesses reported to the troopers that the suspect fired a gun at pursuing troopers during the pursuit," Wassmann said. The lieutenant did not specify when the shots were fired.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Man Shot Dead in Compton in Exchange of Gunfire With 2 Deputies, Who Were Injured: LASD

Man Shot Dead in Compton in Exchange of Gunfire With 2 Deputies, Who Were Injured: LASD | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it


A man was fatally shot after opening fire on two sheriff's deputies, who were left injured in the exchange of gunfire late Wednesday in Compton, authorities said.


A gunman was killed, and two deputies were injured, Wednesday evening in a deputy-involved shooting in Compton. (Credit: KTLA)
At around 11:40 p.m. deputies tried to pull over a white sedan in the 900 block of North Santa Fe Avenue.

The car didn't initially stop, and the deputies could see three people inside the vehicle, according to a news release from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.

After one of the deputies opened the car's rear passenger door, an armed passenger fired at the deputy, who returned fire. The man then fired on the second deputy, who also returned fire.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Outright Lies Grease Passage of Bill That Eliminates Mandatory Gun Enhancements

Regardless of how you feel about the legislation, we are disturbed, and every legislator should be disturbed, that a witness called to testify in support of Senate Bill 620 told multiple lies to the California Senate.  Kim McGill of the Youth Justice Coalition sat next to the bill author, Senator Steven Bradford, as she addressed the Public Safety Committee on April 25, 2017.  McGill claimed, "one case in particular, stands out" to exemplify the unfairness of mandatory gun enhancements and then detailed the "facts" of a robbery case involving Travis Manning.
 
Ms. McGill testified that Manning was a 19-year-old man who had never been arrested.  According to McGill, he entered a GameStop, asked for a $100 game while holding a BB gun, and then took the same game back to GameStop a month later, not understanding the consequences of his act.  McGill claimed the sentencing judge "stated under California law he could not make any adjustments due to Travis' cognitive disabilities or his lack of a past criminal record." PBS NewsHour, relying upon McGill and Senator Bradford's information, repeated these statements in a story where Manning was made the "poster child" for SB 620.
 
The actual facts show McGill lied to the Senate Committee.  On the day he robbed the GameStop, Manning was a 23-year-old convicted felon. His criminal history included possession of cocaine base for sale.  The jury found -- and it was affirmed on appeal -- that Manning pulled out and cocked a real gun while committing the robbery.  Manning did not request a "$100 game" as McGill testified but demanded and received a Wii console, games, accessories, as well as the $600-700 in the cash register. 
 
Ms. McGill also did not tell the truth about Manning's actions after the robbery.  He did not take the "same game" back to GameStop. Instead, on two separate occasions Manning sold portions of the stolen loot to another GameStop store. This was not a misunderstood youth.  Mr. Manning was a felon who after committing robbery then committed a burglary by entering a business to sell property he had stolen at gunpoint. The connection was finally made when the store clerks from two different locations independently identify Manning.
 
Finally, Ms. McGill was dishonest in her description of the judge's remarks which she embellished to support her key point--that inflexible sentencing laws led to Manning's sentence. Clearly the judge never claimed he could not adjust the sentence despite Manning's "lack of a past criminal record," since Manning did have a prior record at the time he committed the robbery. Mr. Manning was on active probation with a prior felony conviction (Case number MA029937) when he committed the robbery and that led to his being charged and convicted of being a felon with a firearm. (Case number TA095435)
 
Equally importantly, the sentence length proved McGill was dishonest when she purported to quote the judge.  This is the point that first caused us to take notice of her claims.  As Ms. McGill was weaving her tale about the judge's statement, anybody who understands sentencing laws (be they prosecutor, defense attorney, or legislator sitting on the Public Safety Committee) should have instantly recognized without even knowing the facts of the case that McGill's tale did not ring true.
 
The sentence length for the crimes charged reflected that the judge had selected the longer of possible terms for Manning's sentence.  California law allowed the sentencing judge to run Manning's convictions for two robberies and a burglary concurrently, resulting in a shorter prison sentence than the 18 years imposed.  Instead, the sentence length reflected consecutive sentences, emphatically disproving McGill's recitation that the sentencing judge stated California law precluded a reduced sentence length.
 
We believe that McGill's misstatements were deliberate and calculated.  According to her own words when she testified, she was involved in the Manning case before his trial and sentencing.  Ms. McGill stated to the committee that she helped Manning get a new lawyer pending trial, "packed the court," and coordinated the presentation of "several powerful testimonies" at sentencing.
 
It is shocking that Ms. McGill felt comfortable sitting next to Senator Bradford while calmly uttering false statements during public testimony to a Senate Committee.  Also alarming is that when the ADDA contacted PBS reporter Kamala Kelkar to request a correction of her inaccurate story, we were informed that Senator Bradford's office repeated McGill's false statements about Manning, including the absurd claim that he had no prior record.  Didn't the Senator or anybody on his staff wonder how Manning was convicted of being a felon in possession of a gun if he had never been convicted of a prior felony?  Why didn't the Senator or his staff verify any of the facts of the case they chose to use as the "poster child" for the need to overturn mandatory gun enhancements?  The information is, after all, public record.
 
Criminal justice reform advocates who wish to take the system to task should remember that in criminal trials, the standard of proof is beyond a reasonable doubt, and that everything is documented in the public record.  If you misrepresent the facts that are in the public record, we will know. This sordid episode points out the need for legislators and the media to carefully vet the stories and ideas being peddled in furtherance of "criminal justice reform."
Rob Duke's insight:
Is this merely typical politics or is this Muir's dangerous abuse of the Power of the Word (persuasion)?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

DeKalb sheriff suspends himself after indecency arrest

DeKalb sheriff suspends himself after indecency arrest | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
DeKalb Sheriff Jeff Mann says he's not guilty of exposing himself and running from police, but he suspended himself for a week under his code of conduct.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Man tasered by police dies in hospital after 'slashing himself'

Man tasered by police dies in hospital after 'slashing  himself' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

A man has died following an incident in which he was tasered by police.

Reports last night said he was "slashing himself" with a knife in Falmouth.

The police have just issue
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Police chief resigns when confronted about his involvement in “mock tickets”

Police chief resigns when confronted about his involvement in “mock tickets” | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Fox 2 News learned from Ware that the tickets demanding payment were just pretend. Ware called them “mock tickets.” Uplands Park and Kinloch even called them “warnings,” but you wouldn’t know it just by looking at them.

So why would a police chief in one town get involved with speed traps in another municipality? The Fox Files obtained a document which offers a clue. It's Colonel Cliff Ware's resume from 2015. He listed a current employer as Automated Transportation Enforcement Solutions (ATES ). Ware listed that he was paid by “commission” and supervised by John Baine, the man behind the security cop radar operation.

Baine told Fox 2 News in April that his critics were all wrong about the speed trap operation.

“They have an agenda and what we offer the small communities is an opportunity for equal protection,” he said.
Rob Duke's insight:
In later readings, we'll see that one of the things Muir cautions against is focusing too hard on the power of the sword (coercion).  This article and video is a good example of this: everyone focuses on the police (moonlighting cop, in this case) and no one asks what the attorneys got out of the case.  The ticket company offers a service where they write "warning" tickets and the attorneys were paid to stop this from happening.  Attorneys that get into the fight are also part of the problem.  There's certainly a public policy issue about using a company to write warnings when the warnings look a little too much like tickets, but the attorneys also got paid for getting involved.
So, the power of persuasion (word) in this case is also suspect, but we focused on coercion and not on the word.
Muir also cautions to be careful of the power of the purse (reciprocity).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The County: the story of America's deadliest police

The County: the story of America's deadliest police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Guardian series examines Kern County, California, where police have killed more people per capita than anywhere else in the US this year
Rob Duke's insight:
a. the Atlantic is very liberal, thus you must take their articles with that in mind;
b. California has the largest population and the most officers in the U.S.; and\
c. I worked the central valley and it's as violent as Los Angeles--if not more so.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Shared sacrifice and real compromise save the Dallas police pension — for now | Editorials | Dallas News

Shared sacrifice and real compromise save the Dallas police pension — for now | Editorials | Dallas News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Victory has a hundred fathers, the saying goes, so there’s a lot of credit to pass around for the rescue of the Dallas Police and Fir
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Dashcams capture moment before accused serial killer's deadly shootout with Anchorage police

In the video, James Dale Ritchie can be seen ignoring police officer Arn Salao's commands to stop. Suddenly, he turns and walks toward Salao's patrol car.
Rob Duke's insight:
Would you bar officers from making these "investigative stops"?  The ACLU makes an argument that these are not Constitutional--what do you think?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Caught On Video: Woman, 76, Forcibly Removed From Union Station Reserved Seats

Caught On Video: Woman, 76, Forcibly Removed From Union Station Reserved Seats | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A woman was caught on video being forcibly removed from reserved seating at Union Station, and the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department says they are investigating the arrest.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

FBI is not involved in Seth Rich case despite 'conspiracy theories,' officials say

FBI is not involved in Seth Rich case despite 'conspiracy theories,' officials say | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FBI is not involved in Seth Rich case despite 'conspiracy theories,' officials say
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Connecticut House Unanimously Approves Conviction Requirement for Civil Forfeiture - Institute for Justice

Connecticut House Unanimously Approves Conviction Requirement for Civil Forfeiture - Institute for Justice | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Between 2009 and 2013, local and state law enforcement carried out 3,750 civil forfeiture cases—more than three-quarters of all forfeiture cases.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Police: Spike in Seattle shootings driven by gang grudges

Police: Spike in Seattle shootings driven by gang grudges | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Rather than traditional gang battles, police are dealing with retaliatory shootings set off by personal disputes. They plan to counteract the violence by increasing patrols and targeting the most dangerous offenders.
Rob Duke's insight:
Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Danville bank robbery suspect didn’t stand out as police officer

Danville bank robbery suspect didn’t stand out as police officer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Placentia police spokesman said Jennifer Rae McClary, suspected of robbing the bank while wearing a painted-on beard, did not survive her probationary period as an officer.
Rob Duke's insight:
There's a reason that she's an ex-officer....but we often release officers on probation without "cause" due to liability of proving another reason.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

'Star Wars': Why Darth Vader wasn't truly a villain

'Star Wars': Why Darth Vader wasn't truly a villain | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
And why the Jedi weren't as good as advertised.
Rob Duke's insight:
This article is a good mix-up to go along with one of Bittner's articles about the Police as a "tainted profession".  Bittner argues that we do bad things as well as good, thus we're tainted.  He puts us in the same category as dentists and doctors.  Whether we like to admit it or not, we sometimes make utilitarian decisions (often without full information) and that eats into our own Virtue Ethics.
Let me know your thoughts....I'm open to the idea that justice and policing may be on the verge of a new meaning or at least a new ethics....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Video appears to show Texas officer striking teenage girl

Video appears to show Texas officer striking teenage girl | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
 The San Antonio Police Department is reviewing police body camera footage after a bystander posted vide
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Suspect in vehicle break-ins shot by Anchorage officer

The suspect wasn't stopped by a stun gun and was wielding a hatchet, police said.
Rob Duke's insight:
Remember the hatchet used to be called a tomahawk....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

St. Louis police are overcharging public for arrest reports, judge rules

St. Louis police are overcharging public for arrest reports, judge rules | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The St. Louis Police Department has been violating the state’s open records law by overcharging for and improperly maintaining police reports, a St. Louis judge has ruled.

St. Louis Circuit Judge Robert Dierker’s order in a lawsuit filed last year by the American Civil Liberties Union says the department has violated the law by requiring citizens pay a flat fee of $6.50 for each police report and failing to distinguish between an “incident report” and an “arrest report.”

Dierker’s order says the department must start providing arrest reports to the public at 10 cents a page plus the cost of a staff member’s time to produce them.

The judge said “the department was attempting to charge an unnecessarily high fee for producing records because the department chose not to keep records in a manner conforming” to the Sunshine Law.

City counselor Michael Garvin said the department has staff assigned solely to handle an “enormous” volume of Sunshine Law requests, and the practice of charging a flat fee was so the department didn’t have to calculate a separate fee for each request.

“We weren’t trying to gouge the public,” Garvin said. “This really was intended to make it easier for everyone. Obviously, we’ll have to comply with the judge’s ruling. The law isn’t always convenient. I guess this is going to be one of those cases.”

The lawsuit was filed last June by the ACLU after the department charged Mustafa Abdullah, an ACLU employee, a fee of $1,377 for 138 arrest reports he had requested. The suit said the fee the department quoted was $897 for the reports — $6.50 each regardless of the number of pages — plus a prepayment of $480 for an estimated 32 hours of research time needed to strip out some information.
Rob Duke's insight:
Another case of Power of the Purse and Power of the Word.
$6.50 for a police report isn't an unfair burden.  The judge requires a calculation for each report, but it's equally reasonable to say: ok, for most report requests, it's a matter of they all take about the same time: 5 min. to search; 2 min. to print, plus .10 a page for the paper....but, what about the time that we pay the person(s) to sit around at the counter waiting for people to come in?  Shouldn't the report requesters pay a fair share for the electricity, building costs, and salary of the person who fills that position?  In which case, wouldn't it be reasonable to say, we calculate that as .10 a page, plus $6 for overhead and we'll round it off to a flat $6.50?

We charged $10 for traffic accidents and tow reports, and research for multiple cases.  This seems like a reasonable policy to me.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Greenville police credit Cops and Barbers program with improved community relations

Greenville police credit Cops and Barbers program with improved community relations | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police and community relations have been in the spotlight a lot in recent years, especially with the black community.

In Eastern Carolina, police in one city say there's been a big improvement all thanks to a program started last summer.

Beyond a shave or a haircut, the local barbershop has also always served as a place for people to gather and have an open conversation about real-life problems.

That is why Greenville officers felt it was the perfect place to begin an outreach, known as Cops and Barbers, with the end goal of improving communications.

"All the issues that our customers have problems with, they have been addressed during one of our meetings and the officers try their best to take a look at the issue and to put the best solution they have to it," says Rodney Harris, the manager at Rodney's Barber Shop.

Since the program started in July of 2016, 11 barbershops in total have joined in, hanging maps that explain where and why police monitor certain areas and passing out little cards to patrons that have tips and advice on how to handle being stopped by an officer.


Now barbers are serving as an intermediary between the community and the police.

"It's paying dividends for us," says Chief Mark Holtzman, with the Greenville Police Department.

Chief Holtzman says the program has been working. Complaints against officers in the communities they serve are down this year, something they directly attribute to the program.

They believe going forward, the most important thing will be keeping an open dialog.

"I see the program growing by leaps and bounds, once the community gets to know what we're doing, hopefully they'll start bringing more issues to the table," says Officer Richie Williams, who is in charge of Cops and Barbers Community Outreach.

As for the community, the program has allowed for a more honest conversation to take place, providing an outlet for people to express their concerns, sharing experiences they've had and offering feedback as to how they feel.

"To me, as people, our job is to be treated... treat them with respect so they can treat you with respect, and in the long run, let's just all get along," says Rubye Harris, a community member.

As for the Cops and Barbers program, police say this is just the beginning.

During the meeting, officers also shared with community members a number of initiatives they're introducing to better serve the area, including body cameras that all officers will soon be wearing and a fair and impartial police training program they have enrolled in.
Rob Duke's insight:
This looks to be very innovative...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Why California Is a Case Study for Monitoring Police Misconduct

Why California Is a Case Study for Monitoring Police Misconduct | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

One policy currently being debated among police-reform advocates is the adoption of a statute that would allow state attorneys general to investigate and mandate structural changes within troubled departments, just as the federal Justice Department can. These changes can vary, but could include amending a department’s use-of-force policy or requiring bias training. The proposal has its origins in California, as it is the only state in the country that explicitly authorizes its attorney general to intervene in this way.

William Lockyer was the first California attorney general to exercise that power, after four Riverside police officers shot and killed a 19-year-old black woman in 1998. The shooting ignited community protests and attracted attention from civil-rights activists Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson. The Riverside County district attorney invited Lockyer to review the evidence and circumstances of the case.

“I think it makes sense to have some external review, whether federal or state, as a way to check local politics and pressures.”
Though the state did not have enough to bring criminal charges against the officers, Lockyer told me, he launched a civil-rights investigation into the Riverside Police Department’s policies and practices. In 2001, he filed a judgment forcing the department to implement specific reforms within a five-year period. The changes included using more experienced officers on overnight shifts and implementing community policing: assigning officers to monitor specific neighborhoods on a long-term basis and build trust with residents.

“The police chief and many others said after the fact that this was the best thing to ever happen to the Riverside Police Department; it really professionalized the force,” Lockyer said. “I think it makes sense to have some external review, whether federal or state, as a way to check local politics and pressures that can stand in the way of reform.”

The Riverside reform agreement presents one case study to examine stronger state intervention in local policing, but state oversight is not an easy fix. The California attorney general has had intervention authority for 16 years, but has only used it a handful of times. That includes investigations launched in December 2016 by then-state attorney general and current U.S. Senator Kamala Harris. Even police-reform researchers who say these statutes have potential acknowledge they can run into problems when it comes to execution.

Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of the University of California, Irvine, School of Law, said he suspects that political pressures and ambitions deter California attorneys general from exercising their authority more frequently. University of Virginia law professor Rachel Harmon suggested state funding might also present a barrier. “I don’t think mirroring the federal statute, section 14141, is likely to be the most successful state reform effort,” Harmon said, referring to the order granted by Clinton’s 1994 crime bill. “It took the federal government a long time to get that train rolling, and I think it’s very unlikely that the resources or expertise exist in most states to engage in a similarly effective effort.”

Rob Duke's insight:
Riverside was already a well-respected P.D. in California.  For the A/G to take credit for that is politically suspect.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Teen commits suicide after police tried to 'scare him straight'

Teen commits suicide after police tried to 'scare him straight' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The family of a 16-year-old who killed himself after police confronted him about a recorded sexual encounter intend to file a lawsuit.
Rob Duke's insight:
What other reasons might there be for this suicide?  Perhaps the police caused this, but often people who are arrested become concerned about what their families will think, or whether they'll lose their job.  The police don't cause these external effects--right?  So, should the police be responsible?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Arkansas Commission says Jerry Jones’ gift to cops was unethical

Arkansas Commission says Jerry Jones’ gift to cops was unethical | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones says he was just trying to show respect to police officers when he gave game tickets, travel accommodations and Cowboys merchandise to cops in his home town of North Little Rock. But the Arkansas Ethics Commission found that the gifts violated state rules.

According to the Dallas Morning News, Jones was found to have committed an unintentional ethical violation. Jones personally attended the Commission’s hearing to say that he merely made the gifts to send a positive message about work police officers do, specifically volunteer work when they’re not on duty.

An Arkansas blogger who monitors bad government in his state filed the ethics complaint.

Jones will be given a written warning for a first offense of an ethical violation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Sheriff’s Department Statement Regarding the Use of Force Investigation at Union Station on May 17, ... from LASD - Los Angeles County Sheriffs Dept Information Bureau (SIB) : Nixle

Sheriff’s Department Statement Regarding the Use of Force Investigation at Union Station on May 17, 2017

On May 17, 2017, at approximately 11:15 p.m., deputies from the Los Angeles Count
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Smoke shop bust will help sheriff's office buy new helicopter

Smoke shop bust will help sheriff's office buy new helicopter | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Federal government discovered Stuffed Pipe Smoke Shops in Fresno, Visalia, and Bakersfield were involved in the sales and distribution of synthetic cannabinoids, but these drugs, in a variety of packaging, were deadly.

"There have been deaths reported, serious bodily injury, and there are extreme psychological effects from taking the drug," said Karen Escobar, Asst. US Attorney.

The substance known as XLR 1 has also been linked to a large number of suicides. The owner of the Stuffed Pipe stores, Victor Nottoli, pleaded guilty to federal charges, connected to 24 tons of the stuff. He forfeited six and a half million dollars in proceeds.

"We are taking the money out, the profit out of crime, and we are putting it back into the community through law enforcement," said Phil Talbert Us Attorney Eastern Dist. CA.

A big check for nearly $2-million was presented to Sheriff Margaret Mims, by the IRS. Mims said the money will be put to good use.

"With this amount of money being deposited we are well on our way to making sure we have the funding to replace our second helicopter in our air enforcement unit."

In addition, to the money the Sheriff's office got a pickup truck seized from Nottoli. He is scheduled to be sentenced next year, and could face life in prison.
more...
No comment yet.