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Man dies after police beating, cops suspended - Hindustan Times

Man dies after police beating, cops suspendedHindustan TimesEleven policemen including a Station House Officer (SHO) and an Inspector have been suspended after a man died after he was allegedly beaten up by them in ...and more »...
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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Paris Police Clear Out Migrant Camp and Destroy Tents

Paris Police Clear Out Migrant Camp and Destroy Tents | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The camp in north central Paris held 380 people, mostly from East Africa, who were moved to housing for asylum seekers or shelters.
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Different values, different rule of law....

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The onrushing wave

The onrushing wave | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
IN 1930, when the world was “suffering…from a bad attack of economic pessimism”, John Maynard Keynes wrote a broadly optimistic essay, “Economic...
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wow! 17% chance that firefighters jobs will be accomplished by a computer/machine in the next 20 years.

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How “Dilbert” Practically Wrote Itself

How “Dilbert” Practically Wrote Itself | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A few of our favorite cartoons – all based on real management blunders.
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Yup.  Sounds about right...

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Does the FBI have a secret surveillance air force? - CNNPolitics.com

Does the FBI have a secret surveillance air force? - CNNPolitics.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Senior Law Enforcement Official responded to an AP report, saying the FBI has a secret fleet of planes because they want to be as discreet as possible.
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Duh? Yeah, let's see...I'm flying a plane over area where a bank robber is working the area and I want to make this fact public?

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10 Core Competencies of Servant Leadership

10 Core Competencies of      Servant Leadership | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Servant-Leaders strive to become the best leaders possible each and every day. To do so means that they follow and are empowered by key characteristics that build a service-oriented consciousness (mind-set). Much of the research on servant leadership discuss the characteristics of a servant leader. Some researchers say servant leadership is seen as vision, influence, credibility, and trust. Others include emotional healing, creating value for the community, conceptual skills, empowering, helping subordinates grow and succeed, putting subordinates first, behaving ethically, relationships, and servant hood as key characteristics. One of my favorite researchers, K. Patterson, added another characteristic; Agapao love. She defined it as to do goodwill for another.


Via Mike Klintworth, Bobby Dillard
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The Kansas Supreme Court challenged Republicans' agenda. Their solution: Replace the judges.

The Kansas Supreme Court challenged Republicans' agenda. Their solution: Replace the judges. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Gov. Sam Brownback's tax-slashing crusade threatens to become a full-blown constitutional crisis.

Via Thomas Schmeling
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Shortage of deputies could threaten L.A. County sheriff's reform agenda

Shortage of deputies could threaten L.A. County sheriff's reform agenda | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
As Los Angeles County Sheriff Jim McDonnell tries to turn around a department under federal scrutiny for jail brutality, racial harassment and corruption, one of his most immediate challenges is a staffing shortage that could threaten his reform agenda.
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Federal judge accuses state of ethical lapses in prison case - The Sacramento Bee

Federal judge accuses state of ethical lapses in prison case - The Sacramento Bee | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In a high-stakes bid to wrest control of California's prison system from federal oversight, opposing lawyers for the state and for 33,000 inmates sparred Wednesday over whether the state violated legal ethics by interviewing mentally ill prisoners...

Via Doingtime2
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Doingtime2's curator insight, April 4, 2013 1:06 AM

The lawyers describe the sessions as being conducted in secret despite the legal requirement that they be present for all those tours and interviews.

"They interviewed our mentally ill clients without our knowledge about the case and then they used the evidence (to buttress their claims that conditions in the prisons have improved)," Don Specter, head of the Prison Law Office, told reporters after the hearing.

"They didn't really explain to the mentally ill clients what the purpose of the interviews were, so the inmates had no idea who they were speaking to, they had no idea for the reason."

Those interviews and the 50 expert declarations based on them that were filed with the court by the state now are at the heart of a heated dispute over whether California has made enough progress in improving access to mental health care at a constitutional level inside its prisons.

The inmate attorneys want the declarations thrown out, a move that would cripple the state's efforts in court to rid its self of the 23-year-old class action.


Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2013/03/27/5297978/federal-judge-accuses-state-of.html#.UVpnexHtdRQ.gmail#storylink=cpy

 

Nora ImmigrationReform Guadalajara's curator insight, December 27, 2013 5:20 PM

The lawyers describe the sessions as being conducted in secret despite the legal requirement that they be present for all those tours and interviews.

"They interviewed our mentally ill clients without our knowledge about the case and then they used the evidence (to buttress their claims that conditions in the prisons have improved)," Don Specter, head of the Prison Law Office, told reporters after the hearing.

"They didn't really explain to the mentally ill clients what the purpose of the interviews were, so the inmates had no idea who they were speaking to, they had no idea for the reason."

Those interviews and the 50 expert declarations based on them that were filed with the court by the state now are at the heart of a heated dispute over whether California has made enough progress in improving access to mental health care at a constitutional level inside its prisons.

The inmate attorneys want the declarations thrown out, a move that would cripple the state's efforts in court to rid its self of the 23-year-old class action.

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Here's What Could Happen If the Patriot Act Expires

Here's What Could Happen If the Patriot Act Expires | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
If the Patriot Act expires and the USA Freedom Act is not passed in its place, the government would lose three tools in the fight against terrorism, according to CNN. The NSA would not longer be allowed to collect metadata on Americans and store that data for five years, as they’re currently allowed to do under Section 215, and law enforcement couldn’t get roving warrants to track all of a terror suspect’s devices—they’d have to get individual warrants for each device. And the U.S. would no longer be legally allowed to use national security powers against “lone wolf” terrorists (i.e., not part of a known terror network), a power the government says it has never used. If the USA Freedom Act is passed, those last two powers would stay intact—only the metadata collection would be affected.
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JonHochendoner's comment, May 31, 7:58 PM
This program was instituted prematurely. I believe that letting portions of the bill expire, as future legislation can be passed while evaluating those provisions still on the books. As an aside, there is nothing patriotic about the Patriot Act and the Freedom Act does not protect freedom.
Rob Duke's comment, May 31, 9:56 PM
Prior to the Patriot Act, the Feds had most of the powers that it extended under the auspices of RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) act and the FISA (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act). RICO was directed at mobsters; and FISA was directed at the James Bond type of operatives. With the development of asymmetric warfare in this "newish" type of terror that came to the U.S. after 9/11 did not fall into the definitions allowed under either FISA or RICO, thus the need for something like the Patriot Act to allow surveillance with something like Reasonable Suspicion "lite". This made it possible to surveil and wiretap, plus do "sneak & peak" warrants without alerting the subjects that you were watching. I think it was prudent to enact, but liked the sunset clauses, so that the powers revert to the people when the threat expired or diminished. We always worried that the powers might get "sticky", but so far (and this debate seems to support this idea), Congress has been disinclined to tolerate these powers any longer than truly necessary. I think you're right to worry about it, though.
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Oklahoma troopers shoot man during high water response - CNN.com

Oklahoma troopers shoot man during high water response - CNN.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Highway patrol troopers in Oklahoma fatally shot a man whom they had been trying to get out of high water, authorities said.
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JonHochendoner's comment, May 31, 7:45 PM
The problem with stories like these is the lack of story. Two things are known. One, a man is dead. Two, the trooper is on administrative leave, not in jail. As is customary, the benefit of the doubt will go to the trooper.
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Fifth Amendment Flowchart

Fifth Amendment Flowchart | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Via Concerned Citizen, Jocelyn Stoller
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Jessica Leigh's comment, June 1, 7:09 PM
I think everyone should have flowcharts such as these. Many people are unaware when they do or do not have rights such as the Miranda rights. I think that ignorance to the law is what gets a lot of people in trouble and this flow chart sort of put it into layman’s terms in a more understandable way. I also think that people assume that they are expected to know their Miranda rights and don’t realize when they aren’t actually read. When they aren’t read, they may be under false arrest and never realize it.
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Police change must begin with recruiting and training

Police change must begin with recruiting and training | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
It only takes a few bad actors to give citizens the feeling that they aren’t respected by their own public servants.
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Rob Duke's comment, June 1, 1:10 AM
Even more so, is that first two years of training on the street. The academy is full of idealism, but the streets is where you're introduced to the paradoxes and gray areas, plus the rationale of how to cope. In some places, corruption equals coping. We put the 4 year vets in as training officers (and they jump on it because it leads to promotion), because we don't want to pay a Sergeant (nor does a Sergeant want to babysit) to train. To make a real change, we need to put some old wise officers into those positions and then pay them and give them the organizational prestige that they deserve. End of rant.
Yarima Lopez Rodriguez's comment, June 1, 4:14 AM
As long as the police and their political bosses remember that the purpose of the police is to protect the lives and property of those who obey the law against those who would destroy them everything should be fine. But now days, we see a lot of police force and police brutality against color individuals. Just because of their color they’re being treated different and looked at as criminals. Finding the right balance to protect and serve is the challenge, and every community is going to require a different means of finding that balance. Training does shape these men and women but I do believe that everything starts from the outside (society) when they start facing societal issues.
Rob Duke's comment, June 1, 4:35 AM
Ah, yes, but the basic inconsistency of society's demands are contained in your post: to whom do the police owe their allegiance? Is it to victims? Is it to their political overseers? If so, these individuals and groups often demand "get tough" policing. If the police are accountable to the community that they actually patrol in, then how do those folks demand recognition by a political system that often treats them as sub-citizen or even as invisible men and women?
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US senators call for mandatory reporting of police killings

US senators call for mandatory reporting of police killings | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Plan, announced one day after Guardian investigation, would force all US law enforcement agencies to report officer-involved killings to Department of Justice
Rob Duke's insight:

What will be reported?

1. Officers who directly shoot and kill a person(undoubtedly reported);

2. Officers who use some force that appears to be the proximate cause of death (good argument to report these, too);

3. Officers who place the person in some condition that results in death after a Coroner's inquest determines that the condition contributed to death (maybe these should be included);

4. Person dies for some uncertain reason while in custody or after having had contact with an officer(s) [debatable about whether these should be reported];

5. Person(s) killed while fleeing from officers (some sort of accidental death) [prob should not be included].

 

What else?

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8 White Lies We All Tell

8 White Lies We All Tell | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
8 White Lies We All Tell, Even the most honest people occasionally tell a fib or three. If you don't believe you sometimes lie, check out this list of eight
Rob Duke's insight:

Yup.  And not one of these is a Brady issue--unless the Chief wants you gone--then, any one of them could result in a termination.

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NYPD: Swedish tourist slashed aboard Brooklyn subway train

NYPD: Swedish tourist slashed aboard Brooklyn subway train | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (AP) — New York City police say are looking for the suspect who slashed a Swedish tourist on the neck as she rode the subway in Brooklyn. The attack occurred Monday evening as the 29-year-old victim and her father headed to Kennedy Airport on an A train.
Rob Duke's insight:

As NYPD pulls back from Zero-Tolerance and Stop-and-Frisk, does New York slide back into being Gotham?  If you follow Bratton's career, he brought Zero-Tolerance (an offshoot of George Kelling and James Q. Wilson's Broken Windows Theory) to the Transit Authority (subway cops).  After the subways were made safe through enforcing minor crimes like fare avoidance, spitting, etc., then Bratton brought his policies to NYPD proper.  The drop in crime closely matches these programs.

So, if crime is ticking up, what are the implications for police practice?  Do we accept Stop-and-Frisk as a necessary evil?

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Ex Cop Confronts Florida Cops Who Refused To Ticket Illegally Parked Cop Cars | Filming Cops

Ex Cop Confronts Florida Cops Who Refused To Ticket Illegally Parked Cop Cars | Filming Cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

What a dumbass...only marked patrol cars at court and the guy has a problem with lights, but not a decal on the door....

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David Whiting: Ever heard of the 1.5-second rule? For police with guns, it can separate life and death

David Whiting: Ever heard of the 1.5-second rule? For police with guns, it can separate life and death | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
I am in an Orange County Sheriff’s Department use-of-force class getting my keister kicked by virtual bad guys.After a series of loud, stern commands – OK, that and aiming a 9mm Glock – I think I have everything under control when a knife-wielding man standing over a body finally tosses away his weapon.“Get down on the ground,” I shout, confident my suspect will do just that. “Get down on the ground!”In a flash, the man charges me. I squeeze off a shot from point-blank range. But my shot is wild
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We Now Know Just How Many People Were Killed By Police This Year

We Now Know Just How Many People Were Killed By Police This Year | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An investigation by the Washington Post found the number of shootings was double the rate reported by the federal government.

Via steve batchelder, Jocelyn Stoller
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She Tried To Cause Chaos At The Border Patrol Station, BIG MISTAKE!

She Tried To Cause Chaos At The Border Patrol Station, BIG MISTAKE! | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
After all the police brutality stories going around the internet, we can’t help but wonder how many of these stories were fabricated to push the agenda of Obama’s gun control. Those 20-30 second video clips your friends are showing never
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Here's another one with the entire episode recorded.  It's interesting to have context.

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max mckernan's comment, June 1, 2:09 AM
i think that this is a very interesting incite into how much contexts changes a situation. with cameras being so readaly available now days and police being recorded more, it is interesting to see how people manipulate the context of the video.
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Management's Second Curve

Management has served us well. Since the Industrial Revolution it has paved the way for a sustained and accelerating rise in living standards unheard of and unforeseen. But with the ‘digital revolution’, we are entering a new era where the logic of industrial-age organisation has lost its purchase.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, May 31, 12:24 PM

Another fine article by Richard Straub from EFMD's Global Focus Magazine. 



Excerpt from the article: 


The decisions now being taken in labs, C-suites and boardrooms will affect everyone on the planet. To guide them, we need a management that is “good”, in both senses of the word, building on the best in humanity as well as better able to predict and bring about favourable outcomes.


It must acknowledge the reciprocal obligations it owes to society in return for the privileges conferred on the corporations that it runs.

It must put the “creative” back in the process of creative destruction by prioritising investment in customer- and market-creating innovation over short-term profits.


And it must use digital technologies to complement rather than substitute human effort, augment rather than automate human abilities. That is, add machine strengths to human strengths to do things that neither could do on their own, as Tom Davenport

has proposed.


In short, management is in need of a second curve that sets a new positive path away from the diminishing returns of the first.

Ian Berry's curator insight, May 31, 11:09 PM

Some great insights in the slideshare and looks like a great conference. The following on slide 4 is telling

 

“The great casualty of industrial-age philosophy, it is now clear, is the human being, reduced to just another resource that can be sacrificed to the short-term interests of shareholders and those who see it as their job to serve them”


I personally declared industrial age management dead more than 20 years ago. Remarkable leaders killed it long before that. If you're not embracing the new world of leadership and management you're already a dinosaur. The good news is it's not too late to change!

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How Police Unions and Arbitrators Keep Abusive Cops on the Street

How Police Unions and Arbitrators Keep Abusive Cops on the Street | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Officers fired for misconduct often appeal the decision and get reinstated by obscure judges in secretive proceedings.
Rob Duke's insight:

It's usually for due process violations.  It's not as important as to the kind of process that you have as it is to follow it.  If you don't have a clear process, then first have your political body pass one.  Even if this means you must pay the officer for an additional pay period or two, this is better than rushing through and having to reinstate the officer some time later (sometimes years pass).

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Rob Duke's comment, May 31, 9:47 PM
See Ted Lowi's work on "republic" small "r" to differentiate from the Republican party.
max mckernan's comment, May 31, 11:52 PM
I actually find this quite interesting because these officers brought up in this are clearly violating laws and code of conduct. These violations in the private sector would prevent you from ever working for that company again because you are more of a liability than a benefit. how does this not apply to the policing world where not only are you supposed to be protecting the citizens but being a role model? I also find it interesting that most of the cases are on the east coast. I think that these types of appeals between the unions and the state should be a matter of the public becasue after all that is who the police serve. Not making these hearings a public issue really takes away any faith the community has in ensuring justice.
Rob Duke's comment, June 1, 1:07 AM
Some state's have binding arbitration and the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) makes the decision. What I'd bet you're seeing is the ALJ saying, "you didn't follow you're process, so I don't even get to review the merits of the case. Return them to work." The agency then has the option to do a "do over" and a lot of them don't.
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Broward Shooting: Photo Raises Doubts About Police Story

Broward Shooting: Photo Raises Doubts About Police Story | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The newly emerged picture shows Jermaine McBean was wearing headphones when cops ordered him to drop an air rifle.
Rob Duke's insight:

Ear buds appear to have been in his ears, so he may not have been able to hear officers.

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DERRICK NELSON's comment, May 31, 4:24 PM
Police cover up for not investigating the situation further before deciding to fire their service weapon happens way too often. Remedial training really needs to focus on patient decision making while under distress dealing in cases such as this one. Definite identification of a threat should be assessed before pulling the trigger. Rubber bullets would have been more warranted in this case, so I think officers should have them loaded in their weapons first with an extra clip of regular rounds for backup.
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'Prison guards can never be weak': the hidden PTSD crisis in America's jails

'Prison guards can never be weak': the hidden PTSD crisis in America's jails | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
‘Eight and the gate’ is a corrections officer’s unofficial motto, but the hyper-vigilance of the job and the episodes of inmate violence take an extremely high toll. ‘We’re doing time too, we’re just getting paid for it’

Via marsdentherapy, Jocelyn Stoller
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marsdentherapy's curator insight, May 30, 5:39 PM

Very interesting article on the risk of psychological trauma amongst US prison officers. Makes me wonder about the stress placed on their British counter-parts, especially as the prison population has grown and resources have been cut.

Estefania Briceno's comment, May 31, 6:56 PM
This is a very interesting article, as a Psychology major I have never came across this issue in any of my previous classes even though PTSD is a very serious issue we often associate military as having the biggest rates of PTSD. Another issue that caught my eye with this article was how the percentage of what causes PTSD among prison guards was divided. The article argues that only 5% of PTSD is related to inmate violence and the biggest percentage 95% is related to the conditions at work. The article also argues that being exposed to the issues in the correctional facilities have a strong influence on how you behave outside prison “changing your personality”. I can see how always being in the lookout for possible treat against a correctional officer can have a significant change on how you behave outside the correctional facility, we can see this issue happing with police officers whenever they are off duty as well.
Jessica Leigh's comment, June 1, 6:49 PM
I was shocked to read that 34% of correction officers suffer from PTSD compared to the 14% of military veterans. I had never heard of these statistics before until now. Van Patten said they have control until an inmate decides to not be compliant and then they lose that control as quickly as they thought it was a routine day. Unlike veterans, they are always facing the ‘enemy.’ They are constantly on edge waiting for something to happen, there is no relief.
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Ropesville police chief arrested, charged with evidence tampering, abuse of office

Ropesville police chief arrested, charged with evidence tampering, abuse of office | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Ropesville Police Chief Ashley Ramirez was arrested by the Hockley County DA office Friday afternoon on three counts of Tampering with Evidence, 3rd degree felonies, and and one count of Abuse of O...
Rob Duke's insight:

When you see articles like this, it raises red flags.  Sometimes these are legit, but other times the various branches of government use the justice system as a political weapon.  I don't know which is happening here, but the mention of a new council and mayor suggests that this is a house cleaning.  In a year, it will be interesting to check back and see if any charges actually go to trial or result in a conviction.

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