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Police force tweets England football commentary - Telegraph

Police force tweets England football commentary - Telegraph | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A regional English police force has been hailed as a 'Twitter sensation' after a member of staff gave a live commentary on the Euro 2012 football match, despite one disgruntled viewer telling them to "go catch some crims".
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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The FBI Is very excited about this machine that can scan your DNA in 90 minutes

The FBI Is very excited about this machine that can scan your DNA in 90 minutes | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Rapid-DNA technology makes it easier than ever to grab and store your genetic profile. G-men, cops, and Homeland Security can't wait to see it everywhere.
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It’s hard to keep caring - American Police Beat Magazine

It’s hard to keep caring - American Police Beat Magazine | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
By Lt Daniel Furseth Today, I stopped caring about my fellow man. I stopped caring about my community, my neighbors, and those I serve. I stopped caring today because a once noble profession has become despised, hated, distrusted, and mostly unwanted. I stopped caring today because parents refuse to teach their kids right from wrong...
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Is this a realistic viewpoint?  Is it the world that is messed up and the police profession that's o.k.?  I'm interested in your thoughts on this....

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Police in Thailand Lay Down Weapons and Join with Protestors

Police in Thailand Lay Down Weapons and Join with Protestors | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In a stunning turn of events, Thailand police laid down their barricades and vests to join in solidarity with protestors.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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What Leaders Really Do

They don’t make plans; they don’t solve problems; they don’t even organize people. What leaders really do is prepare organizations for change and help them cope as they struggle through it.
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Prepare your organization for change.  The only constant is that things change....

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San Jose police chief got free 49ers tickets

San Jose police chief got free 49ers tickets | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
San Jose Police Chief Larry Esquivel, who last month barred his officers from moonlighting as private security guards for the 49ers, is now under investigation for accepting free tickets from the team, officials said Thursday. LaDoris Cordell, San Jose’s independent police auditor, confirmed Thursday that her office had received complaints about Esquivel; Assistant Chief Eddie Garcia, who is second in command; and Deputy Chief Jeff Marozick, who oversees the bureau of technical services. The
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Duped by Medill Innocence Project, Milwaukee man now free

Duped by Medill Innocence Project, Milwaukee man now free | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Alstory Simon — fooled into a confession that pushed Illinois to end the death penalty — is now free after 15 years behind bars.
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Rodney Ebersole's comment, November 14, 7:47 PM
Amazing that in the name of finding justice and not sending the wrong people to jail, that other people are forced into jail for crimes they didn't commit. Simon sounds like a lost soul who was at the wrong place at the wrong time. He was an easy target given the fact he was high and he was in the vicinity of the crime. I can't imagine losing 15 years of my life over being played by the people involved in this case. Why any of the original people involved in this case are not in jail themselves for the lies they told are troubling to me. How many other people were coerced into testifying for a crime they didn't commit?
Rob Duke's comment, November 14, 11:56 PM
Yes, it's surprising that we're not hearing more about this...
Maria Hejl's comment, Today, 2:38 AM
This reminds me of a case we watched a video on in my Juvenile Justice class I took at USC. There were young minority teen boys who were in the wrong place at the wrong time, and were picked up by the police and then coerced into confessing to crimes they did not commit. They were held in questioning for days without food, sleep or to see family. It sad to see that police officers are misusing their power to convict whoever they see fit rather than finding the real criminals. I agree with Rodney that those who were responsible for they lies they told should be in jail and it is very unsettling that they are not having to somehow make up the time lost by the man they wrongfully imprisoned.
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Marijuana milestone

Marijuana milestone | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
BESIDES choosing lawmakers, on November 4th voters in three American states and the District of Columbia considered measures to liberalise the cannabis trade. Alaska...
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Rashaad's curator insight, November 12, 10:37 PM

Not coming from a bias standpoint at all but I do not see the problem that marijuana can have, that would stand as something that is worst than alcohol. Therefore I do not see the problem with legalizing marijuana. There are much more things going on in the world that is way more important to focus on. Along side of that, do to the fact that marijuana is so popular in the world today, it is not a drug that is hard to come across and partake in using regardless if it were legal or not. In other cases I do although I do feel as if there are people that would benefit from legalization based on their medical history and the fact that it is a drug that can be beneficial in curing what even the medical problem is with a certain individual. Referring to my person experience and upbringing, there have been plenty of times when I was in high school in which that marijuana was presented to me. I personally do not smoke, but I do have friends that are heavy smokers and it was no problem for them to get their hands on marijuana at any moment. I say this because like I stated above whether it is legal or not, it is going to be used by those who have a habit or just feel like partaking in smoking weed. 

Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 15, 3:19 AM
Its interesting to follow the changing laws state to state. Until the Federal government changes the classification of Marijuana it still wont change too much. I have already received the “notifications” and reminders stating federal law trumps state law and for those involved with the federal government it is still against the law to have anything to do with Marijuana. Opinions have changed, but than again you have a city in MA who is trying to make smoking anything in general banned. There are still companies who are against the legalization because they don't want it to affect their company. Fear of industrial Hemp,Hemp would be an ideal source of biomass for fuel, and hemp Ethanol burns very cleanly. Also pharmaceutical companies would rather have you take a pain pill which you become addicted to, than use medical marijuana for cancer pain treatment. I wonder what big changes will be in the next five years time.
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Community Post: “IF IN DOUBT…TAKE IT!” Behind Closed Doors, Government Officials Make Shocking Comments About Civil Forfeiture

Community Post: “IF IN DOUBT…TAKE IT!” Behind Closed Doors, Government Officials Make Shocking Comments About Civil Forfeiture | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
There are three kinds of people in this world: Those who're outraged by civil forfeiture, those who don't know what it is and those who profit from it.
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Maria Hejl's comment, Today, 2:44 AM
I really dislike the civil forfeiture law. To know that at any given day for any given reason an officer could pull me over and take anything I have based on the fact that a drug dog might have mistakenly signaled that they smelled something and after a vehicle search they find absolutely nothing but can take my car or anything in it because they feel it was necessary. They can also profit from the civil forfeiture which makes it even that more disturbing. This should not be legal.
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Ferguson police’s other sin: Why grand jury must probe Brown shooting’s aftermath

Ferguson police’s other sin: Why grand jury must probe Brown shooting’s aftermath | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
As we wait to hear the grand jury's decision, one part of the horrific episode is getting way too little attention
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The Marlboro of marijuana

The Marlboro of marijuana | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“FRESH and fruity, right?” says a bright-eyed young man behind the counter, wafting an open jar of something called “AK-47” under Schumpeter’s nose....
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Ricky Osborne's comment, November 8, 10:47 PM
I see there being a lot of benefits with the legalization of marijuana. This new legal drug will take the money out of the criminal’s hands and put it in those law abiding citizens. These drugs can be regulated and be maintained at a higher level than possible when such was deemed illegal. The influx of income the state will receive from the sale of legal marijuana will be another positive aspect. This money can go towards much needed projects around the state. The criminal justice system will also be less burdened as less arrests will be made. All in all the legalization of marijuana will affect the state of Alaska in a positive manner.
Brittney Ward's comment, November 13, 2:18 PM
Legalization of marijuana will contribute to increased state funds through taxation. I think at this point legalization was really inevitable, it was going to happen eventually. With the right legislation and regulation I can see this being a positive thing. Police will be able to focus on other areas of crime and money will go back into the state.
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Minneapolis police start using body cameras Friday

Minneapolis police start using body cameras Friday | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The body camera pilot program will last six to nine months and includes 36 officers from precincts across the city.
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Brittany Stahle's comment, November 12, 1:09 AM
I really like this idea and it will benefit police officers that are being falsely accused. It will also I think help the department see what officers are flowing the protocol and help the public from police misconduct. I can see this spreading all over the US once departments see how beneficial it is!
Brandon Jensen's comment, November 12, 7:48 PM
overall, I believe that police officers wearing body cameras is a good thing. Of course to everything there is pros and cons, but body cameras will not only help protect police officers but also citizens. It will be interesting to see what changes for these officers in the future.
Brittney Ward's comment, November 13, 1:29 PM
I think this brings forth a new level of accountability for police. Body cameras will serve a dual purpose in protecting police officers from false accusations regarding their conduct and will also protect the public from possible misuse of force. I can definitely see this trend spreading across the nation, time will tell how affective they are.
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The One Thing About Your Spouse’s Personality That Really Affects Your Career

The One Thing About Your Spouse’s Personality That Really Affects Your Career | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Researchers find it predicts income, promotions, and job satisfaction.
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Making Dumb Groups Smarter

Making Dumb Groups Smarter | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Since the beginning of human history, people have made decisions in groups. As the saying goes, two heads are better than one. If so, then three heads should be better than two, and four better still. With a hundred or a thousand, then, things are bound to go well—hence the supposed wisdom of crowds. The […]
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CHP nude photo scandal: When can police search your phone?

CHP nude photo scandal: When can police search your phone? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The answers can be murky as interpretations of the Constitution catch up to technology. A recent Supreme Court decision requiring law enforcement agencies to get a warrant to search a suspect's smartphone still leaves gray areas and the recent Dublin CHP nude photo scandal raises concerns.
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How the Prison-Industrial Complex Kills People For Profit • BRAVE NEW FILMS: JUSTICE


Failing to provide sick prisoners with needed care turns out to be pretty good for Corizon's profits. WATCH MORE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6vuY... SUBSCRIBE:http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

While Corizon's new CEO Woodrow A. Myers claims that his company "save[s] lives instead of tak[ing] them," sick inmates continue to die due to their neglect and refusal to render even the most basic of medical services. This is the the "Get-Rich-Quick" plan that's actually killing people.

This video is part of the Prison Profiteers series produced by Brave New Foundation's Beyond Bars campaign in partnership with the ACLU and The Nation. Narration by Henry Rollins. Research help provided by Prison Legal News.

http://aclu.org/corizon #prisonprofiteers


Via Darcy Delaproser
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LAPD survey finds bias complaints

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A survey of 500 Los Angeles Police Department employees found widespread concerns among officers and civilians that the department's internal discipline system is deeply flawed and discriminates based on gender, ethnicity and rank, according to a report.
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Will suicide spur action on police officers with PTSD?

Will suicide spur action on police officers with PTSD? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
EJ Montini: As the head of the police officers union says, if we accept PTSD with soldiers, why not with officers?
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Clay Faris's comment, November 17, 7:07 AM
This makes sense. To be honest I'd not realized that we had a problem recognizing PTSD amongst officers. Any violent encounter can lead, ostensibly, to PTSD. Though I'm reluctant to term every bad reaction or choice to PTSD, certainly we can directly link things like this. If it's not being recognized it ought to be.
Maria Hejl's comment, Today, 2:28 AM
I agree. Some experiences that officers endure would warrant psychological treatment for PTSD just as Soldiers who serve in a combat zone do. Just as the military is working on getting rid of the stigma that comes with seeking help for PTSD. However I don't think it should be misused as their way out of bad policing.
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Anchorage legislator wants to clarify marijuana rules come January

Anchorage legislator wants to clarify marijuana rules come January | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Anchorage Rep. Bob Lynn said he plans to introduce legislation clarifying restrictions on marijuana sales in Alaska, hoping to start a discussion on how to regulate the substance.
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Brittney Ward's comment, November 13, 1:46 PM
This article raises some good points about what is expected to come with legalization of marijuana and I agree that legislation to regulate, the main idea behind legalizing marijuana needs to be in place. The idea Lynn has on developing a board similar to the ABC (alcohol beverage control) board for marijuana is a great idea in my opinion. There needs to be structure in place in regard to legislation and even in policing the use now that it is legal.
Clay Faris's comment, November 17, 7:00 AM
Brittney, I agree that some regulation is needed, however my concern is that the legislators, amidst pressure from various outside groups and interests, will use the "regulation" as another and ongoing method to keep marijuana illegal and basically ignore the voice of the people of the state. Some structure is already in place (i.e. - the alcohol regulatory board & DUI laws), while some additional structure is necessary, not as much as they're making it sound like.
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Police Use Department Wish List When Deciding Which Assets to Seize

Police Use Department Wish List When Deciding Which Assets to Seize | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police officers and prosecutors give tips on civil asset forfeiture, the practice allowing the government, without ever filing a criminal charge, to seize property believed to have ties to crime, in seminars across the country.
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Rodney Ebersole's comment, November 14, 8:26 PM
I have no problem with seizing a vehicle from a DUI incident as I have very little compassion for people who choose to drink and drive. However after reading this article I have to wonder if there is more bad than good being done with civil asset forfeiture and if affluent people are being targeted. There needs to be regulations in place so houses are not forfeited unless very serious crimes are committed in them and cars and household materials are not forfeited for small crimes. It sounds like there is very little rules in what a police officer can take in a civil asset forfeiture, without strict rules in place I see an area of easy corruption.
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Four wrongfully convicted men, four very different outcomes | PBS NewsHour

Four wrongfully convicted men, four very different outcomes | PBS NewsHour | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
When a wrongfully convicted person gets released from prison, it is a major news event: Local television crews capture the first steps of freedom and the speeches on the steps of the state capital, audiences empathize as they grapple with gratitude and rage, and the exonerees take their first steps into an uncertain future. Continue reading →
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Rachael Toy's comment, November 13, 3:42 AM
Oh how I hate this topic. I feel so sad for these men. I couldn’t even begin to fathom what is must feel like to know you are telling the truth, to know you didn’t do it, and then to spend years and years in a horrible place for nothing. It can completely steal your life. The one guy really caught me off guard when he said he was 16 when convicted and didn’t even have a driver’s license now at like 33 years old, which is such an intense image. The technology change, having no money, job, or a lot to fall back on would make it a very difficult process to go from jail to a regular productive john doe in society. No matter what the crime or punishment, wrongful imprisonment is horrible but how do you fix it? I don’t want innocent people in jail, heck I wouldn’t ever want to be in jail but at the same time how do you stop setting criminal free? What systems would work that would stop innocent people going to jail while still being able to convict those that are guilty. I don’t think there is such a system that is going to be full proof enough to stop these types of mistakes and it is very sad.
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Woman killed in crash outside home after police call off chase

Woman killed in crash outside home after police call off chase | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A woman is killed in a crash just metres from her own home after police earlier chased a car travelling at high speed in Tasmania's north.
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Brittney Ward's comment, November 13, 1:38 PM
Rachel I agree, this is a tricky situation to judge. I don't think the officer is responsible here. The driver chose to drive the car in that condition and refused to pull over for the police making him responsible for the accident.
Rob Duke's comment, November 13, 6:08 PM
Some courts have ruled that the appropriate metaphor is as if an officer has a stick between the cars that pushes the offender forward; while other courts have used a string metaphor that pulls the officer's vehicle along behind the fleeing offender. Officers are trained and, presumably, more rational than offenders, so I think we are correct to expect them to be able to use judgement and call off chases where there's no suspicion of serious wrong-doing; or when we know who the offender is and can pick them up later when we won't unduly jeopardize others. It's annoying to call off a pursuit, but it's often the right thing to do.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 15, 3:26 AM
This is a tragic case. They say that most vehicle accidents do occur not far from home, but this one is just sad. Im sure the department had to have some policy in place for chases. They were in a residential area and decided to not go the same speed as the person in the blue car. It is not the fault of the police, but of the driver of the blue car who continued to drive recklessly and kill a person. After an internal investigation Im sure the officers will be clear, but regardless I am sure they wish they could have prevented the accident from happening in the first place. Everything changes in an instant and its not like you can just get on your loud speaker and tell the drivers to stop, its out of the officers control.
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Albuquerque agrees to Justice Department deal and will overhaul its troubled police force

Albuquerque agrees to Justice Department deal and will overhaul its troubled police force | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The deal comes after heated protests over fatal shootings by Albuquerque police officers.
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 15, 3:35 AM
This article made me think of the article in segment 6 by Fyfe over the use of Police Discretion. How oversight and policy made the police departments lower their cases of police shootings and use of force. I think this department could benefit from the same, and should have looked into policy change before the Justice Department got involved and is making change for them. The vote was 8-0 so it was well in favor to support policy change within the department. The location of the department and what they deal with could also be a cause affect relationship Albuquerque has its challenges.
Rob Duke's comment, November 15, 3:10 PM
Liz, Good point. I'm reluctant only because the DOJ and FBI are hardly the stellar examples of human rights protectors. I'd rather see a citizen oversight board and office/citizens mediation for complaints. Rod: yes, as we've see with the Christopher Commission report (LAPD) and the Knapp Commission Report (NYPD), it takes a considerable amount of reprogramming to change these organizational cultures.
Rob Duke's comment, November 15, 3:12 PM
p.s. I'm throwing stones, but should note only about this particular aspect of law enforcement. Outside of human rights, which is something all those who exercise coercive power tend to have problems with, the DOJ and FBI are outstanding organizations. (There now maybe the black helicopters will stop following me).
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Two shot by Columbus police officer as his hand is pinned in door

Two shot by Columbus police officer as his hand is pinned in door | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Two people were shot yesterday afternoon by a Columbus police officer who opened fire after a door was slammed on his hand at a South Side home. Brian Bates, 44, was charged tonight with felony assault on a police officer, whose name hasn’t yet been released. Police say that Bates pinned the officer’s hand in the door. Police haven’t yet released the name of the 23-year-old woman who also was shot. She was not charged.
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Brittany Stahle's comment, November 12, 1:04 AM
I do not think the officer was at fault at all, he was in a vulnerable state where his hand was pinned in the door and being held there by a gentlemen on the other side of the door. The officer took matters into his own hand and shot bullets through the door to try to release his hand, not knowing what was happening on the other side. It is scary to imagine what the people inside could be doing, and so he did what he had to do.
Brandon Jensen's comment, November 12, 8:39 PM
I agree that the officer shouldn't be at fault for what had happened. It could have very well been a dangerous situation if things had escalated any more than they had. The officer said to let his hand go multiple times with no response or action taken to release his hand so he acted as he saw fit for the situation.
Rashaad's curator insight, November 12, 11:01 PM

I definitely do not like situation such as this one. When it comes to my point of view of the situation, I definitely do agree that the cop was in a vulnerable situation to the point where firing his gun was necessary because you never know what is on the other side of the door, and also based on the actions of the man who slammed the officers hand in the door. The only thing that caught my eye in the situation was the fact that there was nine bullets found in the house from the gun. Taking into consideration that I was not in the situation and have no idea how I would react, it is hard for me to come to a conclusion if that is excessive shooting. Based on what I know I do believe that the officer was in a position to shoot to kill and that may not have been his motive, but at the same time he was most likely shooting until his hand was released, which I can understand, especially if the officer had to go to the hospital to check if he had a broken hand. I do feel bad for the woman that was shot by the stray bullet just do to being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Although she might have been the lady, that the police were flagged down about, she still did not deserve to get shot. At the end of the day I’m just happy that everyone is okay.