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Pizza boy murderer sues police

Pizza boy murderer sues police | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
HE walked from jail into a forgiving embrace from his murder victim's father but Karl Kramer's return to society has been plagued by controversy.
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
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When Should We Start Forcibly Resisting Police Tyranny?

When Should We Start Forcibly Resisting Police Tyranny? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, make violent revolution inevitable.”
-President John F. Kennedy
Rob Duke's insight:

Whoa! WTH! So you think you want a revolution? We have a system that allows a bloodless coup every 2 years--and, that's at the Fed level.  At the local level, you can have a bloodless coup any time you need it.  It's called a recall election or a referendum (we call it an "initiative" if you need a law passed not one overturned).  We also have a tradition of local grand jury watch dogs.  It's just plain reckless to call for forcible resistance like this.  The problem with anarchy and revolution is that you never, NEVER! know what you'll be left with, and that's why a bloodless coup is such a wonderful device for radical, but orderly change.  This means that we put truth over justice, which is appropriate: truth is the precursor of justice and everyone gets a chance to contribute and negotiate the truth.  Revolution puts justice over truth and is a very one-sided version of truth.  In the end, justice alone or first is no justice at all and no revolution with this as the base can last long.  That's why every revolution "eats its own children".  We have the system for nearly perfect change if we search for truth, reasonableness, and human dignity.  Use the tools--don't be tempted by the shortcuts--and throw the bums out.  The other bums will take note and change or you can throw them out, too.  

 

End of rant.

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Rob Duke's comment, September 21, 2:46 AM
Coercive power is easy to attack because as one becomes powerful or uses power, it's scaled against four paradoxes: 1. paradox of Dispossession; 2. paradox of Detachment; 3. paradox of face; and 4. paradox of irrationality (see William Muir for the model). In other words, if you have something, they can take it from you (possession); or, if you care about something they can hold those things hostage (attachment). We have both of those in our lives, our property, and our communities. Also, in order to appear to be able to use force, sometimes you have to use it (saving face in order to maintain it); so, we're forced to use force in order to maintain the first two things we value possessions and attachments. Finally, irrationality, we're extremely susceptible to claims that we're irrational, thus, we have to be hyper-rational which weakens the first three paradoxes. How can I value and protect possessions when, in order to exercise power, I must sometimes use force that appears irrational? So, we see entire "ghetto" neighborhoods devolve as the folks in the community see cops withdraw literally and metaphorically, which means the citizens are forced to cope with the same paradoxes. Is it any wonder that no one has anything nice? You can't upset me by stealing or vandalizing when I don't have anything; and, I won't form attachments, so you can't hold me hostage. In order to keep you from intimidating me, I'll grow more fierce myself and do things to protect what little I have by appearing to be irrational (maybe more crazy than just pretending--your power over me is reduced when I'm irrational--how easy is it to intimidate the psycho homeless dude?). Pretty soon tit for tat and eye for an eye begins to take an enormous toll. Again, I think, and it's just one man's opinion, but the answer is truth first. It's a team sport, so we need to nurture those opportunities for teamwork and input. We need to do this way before the emergency so we have the trust to sustain us through these paradoxes.
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San Jose: Joe McNamara dies; iconic former police chief

San Jose: Joe McNamara dies; iconic former police chief | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
McNamara helped usher the city's police force into a era of national prominence in the law-enforcement world.
Rob Duke's insight:

He's the first Chief that I ever heard say that the war on drugs was dumb--I heard him say this when he led San Jose P.D. in the late 1980's.  He gave me the courage to look for myself and find that I agreed. He had studied Public Administration at Harvard's Kennedy school, so after retiring from SJPD, it was natural that he should be invited to join Stanford where he was an influential fellow at the Hoover Institute for the next 23 years.  That too has inspired many young cops to dare to believe that they, too, could earn Ph.D's and join the ranks of academia after walking the beat--he was my inspiration for that also.  I attended Field Training Officer (FTO) in 1990 and learned how SJPD trained officers in a systemic way to better groom officers through the early part of their career--this was a novel idea at the time--one of many he championed.  He embraced change and wasn't always popular for it, but we were all better for him having the courage to do so.  For almost a year, Chief McNamara has been fighting pancreatic cancer--today he lost that battle and we all lost one of the best minds in the business.

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Prosecutorial Misconduct and the "P" word

Prosecutorial Misconduct and the "P" word | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Using what you consider to be the ultimate pejorative word to describe someone critical of your work, Mr. Former D.A., is unethical, sexist, selfish and weak. Like most bullies are....
Rob Duke's insight:

The real topic of Brady v. Maryland, but it's been construed by prosecutors to be about lying officers.  It was originally aimed at prosecutorial misconduct (not that cops aren't often complicit when the time comes).

Another example of the far more powerful misuse of the power of the word...

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The subdued media response to murders of police officers

The subdued media response to murders of police officers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
By Stephen Owsinski

As the massive manhunt ensued for Eric Matthew Frein, who police say ambu...
Rob Duke's insight:

Same thing in '91, the perception was that crime was dropping and violence against police was also falling because line of duty deaths were down, but felonious assaults had climbed from 70k in the late 70's to 110k in 1991 just before the Rodney King incident (I only mention this because it was the touchstone event of the time; and, this is where these stats were revealed during the Simi Valley trial of the four officers). So, for the citizen, life looked like it was improving, but to us, we believed that we were under siege. Line of duty deaths at that time, as I alluded to above, were falling but only because body armor and tactics were making great strides at that time: Kevlar was being widely deployed; and, contact/cover had been developed by San Diego P.D. and was also being widely implemented.

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Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police, even with search warrants

Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police, even with search warrants | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
New operating system makes it impossible for company to comply with requests for data on devices.
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Clay Faris's comment, September 18, 4:06 PM
I'm pretty much a fan of anything that gives the federal government the middle finger though......
Rob Duke's comment, September 21, 2:48 AM
Lol--yeah a bit more constraint on the Fed's part is overdue...
Amanda McColley's comment, September 21, 4:10 PM
I guess I see this from the law enforcement side of things. So it's a bit upsetting to me because I see the bad guys using this new security policy for more bad things. Is there anything that says it would comply if a users phone could help identify a missing person or evidence of assault/abuse on a person? Or even something like child pornography, so if the bad guy keeps all their pictures of young children on their phone but doesn't upload it to the cloud, then Apple wouldn't help law enforcement with this? So that's just how I see it.
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It's Time for the U.S. to Ban Spanking

It's Time for the U.S. to Ban Spanking | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Studies show that spanking is harmful — and it doesn't work
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Heather Wiinikka's comment, September 18, 1:24 PM
I do not believe in having to spank your child. If your child is raised right with discipline, guidance, structure, routine, morals, and rules then they should know right from wrong. You know all parents tell their kids don't hit others but then parents turn around and hit/spank their kids which gives kids a mixed signal. I think a time out, maybe taking away there favorite toy for a while, grounded, or anything else but kids do not need to be spanked. I was spanked as a child and i told myself growing up i will never spank my kids and i have 4 kids and have never spanked them my other methods of discipline work just fine.
Rob Duke's comment, September 19, 12:50 AM
As a young parent, in the early 1990's, I too believed in mild spankings, but in the last 25 years, I believe teaching children how to empathize with others and use reason leads to more lasting behavior changes. I still think some safety issues may require the "shock" of spanking as when a child continues to try to run from a parent near a street, etc. But, it's like "practicing" medicine because as good as modern science is, we still don't understand child development any more than we understand the whole human body.
Amanda McColley's comment, September 21, 2:48 PM
Spanking is such a controversial topic. There are too many times I have had to remove myself from a situation because my own kids attitude has made me so upset, I know if I acted on impulse I would probably hit harder than intended. I think I have only spanked my daughter maybe twice and that's purely because nothing else worked with her but for the most part I've found that a diversion is the best way to change behavior. Parents who hit their children in public scare me the most because if they don't care that others will see them hit their children while in public, I can't imagine what could/would happen in the confines of their home. Plus these days it seems all too easy to lose your child to OCS with even the smallest complaint and I would never do anything to risk losing my kid. There are certain things that are interesting such as cultural differences in whats viewed as okay when it comes to disciplining their child. As we've seen with Adrian Peterson, he believes he is in no way an abuser, but hitting a child that causes bleeding is at least in my mind, completely unacceptable. If he had spanked his child in public and someone reported that then I would say that maybe there was an overreaction, but the pictures posted are astonishing and it makes me sad that anyone could see nothing wrong with it.
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Daniele Watts, actress claiming she was wrongfully detained for PDA, seen straddling boyfriend in car in new photos 

Daniele Watts, actress claiming she was wrongfully detained for PDA, seen straddling boyfriend in car in new photos  | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Daniele Watts said she was doing "nothing wrong" before being accosted by police and placed in handcuffs on Sept. 11.
Rob Duke's insight:

See my earlier post about people lying about their contacts with the police...happens more often than we'd like to admit.  They often have fooled themselves or have blurred the lines of definition: "I did not have sex with that woman"

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Tonya Metteer Howell's comment, September 18, 3:14 AM
“A picture is worth a thousand words!” Professor, I absolutely agree with your implied assertion that justification of any act is possible when lines of definition are blurred. This behavior in a public place absolutely deserved attention and I commend the citizens and police who participated in mitigating the scene for their fairness and courtesy. As a mother of three, I would have no problem reporting such behavior as lewd and inappropriate. In fact, if it is true that her breasts were exposed at some point, I would definitely want to press public indecency charges. There is no reason for two adults to behave that way in a public venue and trying to argue semantics and/or flat out lie about it simply depicts an immaturity and indecency not deserving of publicity or fame. If I had watched this woman’s television show before, I certainly would not now. Furthermore, her pathetic attempt at citing racial inequality is disgusting and embarrassing for other African Americans. She is not a good role model and not a true representation of a strong African American woman. No matter what color her skin pigment, her behavior deserves punitive action."
Rob Duke's comment, September 19, 12:53 AM
Tonya, I spent the summer in L.A. for medical treatment and had forgotten the culture here. Cop bashing is just good p.r. and, my belief, is that this actress probably helped her exposure with this incident, not, as we would expect from the "heartland" that she would hurt her reputation.
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Comcast Denies It Will Cut Off Customers Who Use Tor, The Web Browser For Criminals

Comcast Denies It Will Cut Off Customers Who Use Tor, The Web Browser For Criminals | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Some users of the anonymous web browser Tor have reported that Comcast has threatened to cut off their internet service unless they stop using the legal software. 

Comcast completely denies their claims. In a blog post, the company said "We have no policy against Tor, or any other browser or software. Customers are free to use their Xfinity Internet service to visit any website, use any app, and so forth."

According to a report on Deepdotweb, Comcast customer representatives have branded Tor "illegal" and told customers that using it is against the company's policies.

 

MORE:  http://finance.yahoo.com/news/comcast-threatening-cut-off-customers-092817979.html


Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Rob Duke's insight:

The Dark Web, Pirate Bay, Tor, and other new technologies; combined with alternative currencies (e.g. Bitcoin) mean that the police must think about strategy, tactics, logistics and even the philosophy of law so that we are prepared to fight crime when it moves elsewhere in the institutional framework....

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Clay Faris's comment, September 18, 3:38 PM
Rob do you believe the police (or any leo agency for that matter) will ever really be able to keep up with the onion folks? The very nature of the deep web prevents snooping or spying (unless the website owner/manager is a moron and posts the info in a Tweet like the genius who used to operate The Silk Road did). And say what you want about the legitimacy or legality of the deep web, what it represents (besides the bad things) is real, true free market. Maybe the last one on the planet. How do you apply for a search warrant to search for the unsearchable? I'm not suggesting we don't try......there are things lurking in the darkness of the deep web that should make us all disgusted and afraid (child porn), and there are monsters that live there who ought never see the light of day. I just don't know that the police are up to the challenge of cracking that particular nut. The traditional emphasis on squeaky clean backgrounds for police applicants means that we're negating a large pool of people with the exact skillset we need to be utilizing. Curious your thoughts on that.
Rob Duke's comment, September 19, 12:25 AM
Clay, I'm working on a theory [neo-institutionalism--nothing to do with the matrix, btw (Neo reference aka attempted humor)] that I'll share when we finally meet in person (I'll come ride along or something). The short version is that I'm not sure we should try. I think Elinor Ostrom has it right when she argues that we need to make room with the tall impersonal institutional rule structures (what I call "in the shadow of the law") for ad hoc citizen behavior. While Ostrom won the Nobel Prize in economics for this idea as it applies to "scarce common pool resources" (i.e., clean air, limited fish & game, clean water, etc.), I think the same concept can apply very well to the intangibles that exist between your front door and mine that we share just like clean air (e.g. peace, safety, quality of life, a sense of place). I worry that we create too many absolutes that search out underground economies and enforcement structures that are policed only by warlords, strongmen and cartels and we would be better off to bring these back into the sunshine and regulation. Does that make sense? I have a diagram model that I think explains it better.
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Open-Minded Listening by Jonathan R. Cohen :: SSRN

Open-Minded Listening by Jonathan R. Cohen :: SSRN | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Parties in conflict do not typically listen to one another well. On a physical level they hear what their counterparts say, but on a deeper level they do not t
Rob Duke's insight:

The Fresno Pacific, PeaceMaking Model, developed by Ron and Roxanne Claassen (and others), suggests having parties summarize what the other party has said and to keep doing so until the other party agrees that that is indeed what they said/meant.

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'Django Unchained' Actress Explains Why She Refused To Give LAPD Her ID

As previously reported, last week two Studio City police officers in Los Angeles detained and allegedly mistook "Django Unchained" star Daniele Watts for a prostitute after they saw her -- reportedly fully clothed -- kissing boyfriend and c...
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a good one to help explain the readings a little better:

 

More comes out on this story:

 

Actress' perspective: American's (and cops) still can't accept an inter-racial relationship.

Cops: someone called to say a prostitution transaction is occurring in a car (in that area, that sounds consistent).  Now I see a skinny black chick kissing some white "john" in a car.  Maybe, maybe not, let's see....

 

Actress perspective: I'm being harassed and I don't feel like cooperating.

Cop perspective: look, someone called me.  If you just give me your I.D., I can log this and we can all get on with our lives.

 

Actress perspective: someone has to take a stand.

Cop perspective: woah! innocent people don't act like this, maybe this person is involved in something (plus, don't screw with the po-po because I can make things uncomfortable and I will so you won't develop a habit of this).

 

Like Dennis Miller used to say: That's my perspective, but I could be wrong....

 

There's never enough hours in the day, but a little neighborhood garden tending might be in order.  Hold some meetings, bring a little food, gets people there so they can meet the neighbors.  That builds cop/citizen relationships and gets people talking with one another.  That reduces feelings of "they just don't like us" and "we don't like 'those people' here".

 

This is the idea of soft power at work (velvet glove).  It has to be done early and often (like caring for a garden); then like a battery it builds up your power (and legitimacy) for times when you have no choice but to use your hard power (iron fist).

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San Bernardino man in standoff captured after shooting at kids, cops

San Bernardino man in standoff captured after shooting at kids, cops | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
SAN BERNARDINO >> A man shot at a group of people surrounding an ice cream truck on Sunday afternoon and then retreated into his home, prompting evacuations and a response from the Police Department’s SWAT team.He shot at officers
Rob Duke's insight:

...shooting at kids and the ice cream truck!

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Brittany Stahle's comment, September 15, 8:16 PM
According to the article they have had issues with this man before several times concerning his dog and the neighbors. It would be scary knowing one of your neighbors were dangerous where they act out with force as he did. Having this incident where children were put into harm would be terrifying and this man should be charged. I could not imagine just walking out of my house to get ice cream from the ice cream truck and all of a sudden I am being shot at. I am very glad no one was injured and everyone made it out okay.
Sarah O'Leary's comment, September 18, 1:01 AM
Wow, this is definitely a headline that could have easily been another tragedy. It sounds like with all the issues this person was having were mental or social disorders and he obviously needed some help or at the very least shouldn't have had weapons at his disposal.
Rob Duke's comment, September 19, 12:56 AM
This is bad, but I couldn't help but think of some humorous responses as well.
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How the Criminal Justice System Impacts Well-Being - Collateral Consequences - YouTube

To watch the full discussion or to learn more about the Well-Being Initiative, visit www.wellbeinginitiative.org In this clip from the Charles Koch Institute...

Via Concerned Citizen, up2-21
Rob Duke's insight:

See Therapeutic Jurisprudence as a theory base.

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Homeland Security Today: New York City Adopts RFID Tags to Track First Responders

Homeland Security Today: New York City Adopts RFID Tags to Track First Responders | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Homeland Security Today is the leading source for independent news and analysis on homeland security affairs
Rob Duke's insight:

Can these be hacked?

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Ricky Osborne's comment, September 15, 2:26 AM
These RFID tags that will be attached to first responders is a great idea. The tragic event of September 11, 2001 showed that a new system needed to be in placed in order to ensure the safety of first responders. Many lost their lives trying the save others from the devastation of that days events. These RFID chips will aid in that quest as each first responders location will be tracked through a computer system. If they themselves are need of aid, they will be able to be tracked and their location found in an effective manner. The implementation of this new technology show that “the rules of the game” can change for the better.
Shelly DeWilde's comment, September 15, 3:20 AM
I don't believe that the RFID trackers can be hacked because it has a base that sends out a specific code to the tags within a certain perimeter, I think of my bluetooth stereos however the base has discretion on who it lets in. I think that this idea is great in fast paced dangerous jobs that require that everyone be accounted for. I hear that they want to use this technology on the people in grade schools like staff and students, I think that idea will create a lot of debate.
Rob Duke's comment, September 15, 3:22 AM
Thanks for the additional info...
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Blacks Don’t Have a Corporal Punishment Problem

Blacks Don’t Have a Corporal Punishment Problem | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“While 70 percent of Americans approve of corporal punishment,” wrote sociologist Michael Eric Dyson for the New York Times on Wednesday, “black Americans have a distinct history with the subject. Beating children has been a depressingly familiar habit in black families since our arrival in the New World.” Dyson was...
Rob Duke's insight:

For an excellent discussion of the "ghetto" behaviors as a legacy of slavery and not inherent Black culture, see Thomas Sowell's "Black Rednecks: White Liberals.  Sowell is another Hoover fellow who served with McNamara who I mentioned yesterday.  Sowell also wrote the quintessential book on Marx: Marxism: Philosophy and Economics.

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How Philosophy Makes You a Better Leader

How Philosophy Makes You a Better Leader | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An exercise to help you understand your behavior.
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The Underreported Story of the Past 20 Years

The Underreported Story of the Past 20 Years | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
I'm not suggesting that crime isn't a problem in the United States. It is a problem, particularly with regard to violent crimes involving firearms, but it is a problem that has diminished over recent decades....
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's a related article that addresses the issue of media coverage of crime such that the perception and fear of crime is still high at a time when crime has actually dramatically fallen...this may be another reason why the media drifts to cop abuse stories in an attempt to maintain the Dirty Laundry sensationalism of "kick 'em when they're up, kick 'em when they're down" (to quote Don Henley's song on the same subject of how the media reports, which if you haven't heard it, can be found at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0xr31XbSOU).

This relates again to the article/chapter in Muir where I showcase the dangers of not only the power of coercion (the power of the sword), but also the power of the reciprocity (the power of the purse), and perhaps most importantly, the power of moral persuasion (the power of the word or power of the pen).  All three of the sources of power can be used for good or evil, but we still just like to act like the power of the sword is the only one to worry about.

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School to Prison Pipeline Slowed in Los Angeles

School to Prison Pipeline Slowed in Los Angeles | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The “school to prison” practices that have become so common place in disciplinary practices in schools all across America are about to end in school districts in Los Angeles.
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LOS ANGELES TIMES CARTOON: Why the Fuzz Pulled You Over

LOS ANGELES TIMES CARTOON: Why the Fuzz Pulled You Over | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Crime is falling in California. Yet the state’s police agencies have one of the highest concentrations of surplus military hardware in the United States. People started paying more attention to a post-9/11 Defense Department program to transfer military gear used against Afghanistan and Iraq to civilian police departments here in the United States in the […]
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The Painkiller Abuse Problem Doctor's Can't Stop

The Painkiller Abuse Problem Doctor's Can't Stop | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
State laws aren't doing much against a growing overdose epidemic
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Heather Wiinikka's comment, September 18, 12:58 PM
I think it should get to the point where if a patient continually comes in for pain drugs there has to be a point where the doctor stops prescribing them. If the patient is seriously in pain then the doctors need find out what is going on with them and and fix it. Another, thing that i think should happen and i am sure it can be done today with the technology we have is there should be a data base set up throughout all pharmacy's that will only allow a person a certain amount of pills a prescriptions of pain pills in a year, because many people will jump from Dr. to hospital just seek pain pills but if we have this database and person get multiple prescriptions then it will red flag them and it will tell the pharmacist that they can not fill that prescription.
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Grand jury gets an extension

Grand jury gets an extension | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The grand jury hearing evidence in the Michael Brown case has until Jan. 7 to decide on charges.
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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, September 18, 4:14 AM
I think this article is a really hard case. At first it does seem as a police officer was abusing his power, but when I read that the guy who was killed was reaching a gun, my opinion changed. I think that’s how the officers are trained, if someone is reaching their gun they will defend themselves and the public around them. Of course, I do think that 6 bullets is too much, and if I would be the officer I would shoot the legs of a guy and not the head or a body. This case sure need some more involvement from the jury, and the court, but I think the officer should have to be responsible for what he did. As is I said, even if it was necessary to shoot, he could’ve slotted that guy’s legs and not the body.
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Transformational Leadership Survey

Transformational Leadership Survey | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A short survey designed to help you assess your Transformational Leadership skills.

Via Susan Bainbridge
Rob Duke's insight:

How well are you equipped to change an organization?

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Pierre Galeon's curator insight, September 21, 2:49 PM

It is not necessarily in the genes you can work at it.

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Urban Outfitters Hits New Low With Faux Blood-Stained Kent State Sweatshirt

Urban Outfitters Hits New Low With Faux Blood-Stained Kent State Sweatshirt | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In its endless quest to seem edgy, Urban Outfitters has gone too far once more.

The store offered a one-of-a-kind Kent State University sweatshirt splattered with red coloring for $129. The tactless garment is a clear reference to the 1970 killing...
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Militarized police in America. Scranton Police disrespecting a woman and more!!! - YouTube

Bringing (connected) dude's along for a arrest warrant, seizing property without owners consent. Thats how things are done in Scranton, PA i guess they think...
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's some of those Paradoxes that you'll see in Muir's article/chapter on the "professional police" in an upcoming segment.  The more power we wield (particularly hard power), the more we are vulnerable to one of the four paradoxes of coercive power:

Paradox of Dispossession

Paradox of Detachment

Paradox of Face

Paradox of Irrationality

Here, a "relaxed" version of all the officer safety tools that save law enforcement lives when things become exigent, are construed to be irrational (and look a little silly).  You can see that the tactical guys feel like the only guys that showed up in tuxes for a little garden party.

It'd be nice to have more facts, but it seems like this might be something between neighbors that got out of hand (the comment about trespassing and cctv make me think that).  I can certainly see that this woman is pugnacious and that can make an entire neighborhood tense (though, as I said, there's not enough facts here to know the whole story).

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Sarah O'Leary's comment, September 18, 1:12 AM
First of all, the background of this story is not given. I think the publisher of the video believes they did nothing wrong where it is clear they committed a crime for the police to show up. Some of the things said were taken out of context I'm sure and some of the things that were "subtitled" were things that I couldn't clearly hear. The only thing that is clear is that this person wanted to video tape the cops so that they could find any little slip up to bust them, while they themselves were clearly being busted for a crime committed.
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, September 18, 4:27 AM
To me, this is a clear abuse of police power. They didn’t have any rights to enter the house or to arrest them. I am also kind of surprised how rude they were and they weren’t playing by law. I kind of got a feeling that they wanted to just take them from the beginning. In my opinion these actions of police were unprofessional and unlawful.
Rob Duke's comment, September 19, 12:43 AM
Alex, You can see that awkwardness from the cops who are dressed all rambo as compared with the ones who are more casual. It's like showing up at a party in costume when no one else opted for the dress up theme. I'd be uncomfortable with the chit/chat that goes on in front of the camera, I couln't make out the little jokes, but it's a good reminder not to engage in banter at the scene.
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New Mike Brown Shooting Video May Support Claims Of Surrender

New Mike Brown Shooting Video May Support Claims Of Surrender | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A man is heard saying Mike Brown surrendered, and witnesses are seen with their hands in the air moments after the shooting.
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Django Unchained Actress Accosted by LAPD After Kissing White Husband

Django Unchained Actress Accosted by LAPD After Kissing White Husband | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Danièle Watts, an African-American actress who played Coco in Django Unchained and appears as Martin Lawrence's daughter on FX's Partners, says she was handcuffed and detained on Thursday by police in Los Angeles who suspected she was a prostitute.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's one of those paradoxes that I talked about in the Black Board posts.  Citizen's call and we want to make them happy.  In this case, another citizen's rights were arguably infringed upon to do so...what do you think?  If one citizen thinks another is suspicious and they call us; and we arrive and think "hmm, this might be racist b.s." should we just move on?

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Tonya Metteer Howell's comment, September 18, 3:22 AM
I absolutely agree with Angie that gathering facts is imperative for police actions. That being said, some situations are hurried and quick thinking needs to be applied. With this entire situation, the fact that someone else asked the two of these people to cease their questionable behaviors for the sake of others, yet they did not comply, depicts to me a personality of selfishness and immaturity. People have rights, yes, but those rights should allow others' rights to remain protected. Obviously, in this situation, the social order was disrupted and citizens felt a need to defer to police. The fact that the race card was attempted to be used should not be applicable to the situation because the call was concerning lewd conduct, of which she was certainly guilty. People can justify there actions whether they have substantive evidence or not. This particular situation warranted police intervention and the violations had nothing to do with skin color.
Clay Faris's comment, September 18, 3:55 PM
I'll use another example that we run into fairly regularly here in Alaska. The ubiquitous "man with a gun" call. I'll stipulate the situation isn't quite the same, but I believe it's close enough to make the point. Cops get a call about a "man with a gun" who is "scaring" people. Cops respond and contact the man who is simply walking down the street. He's not threatening anyone, not brandishing the weapon, he's just minding his own business and exercising his 2nd Amendment rights. At that point do I, as a police officer, even have the right to identify the man? He is engaging in zero criminal behavior, so on what grounds can he be detained? A "suspicion" isn't enough. A citizen who is freaked out because the man has a gun isn't enough. It's not illegal in Alaska for the man to carry a gun. Does that mean the cops just go away? No......we need to determine these things before moving on, but it's a very fine line and a difficult one to walk at times, particularly if the man is unwilling (with good reason imho) to identify himself. I'm not familiar with LAPD procedures, or California law in particular, so I cannot speak to whether or not an officer can demand ID during suspicious circumstances when it is quickly determined that no criminal behavior has taken place. In this particular case it seems the police were justified in detaining the parties involved, because there was concern of a criminal activity taking place.
Amanda McColley's comment, September 21, 4:02 PM
Seeing stuff like this is upsetting at first glance but after hearing things like she wouldn't provide her name then yeah you can definitely understand why she was at least detained. While it is upsetting to see or think that police overreacted in this situation, I've heard of other situations where right away the individuals contacted automatically jump to things like they are being stereotyped based on age, race, gender or even social status. Since she is "famous" she was probably not wanting to attach the situation to her name, but she should be wise enough to know to cooperate when contacted by police especially if she did nothing wrong. I like what Clay said too about seeing a guy with a gun in Alaska. Since it's something some of us are not used to seeing people wearing guns so it can make someone feel uncomfortable. Sure it''s legal in Alaska, but you never know if the person who carries the gun is sane either so I guess it's good that people care enough to call the police just to be safe but at the same time there are plenty of overreactions too.