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Chicago doesn't discipline rogue cops, scholar testifies in bar beating trial - Chicago Tribune

Chicago doesn't discipline rogue cops, scholar testifies in bar beating trial - Chicago Tribune | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Chicago TribuneChicago doesn't discipline rogue cops, scholar testifies in bar beating trialChicago TribuneThe Chicago Police Department doesn't pursue officers accused of excessive force as aggressively as other large departments, an expert...
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biggamevince's comment, December 12, 2012 9:37 PM
After a day of heavy drinking, an officer beat a local bartender after she tried to stop him from coming behind the bar. Initially the officer was charged with only a misdemeanor, so the lawyers on the bartender’s behalf released the video from the bar's security cameras. The violent footage went viral and led to a firestorm of criticism for the department. The officers upgraded the charges to felonies, which later got the officer fired. The Chicago Police Department does not pursue officers accused of excessive force as aggressively as other large departments. Their reports average less than other cities which is an issue. The factors are contributed to a “code of silence” within the department so the corruption does not get reported so it is hard to investigate how much corruption and abuse actually happens until it is on the news like this incident
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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2,000 cases may be overturned because police used secret Stingray surveillance

2,000 cases may be overturned because police used secret Stingray surveillance | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A motion filed Friday says the State’s Attorney’s office colluded with police to withhold ‘discovery’ material obtained via Stingrays from defendants
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Sheriff’s Department hired officers with histories of misconduct

Sheriff’s Department hired officers with histories of misconduct | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Despite background investigations that revealed wrongdoing, incompetence, or poor performance, the department still hired dozens of problem applicants in 2010, internal records show.
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Two Arrested for Spreading Anti-Cop Graffiti in Poplar Bluff, Missouri

Two Arrested for Spreading Anti-Cop Graffiti in Poplar Bluff, Missouri | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Two young women have been apprehended and charged with spray-painting graffiti images of a gun pointing at the head of a police officer.
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FBI Listens in as Suspect in Bizarre 'Gone Girl' Kidnapping Confesses to Reporter

FBI Listens in as Suspect in Bizarre 'Gone Girl' Kidnapping Confesses to Reporter | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Vallejo police announced at the time that the whole thing had to be a hoax staged by Huskins and her boyfriend. But then a second, abortive home invasion occurred in nearby Dublin last June. This time the victims fought off the attacker, and a cell phone abandoned at the scene led law enforcement to Muller, a Harvard Law School graduate and former immigration attorney with a history of mental health issues.

Muller has pleaded not guilty in the Dublin case, and faces federal kidnapping charges for the Vallejo kidnapping. But a new FBI affidavit filed last month—but not reported until now—reveals that Muller came close to being arrested six years ago, in 2009, for two very similar crimes against women in Silicon Valley, in an investigation that prompted him to briefly leave his wife and go into hiding. In the end, no charges were filed.
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Civil Liabilty Drives Police Training: Use of force liability for "Failure to Train" means less training for communication skills

Civil Liabilty Drives Police Training: Use of force liability for "Failure to Train" means less training for communication skills | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A new report had some important findings.

Via Bill Scott
Rob Duke's insight:

This isn't going to change.  As long as administrators are civilly liable for failure to train, they will focus on use of force.  The key is to mandate and fund extra training for communication, restorative justice, crisis intervention, and cultural sensitivity.

 

Time should also be made to allow officers to truly engage in community policing (instead of responding from one call to the next).

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Bill Scott's curator insight, September 4, 5:37 PM

Good, honorable police officers recognize that there are grave problems inside today's law enforcement community, and are worried about the inevitable backlash from fed up citizens. This report is encouraging....

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Officer shot his own patrol car, Mass. police say - CNN.com

Officer shot his own patrol car, Mass. police say - CNN.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An officer fabricated a story about somebody shooting at a police cruiser that crashed and caught fire, said Millis, Massachusetts, police Sgt. William Dwyer.
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Virginia cop Stephen Rankin indicted in teen's death - CNN.com

Virginia cop Stephen Rankin indicted in teen's death - CNN.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A grand jury has indicted Portsmouth, Virginia, police Officer Stephen Rankin on a first-degree murder charge related to the shooting of an unarmed teen in a Walmart parking lot, according to public Virginia court records.
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LAPD urges officers to be community guardians, not warriors on crime

LAPD urges officers to be community guardians, not warriors on crime | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
For years, Los Angeles police officers have worked under the shadow of the department's dark past.
Rob Duke's insight:

The guardian metaphor is much better than warrior; or even sheepdogs.

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Police, firefighter survivors wait years for death benefit

Police, firefighter survivors wait years for death benefit | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
As of August, 750 families are caught waiting for a decision from the federal program despite years of audits calling for speeding up processing of the payments to families of fallen public safety officers.
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Dramatic rise in crime casts a shadow on downtown L.A.'s gentrification

Dramatic rise in crime casts a shadow on downtown L.A.'s gentrification | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
As Lauren Mishkind was walking along 7th Street this summer in downtown Los Angeles, a man pulled a handgun and pointed it at another person standing behind her.
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SHOCK: Off-Duty Cop 'Bound, Gagged, Tortured' in Own Home

SHOCK: Off-Duty Cop 'Bound, Gagged, Tortured' in Own Home | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Texas law enforcement sources tell me that the crime scene of off duty Abilene, Texas Police Officer Don Allen’s murder included anti-cop slurs written in the officer’s own blood.
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Newly released data shows racial disparity in arrests, deaths in California

Newly released data shows racial disparity in arrests, deaths in California | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The California Department of Justice is unveiling a state-run website to provide data on law enforcement's interactions with the public.
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Camera video shows dangers police face during traffic stops

Camera video shows dangers police face during traffic stops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police in Trinity have released two different angles of one traffic stop so the public can see potentially deadly situations from their perspective.
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Man Wrongly Imprisoned In New Haven Murder Case Freed

Man Wrongly Imprisoned In New Haven Murder Case Freed | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
NEW HAVEN — In the same courtroom where a judge in 2007 sentenced him to 38 years in prison for a murder he said he did not commit, Bobby Johnson won his freedom Friday surrounded by the family members and lawyers who always believed he was innocent.
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L.A. County Sheriff's Dept. to get civilian oversight

L.A. County Sheriff's Dept. to get civilian oversight | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Faced with a series of scandals that have roiled the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department , the Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to create a civilian oversight system to provide greater accountability for the agency.
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Man fatally shot by police after attempting to hit officer with metal pipe

FRENCH LICK, Ind. (Sept. 4, 2015)-- A man is dead after an officer-involved shooting in French Lick. Indiana State Police (ISP) and West Baden police responded to a domestic disturbance Friday in F...
Rob Duke's insight:

In the old days, we carried oak batons and lead filled saps, and we were tough enough to fight this guy and win.  But those weapons and the cops who carried them were deemed too violent, so now we train cops to shoot guys with a metal pipe....

 

p.s. that's an editorial, but it's unfair because I wasn't there and this may have been the only way to resolve this and everyone who was innocent to go home with as few injuries as possible....

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Prisoners Pay Millions to Call Loved Ones Every Year. Now this Company Wants Even More | Prison Legal News

Prisoners Pay Millions to Call Loved Ones Every Year. Now this Company Wants Even More | Prison Legal News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Via Doingtime2
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Doingtime2's curator insight, September 4, 6:56 PM

A presentation that the privately-held prison telecom company Securus made to investors that The Huffington Post obtained shows just how much money there is to be made as the state-sanctioned middleman between prisoners and the outside world: $404.6 million last year alone.

Securus, which provides phone services to 2,600 prisons and jails in 47 states, made $114.6 million in profit on that revenue in 2014. Securus’ gross profit margin – a measure of the difference between the cost to provide its services, and what it charges for them – was a whopping 51 percent. And Securus, with a 20 percent market share, isn’t even the biggest prison phone company. That would be Global Tel*Link, or GTL, which has a 50 percent market share, the New York Times reported. GTL drew national attention for its prominent role in the 2014 viral podcast Serial.

While Securus is already making massive profits off of prisoners and their families, they are also looking for other, faster-growing revenue streams. In an April 15, 2015 presentation to investors, the company sought $205 million in debt to fund its purchase of JPay, a telecommunications company that provides banking, electronic communication and entertainment to over a million prisoners in 29 states.

Buying JPay will allow Securus to move beyond the analog world of voice phone calls, and into faster-growing businesses like money transfers, email and video chat, and selling prison-approved tablets that allow prisoners and families to purchase music and games. (Securus announced on April 14 that they had successfully reached an agreement to purchase JPay).

Securus has already seen major earnings growth in recent years. When the current management team took over in 2008, earnings were at $41.7 million. Since then, they’ve grown roughly $10 million each year between 2008 and 2013. Profits soared between 2013 and 2014, jumping from $87 million to $114.6 million in a single year.

Acquiring JPay allows Securus to increase its valuation substantially. Securus was sold to Boston private equity firm ABRY Partners in 2013 for $640 million. The company’s 2014 earnings suggest the company alone is now worth around $950 million. Add in the successful acquisition of JPay, plus the 20 percent annual profit growth they’ve seen in recent years and a good banker to talk the whole thing up, and a valuation of $1.5 billion to $2 billion isn’t outlandish.

Securus and ABRY did not immediately respond to requests for comment. JPay declined to comment.

Like most acquisitions, it is also a boon for jargon: Securus notes that it is excited about the “cross-sell / up-sell opportunities (alongside combination cost-savings)” which will increase Securus’ “growth and broaden its revenue base.” More than most mergers, however, the jargon quickly becomes nauseatingly detached from the human reality of the business both companies are in — forcing prisoners to pay high rates to talk to family and friends, listen to music or play video games.

The acquisition is attractive, Securus says in the presentation, because the approximately $75 billion the U.S. spends annually on the entire corrections industry represents “a large, recession-resistant and stable market.” In the U.S., “inmate population and corrections expenditures,” the company notes, “have grown steadily for 3 decades.” By acquiring JPay, the company will be able to more fully exploit the business opportunity of mass incarceration, Securus leaders pitched: “The acquisition of JPay results in a comprehensive communication and tech-enabled solution provider” that is “well positioned for organic growth.”

As uncomfortable as that sort of business-school jargon may sound in the context of the for-profit prison telecom industry, illustrating what Securus does using stock photos only reinforces the unease. One photo includes a cheerful Securus representative and a bank of computers between a smiling mother and children, and a faceless prisoner.

Debt investors aren’t the only intended audience for this sort of management rhetoric. In an April 14 petition to the New York State Public Service Commission requesting permission to take on the additional debt, Securus said its acquisition of JPay “will serve the public interest” by generating market efficiencies. That petition was approved by default on May 29, 2015.

In another slide, Securus cringingly declares that it “provides a best in class set of business attributes for facilities, inmates, friends/family members, and investors.” Prisoners, family and friends would have a less positive view of the hundreds of millions of dollars a year they are paying to Securus.

This article was originally published by The Huffington Post (www.huffingtonpost.com) on June 10, 2015; it is reprinted with permission of the author. Securus filed a comment with the Federal Communications Commission on June 17, 2015, complaining that “the figures set forth in the article are simply incorrect or taken in the incorrect context.” For example, the profit figures in the investor presentation actually referred to EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization), not net profits. The Human Rights Defense Center, PLN’s parent organization, filed a comment with the FCC on June 24, 2015, noting that not only did “Securus fail to file a copy of the investor presentation referenced as a source in the article ... [it] did not explain why, if the data was inaccurate, it was included in the company’s investor presentation.” Securus announced that it completed its transaction to acquire JPay on July 30, 2015.

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Police: Officer made up story about shooting near high school

Police: Officer made up story about shooting near high school | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A police officer in Los Angeles who claimed he was shot while patrolling near a high school has now been arrested for making up the story, authorities said.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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White House fence jumper killed after pulling knife - CNN.com

White House fence jumper killed after pulling knife  - CNN.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A man who once climbed a wall near the White House was shot and killed at a Pennsylvania courthouse after slashing a deputy sheriff with a knife, a report says.
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Arvin Kangas sentenced in case related to Alaska State Troopers killings

Arvin Kangas sentenced in case related to Alaska State Troopers killings | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS—A Tanana man was sentenced to eight years in jail today for tampering with evidence after the shooting deaths of two Alaska State Troopers last year.
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Seattle police chief faced with tough personnel decision

Seattle police chief faced with tough personnel decision | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
"This is an easy call on Kathleen O'Toole's part because the police chief has already received an investigation that recommends the officer should be let go," said KIRO Radio's Tom Tangney. "It doesn't seem like it's such an outrageous decision on her part, and it would cause great upset in the city if she didn't let her go."

Co-host John Curley agreed.

"You throw her out. You have to throw her out," he said.

"It's the slightest little bit of a liability," Curley said. "If a person even gives any indication, the slightest little bit of an indication — even though she might not be a racist and probably isn't a racist — you just can't have that vulnerability."
Rob Duke's insight:

The Paradox of Proximity: close enough to hear the will of the people, but too close and likely to be caught up in the politics....

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Cumbria Police drones to help crime fighting and searches - BBC News

Cumbria Police drones to help crime fighting and searches - BBC News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Cumbria Constabulary will start using unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, to tackle crime and search for missing people.

Via Marc Van den Broeck
Rob Duke's insight:

Drones are here to stay, but I don't see them accomplishing routine patrol just yet.

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Assault charges for 3 deputies in horse-chase beating

Assault charges for 3 deputies in horse-chase beating | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Three sheriff's deputies involved in the televised beating of a man after he tried to escape on horseback have been charged with felony assault.

Via Bill Scott
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Bill Scott's curator insight, September 2, 10:59 AM

If the KNBC helicopter had NOT been overhead, capturing the entire event on tape, every one of these deputies would have gotten away with brazen assault. When will law enforcement break down its own "Blue Wall of Silence" and aggressively purge rogue/outlaw/savage cops from their ranks?

Jocelyn Stoller's curator insight, September 3, 3:32 AM

add your insight ...

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Police-citizen tensions worsening across the country

Police-citizen tensions worsening across the country | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Hostility towards law enforcement seems to be in evidence, from chants in the street to attacks on officers.
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Opinion: Attacks on police an attack on community - CNN.com

Opinion: Attacks on police an attack on community - CNN.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
We must be seamlessly united in our agreement that lawlessness is not an option.
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