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Oakland police still handling fallout over treatment of Occupy movement - Chicago Tribune

Oakland police still handling fallout over treatment of Occupy movement - Chicago Tribune | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
CBS LocalOakland police still handling fallout over treatment of Occupy movementChicago Tribune(Reuters) - One year after anti-Wall Street protests began rocking the streets of Oakland, police said on Friday they had fired or suspended 17 officers...
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Complaints against police drop to lowest level since 1990

Complaints against police drop to lowest level since 1990 | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Analysts and officials credit several factors, including better training, a lower crime rate, heightened sensitivity by officers and seemingly ever-present cameras to record police contact with people. Christopher Slobogin, a psychiatry professor and director of Vanderbilt Law School's Criminal Justice Program, said police agencies and officers can't help but be aware of recent incidents making national headlines and are adjusting their behavior and policies. [...] there's no doubt that camera
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Baltimore mayor orders review of police riot gear following city unrest

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is issuing two directives to help city police officers be more prepared for situations like the April riots.
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Interesting....

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Broken windows policing needs to go. We need a community-oriented approach | John Eterno and Eli Silverman

Broken windows policing needs to go. We need a community-oriented approach | John Eterno and Eli Silverman | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Officers need to develop close ties to the communities they serve rather than alienate them. They should not browbeat citizens but work with them
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Cops livid over proposed 'police reform' measures

Rank-and-file cops are fuming over several “police reform” measures City Council members plan to review this week, including bills that would force cops to get suspects’ consent for searches, impri...
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How Anthony Graves Went from Death Row to Overseeing the Houston Crime Lab

How Anthony Graves Went from Death Row to Overseeing the Houston Crime Lab | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Anthony Graves, who spent more than 18 years in prison for a murder he did not commit, has since become a fierce advocate for prison reform.
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Vincent Zamora's comment, June 28, 10:22 PM
I think this is a great opportunity for justice itself because a person like this who truly understands the importance of right and wrongful convictions can make a huge difference in justice because they would look at all cases as peoples and not just files. Taking even a day away from an innocent man or woman is a great injustice and is one of many reasons people do not trust the system but with someone who has been wrongly accused and can make a difference and can put his passion for proving innocence or guilt behind this.
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Sheriff: Ramsey Co. Deputy Caught On Camera Abusing K-9

A Ramsey County Sheriff's deputy faces criminal charges after he was caught on surveillance cameras abusing his K-9 partner at a Carlton casino. The Carlton County Sheriff's Office says 48-year-old Brett Arthur Berry was at Black Bear Casino on June 14 and 15 for a canine training and certification event.
Rob Duke's insight:

Many k-9 behavioral problems can be traced to something the handler is doing wrong.  You might make a dog submit if he tried to bite a handler (a sign of rank drive), but this looks like the deputy just lost his cool.  It's never fun to have a dog act up and embarrass you in front of colleagues, but it's a mistake not to praise the dog and build them up with kindness.  Corrections are given, but always immediately cheerful and up-beat when the dog is successful.

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Vincent Zamora's comment, June 28, 10:41 PM
This is just sick. This is the exact type of thing that makes the public afraid of the people who are supposed to be protecting us. If a so called officer while abuse his fellow officer regardless if it is an animal, then he could care less about his fellow man. This was a power trip and was getting a type of high off the power he felt from
Vincent Zamora's comment, June 28, 10:48 PM
abusing someone who can not defend themselves. If a cop could do this to someone he is supposed to work along side with just imagine what he would have done to the people he was supposed to protect and serve if he had not already. this truly churns my stomach and sadly reassures my feelings towards most police officers. Just imagine what he had trained those dogs to do to people just because he could. I will be paying close attention this case and see how it ends.
max mckernan's comment, June 29, 3:56 AM
I would be very surprised if this officer is not brought up on criminal charges for assaulting a fellow officer. much like any person you treat the K9 who is your partner with respect no ifs ands or buts
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Assessment: What’s Your Leadership Style?

Assessment: What’s Your Leadership Style? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Get feedback on your strengths, weaknesses, and blind spots.
Rob Duke's insight:

Interesting quiz....

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JonHochendoner's comment, June 29, 12:55 AM
Most of my leadership roles were in sports earlier in life. I got the composer and found many of its qualities and downfalls to be true, particularly in recent work situations.
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Maryland legislators considering law to further restrict when police can use deadly force

Maryland legislators considering law to further restrict when police can use deadly force | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Still, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has responded to concerns about a police slowdown by saying officers need to earn their paychecks.

Amnesty International said Thursday that a lack of laws on use of deadly force by officers is limiting police accountability nationwide.

Maryland, the human rights group found, is one of nine states with no law on the police use of deadly force. The state defers to federal law and the guidelines set by individual police departments.
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JonHochendoner's comment, June 22, 12:31 AM
I think umbrella laws can have negative consequences. All towns and cities have different circumstances and variables. The verbage of this bill will be important. How will force be limited? What actions can justify it? Will these cases be subject to internal review as they are now? I do agree with some of Vince's thoughts.
Jessica Leigh's comment, June 22, 4:54 PM
Many of these cases where the alleged offender is beaten or fatally shot and there are minimal to no witnesses it becomes he says versus she says. It seems that most cases lean toward the side of the officer, but why do we never give the benefit of the doubt to the witness? Some officers are given too much credibility and innocent bystanders are not given enough. In regards to laws on police brutality and use of lethal force, they should be federal laws. There should be a united front on this issue in all 50 states.
DERRICK NELSON's comment, June 28, 3:16 AM
Police brutality walks a thin line between reasonable force and unnecessary force. Deadly force falls in both categories. I think Maryland legislators are on the right track with the development of the public safety commission. Investigations need to be conducted to unify police deadly force laws around the state. This will simplify things, and hopefully reach a consensus for officers to still defend themselves and perform their duties.
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NYPD sergeant acquitted of drunken driving charge

“If he wasn't a cop, I would have said that he was not above the legal limit,” Nielson, of NYPD Highway District No. 2, told the prosecutor, according to court papers.

A law enforcement source said that Nielson was apparently trying to articulate that Stewart's inebriation was a close call, and he didn't want to appear to be showing favoritism.

Stewart was arrested on April 18, 2014, after he allegedly struck a parked car in Brooklyn. Nielson videotaped him refusing to take a Breathalyzer and passing the physical coordination test.

“He (Nielson) tanked the case,” the source said.

Nielson's unusual statement was not disclosed to defense lawyer Eric Sanders until after the sergeant had pleaded guilty to the DWI charge last March. Sanders successfully argued that his client should be allowed to withdraw the plea in light of the new evidence.

“I have argued from the outset that the client is guilty of nothing more than being a police officer,” Sanders told the Daily News.
Rob Duke's insight:

Yeah, in my experience, this is the new normal.  We don't give breaks to fellow cops.  It's a good way to stop your career in its tracks.

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Montana Lee Nolan's comment, June 22, 12:48 AM
Cops shouldn’t be given breaks. It is a part of their job to represent proper behavior, and if an average citizen could get a dui under the same exact circumstances then so should a cop. If not, then that reflects badly on all cops in general fueling more to the idea that they can get away with anything they want. At the same time, the highway patrol man saying that he didn’t want to show favoritism shows that even law enforcement agents are concerned with how they are viewed by the public. The patrol officer was afraid that he would be criticized for not giving him a dui, but also stated that if he wasn’t a cop we wouldn’t have done it in the first place. This is a great example of how difficult it is for officers to deal with other officers who have made a mistake that many average Americans make, while trying to maintain an image that no one is exempt from the law.
Montana Lee Nolan's curator insight, June 22, 12:48 AM

Cops shouldn’t be given breaks.  It is a part of their job to represent proper behavior, and if an average citizen could get a dui under the same exact circumstances then so should a cop.  If not, then that reflects badly on all cops in general fueling more to the idea that they can get away with anything they want.  At the same time, the highway patrol man saying that he didn’t want to show favoritism shows that even law enforcement agents are concerned with how they are viewed by the public.  The patrol officer was afraid that he would be criticized for not giving him a dui, but also stated that if he wasn’t a cop we wouldn’t have done it in the first place.  This is a great example of how difficult it is for officers to deal with other officers who have made a mistake that many average Americans make, while trying to maintain an image that no one is exempt from the law.

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Hands off Hamilton -- the most modern Founding Father

Hands off Hamilton -- the most modern Founding Father | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Forget our pride in The Post’s founder: Treasury Secretary Jack Lew’s slap at Alexander Hamilton is just plain wrong. Plans to put a woman on some US currency have been floating for weeks; word was...
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Hollywood to Turn Historic Norco Bank Heist Into A Movie | Life in Corona

Hollywood to Turn Historic Norco Bank Heist Into A Movie | Life in Corona | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Mark Romanek is in final negotiations to direct Norco, a thriller based the true story of the 1980 Norco bank robbery that would change policing.
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The Role of Prosecutors as Social Justice Advocates

The Role of Prosecutors as Social Justice Advocates | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
How can prosecutors affect social justice change in the justice system?…
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Video: Santa Ana police raid pot shop, then eat its edibles, attorney says

Video: Santa Ana police raid pot shop, then eat its edibles, attorney says | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A video that appears to show a Santa Ana police officer eating a pot-laced edible after raiding a pot shop has prompted a police investigation.
Rob Duke's insight:

Rockstar lifestyle, above the law, warrior culture, and showing off....yikes...

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Vincent Zamora's comment, June 21, 4:32 AM
This video and type of behavior by police makes me sick to my stomach and is exactly why people like myself have such a huge amount of disrespect for cops and disregard for their so called services. i literally get sick to my stomach and start to sweat. These cops knew what they were doing and its obvious they have done this before. It's clear they had no good intentions with this "raid" as they thought they had dismounted and turned off all the video cameras. They stole, they bullied, and they consumed food knowing it was laced with marijuana. The only thing that is confusing about this story is that they are calling it an investigation. The worst that I fear will happen in this case is that they will just loose their jobs with no jail time. What they did was wrong morally and ILLEGAL. It doesn
Vincent Zamora's comment, June 21, 4:35 AM
matter that this video was edited by the lawyer what the police were doing is are things they shouldn't have been doing in the first place. the only reason it was edited was due to time. This is a poor display of police work and doesn't give any encouragement to those that already do not have much confidence for them in the first place.
Yarima Lopez Rodriguez's comment, June 23, 3:43 AM
The Santa Ana police department says an internal investigation dishonest or fraudulent conduct by those in power. Police corruption is a form of police misconduct in which law enforcement officers break their social contract and abuse their power for personal or department gain. This is our new police force across the nation. This is exactly what they have become. Police break the very laws they are supposed to up hold. Whenever you have a segment of the population, ie; police, who hold themselves as above the law, they will always abuse the rights of the ones they consider below them.
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Why Police Agencies Still Can't Communicate In A Crisis

The solution is twofold: establishing a broadband frequency that those agencies can access, and making sure everyone at those agencies has the equipment to use it. That's not a small or cheap task. The 2012 CRS report puts the estimated cost of the broadband setup "in the tens of billions of dollars," while radios could cost between $500 and $6,000 for each responder at every one of those 65,000 agencies.
Rob Duke's insight:

The problem is getting all that to work across all 50 states with varying terrain.  The typical state trooper agencies operate on the low VHF bands (30-300khz) because the signals can bend over long distances (think the old CB radio bands with the long whip antennas), but urban departments with the need for lots of frequencies have switched to high UHF bands (450-950mhz); or even the 800mhz ranges.  This has been exacerbated by the Feds selling off frequencies for mobile communications, which pushed many many local agencies to 800mhz with promised "better" communication only to discover that 800mhz doesn't bend worth a damn and often can't penetrate even a simple steel frame building.  Oh, BTW, a radio band that operates on 800mhz can't operate on UHF or VHF.

Getting the system contemplated by FirstNet is not going to be easy....

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Connecticut Legislature Approves Sweeping Police Accountability Bill

Connecticut Legislature Approves Sweeping Police Accountability Bill | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
It also mandates state police to equip troopers with body cameras. While municipal departments would not be required to use the technology, the legislation provides a financial incentive for those that do. 

And the legislation stipulates that cases involving police use of deadly force would be assigned to investigators from outside of the officer’s jurisdiction, in an effort to avoid a potential conflict of interest.
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L.A. County D.A. Jackie Lacey to unveil details on wrongful-conviction unit

L.A. County D.A. Jackie Lacey to unveil details on wrongful-conviction unit | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey will unveil details Monday about the creation of a unit dedicated to reviewing the integrity of convictions for people behind bars for serious or violent crimes.
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After Detroit tragedy, is it time to put the brakes on police chases?

Michigan is one of the deadliest states when it comes to the number of people killed in police pursuits, national statistics show.
Rob Duke's insight:

Some courts think that there's a push phenomena where officers propels suspects in chases; other courts think it is like officers are towed behind.

This seems to be significant.  If officer's push, then they probably share some blame for these tragedies--what are your thoughts?

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Vincent Zamora's comment, June 28, 10:05 PM
Ofcorse the officer should know when to hold back during a police chase especially when there are civilians let alone children. If you are obviously chasing a murderer or a national fugitive it is of the upmost importance to catch him or her but why risk everything to catch a killer if you're only going to kill more innocent people. This one is an up in the air kind of a question and I truly have no answer because if this were to go through, then it would make it that much harder for the law and that much easier for the criminals to get away. I leave this one a stale mate.
JonHochendoner's comment, June 29, 12:47 AM
The only way to find out is to stop chasing suspects for a time and see how they react and compare those stats to previous instances. Laws can be changed to accommodate . Other means could be employed to substitute such as helicopters or now, drones. I agree with Vincent in that it's difficult to determine the outcomes.
max mckernan's comment, June 29, 4:51 AM
i think that officers know when they should hold back however the issue is that every individual is different and they have different ideas on what their limits are. I mean law abiding citizens generally are not the ones running.
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‘You’re Really Being an Asshole, Officer' | VICE | United States

A look back at some historical court cases involving people cursing at cops.
Rob Duke's insight:

Washington isn't representative of the nation, so it's always better to comply with lawful commands.

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DERRICK NELSON's comment, June 28, 2:11 AM
Officers seem to think when people use their freedom of speech rights to degrade them it's an approval of arrest. Because of the police authoritative privilege they think no one outside of their uniform is capable of mouthing them off without legal consequences. Officers have lost sight of constitutional protection concerning freedom of speech to instill punishment to those who hurt their feelings.
JonHochendoner's comment, June 29, 12:50 AM
I agree with Derrick. Officers become the badge and think that any dissent is directed at THEM, personally, and not at the position. I think free speech wins every time but it's important to remember that you're dealing with people and you might catch some trumped up charges.
max mckernan's comment, June 30, 4:15 AM
This man was clearly exercising his rights and however if he really wanted to keep an eye on his sister than he should have done it in a bit of a less vulgar way. i agree with duke it is always better to comply with lawful commands
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Hartford activists participate in police simulator

Hartford activists participate in police simulator | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A well-respected community activist agreed to step into the shoes of a Hartford police officer and participate in on-the-job training involving use of force.
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JonHochendoner's comment, June 29, 12:57 AM
This is a positive use of technology and could help to bridge the gap between police and critics. If officers are wearing bodycams, real life situations could be replicated. I would enjoy doing this simulator myself.
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Hutto Police Sgt. Chris Kelley dies after being run over by car

Hutto Police Sgt. Chris Kelley dies after being run over by car | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Colby Ray Williamson has been charged in connection with Sgt. Chris Kelley's death.
Rob Duke's insight:

Policies prohibiting firing at vehicles in some jurisdictions, but this is a reality for police officers--suspects us their vehicles as weapons.

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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, June 25, 5:59 PM

LORD GOD BE WITH, HAVE MERCY ONANDPROVIDEALL THAT IS NEEDED FOR HIS FAMILY , FREINDS AND LOVE ONES AND AS YOU KNOW ALL ABOUT WHAT HAS TAKEN PLACE LET YOUR JUSTICE BE DONE GOD STYLEAND WE THANK YOU IN ADVANCE FOR YOUR GRACE AND MERCY INTERCEDING  WITH YOUR PERFECT PEACE  STANDING IN THE GAP WITH YOUR LOVE  JOY WISDOM KNOWLEDGE AND GUIDANCE AS ONLY YOU KNOW HOW AND CAN IN JESUS PRECIOUS NAME WE PRAY THANK YOU LORD GOD ALL MIGHTY FOR EVERYTHING YOU HAVE DONE GONNA DO AND OR YET AND STILL DOING AND WE THANK YOU FOR IT ALL .

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Ex-Rikers Captain Is Sentenced to 5 Years in Inmate’s Death

Ex-Rikers Captain Is Sentenced to 5 Years in Inmate’s Death | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The captain, Terrence Pendergrass, had been convicted of violating the civil rights of the inmate, Jason Echevarria, for refusing to seek help for Mr. Echevarria after he swallowed a soap ball.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Vincent Zamora's comment, June 21, 5:08 AM
Why should he receive any leniency and shorter sentence. A man died and will no longer see, hear, or speak to his family because he refused such a simple thing like medical attention. Something as simple as antibiotics could have made the difference. The officer said himself, "don's speak to me unless someone is dead". He obviously did not care about the situation or the inmates well being. Why shouldn't he receive the full sentence. He was given professional opinion from the doctors at Rikers that the inmate needed immediate medical attention and he denied it. He made a decision that killed a man and he should suffer the penalty in full which he knew in before hand. He just did not think that he was going to get in trouble and no one would care because it was an inmate. anything less than 10 years is a joke.
Jessica Leigh's comment, June 22, 3:28 PM
Cases like these are why most people don't have faith in the Justice system. To me it sounds like he was only charged with deliberate indifference. What about manslaughter? He neglected his duties as caretaker of the inmate and resulted in his death. He even said the words "don't bother me unless someone is dead." He ignored the pleas of his coworkers and a man lost his life because of it. Why is there leniency? How is the maximum sentence of ten years unjustified? The victim's father stated that he hopes he has a hard time in jail. A corrections officer on the other side of the bars? I think he will most definitely have a hard time in jail.
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Amnesty: U.S. doesn't meet international standards for deadly police force

A 41-page report released by Amnesty International on Thursday found that states lack statutes that require officers to use deadly force only as a last resort to protect officers or others against imminent threat of death or serious injury.

The report also found that 13 states have laws that don't comply with U.S. constitutional standards and that all states lack specific accountability mechanisms for officer-involved killings, including obligatory reporting that a firearm has been used and prompt, impartial investigations into killings.

"Police have a fundamental obligation to protect human life," said Steven Hawkins, executive director of Amnesty International USA. "Deadly force must be reserved as a method of absolute last resort. The fact that absolutely no state laws conform to this standard is deeply disturbing and raises serious human rights concerns."
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Montana Lee Nolan's curator insight, June 22, 12:49 AM

With police brutality playing a major role in recent media spotlight, it’s not surprising that Amnesty International did an investigative report.  With it being released however, it’s basically he said vs. she said.  In my opinion, Amnesty overstepped in essentially saying that the whole country isn’t up to standards on when to use lethal force and when to not.  I feel like that’s clearly not true, and while this is definitely a huge problem that needs to be addressed immediately, it is also important to note that the majority of departments out there do teach that lethal should only be used as the absolute last resort in a crisis.  However, I do think that it would be beneficial to actually write these words down as an official guideline (if not already).  With public opinion being influenced by media and one-sided reports (arguably one-sided; I actually believe that there is some truth in Amnesty’s report even though it seems to me that it’s a bit biased (at least from what I can gather from this article)), it would probably be in the best interest of departments to just watch their backs.  Why not make an official “lethal as last resort” clause? It would probably make a whole lot of people happy in the end.

Jessica Leigh's comment, June 22, 4:02 PM
I think that this article is slightly biased and sort of beats around the bush telling people what they think they already know. The general public is already convinced that police don't abide by the rule that lethal force should be used as a last resort. The article says that there are only 13 out of our 50 states that don't have the lethal use law, but they do not say whether or not each individual police department has that policy. The article makes it sound like it is the general policy of every department. Because this isn't an official law it sends people into an uproar. It would be greatly beneficial to these states to create these laws to calm the public down a bit. However, the absence of these laws do impede on human rights discussed in a report on Michael Brown. I think that this article could go both ways. It supports different sides, but in the long run decisions should be made to concrete human rights to ensure victims/offenders/police are all legally protected.
Yarima Lopez Rodriguez's comment, June 23, 3:33 AM
What really needs to change is the police mentality of constant paranoia. The American police force today assumes every person they meet is a homicidal maniac with a gun (regardless of age, though they certainly have a soft spot for white people). Thus, almost every confrontation ends with brutality and in many cases, murder. Only by changing the police manual and the way the police perceive common citizens this overwhelmingly gloomy situation be fixed.
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Beck: Police need more leeway to explain disciplinary decisions

Beck: Police need more leeway to explain disciplinary decisions | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police departments should have "greater leeway" for disclosing the disciplinary measures meted out against officers, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck said Wednesday.

The chief was responding to questions related to the confidentiality rules that have left the public in the dark about what discipline will be meted out to the officers involved in the fatal shooting of Ezell Ford, the unarmed black man whose story has echoed many others in recent years amid a growing movement nationwide to highlight and combat excessive use of force by police.

"I did not create the confidentiality laws that I'm bound by," Beck said. "I think that there should be greater leeway for the police department to make not only the decisions known, but the rationale behind the decision."
Rob Duke's insight:

For the most part, I agree with Beck.  The chief needs to be able to report that he/she has acted responsibly.

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JonHochendoner's comment, June 22, 12:39 AM
These laws were designed to hide the disparity in justice between those in the law and those outside of it. Those opposed to greater transparency are fearful of these differences coming to light. I agree with Beck.
Montana Lee Nolan's comment, June 22, 1:06 AM
I agree with him for the most part as well. At times like this I think it’s important for the public to know the reasons for certain decisions. Providing that reason might help shed light on the situation, as well as ease the controversy. To be required to remain silent about the situation doesn’t seem like the best decision, especially when tensions are so high.
Montana Lee Nolan's curator insight, June 22, 1:07 AM

I agree with him for the most part as well.  At times like this I think it’s important for the public to know the reasons for certain decisions.  Providing that reason might help shed light on the situation, as well as ease the controversy.   To be required to remain silent about the situation doesn’t seem like the best decision, especially when tensions are so high. 

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NBA players want NYPD cops' records in 'highly unusual case'

They want to check for flagrant fouls. Lawyers for two Atlanta Hawks basketball players busted for allegedly interfering with an investigation into the stabbing of ex-Knicks forward Chris Copelan...
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Britain’s Magna Carta turns 800 today, Queen Elizabeth, other royals to attend

The Magna Carta or "The Great Charter" issued in the name of 13th century British monarch King John, turns 800 today, and the anniversary event will be observed with an extravagant ceremony in Runnymede, the meadow near Windsor where the king capitulated to the demands of a handful of his barons to affix his royal seal to the original document that guaranteed individuals certain freedoms and rights.
Rob Duke's insight:

The idea that started it all....limits on government and despotic power began here in 1215.

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