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Drone 'kills Pakistan Taliban chief'

Drone 'kills Pakistan Taliban chief' | Police Problems | Scoop.it
The Pakistani Taliban's second-in-command has been killed in a suspected US drone strike, a senior militant source tells the BBC.

Via @NewDayStarts, Rob Duke
Melissa's insight:

I am a strong supporter of drone attacks on terrorist.  This guy killed 9 people in 2009 and should have been killed sooner.  The more terrorist killed the better off Americans are.  They contiue to plan attacks on innocent poeople and spread hate for no logical reason.

 

 

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Joshua Livingston's comment, November 11, 2013 12:44 AM
I have no problem with the use of drones to attack people. As much as people want to say that killing is wrong, it comes down to mainly one thing let the other guy die for his country rather than one of our men die for ours.
Michael McColley's comment, November 15, 2013 1:21 AM
I remember hearing about this in the news when it first happened. I think it's good that we got rid of one the top terrorists in the world and especially when how much Pakistani Taliban help the Afghanistan Taliban out over here. Having said that how far does this go though we gonna start using this kind of stuff on American soil cause i bet we do.

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Rescooped by Melissa from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Recidivism down, treatment up for Alaska convicts, officials say

Recidivism down, treatment up for Alaska convicts, officials say | Police Problems | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — Alaska convicts have been less likely to reoffend in recent years and more likely to complete in-prison substance abuse treatment programs, state officials told lawmakers on Monday.

Via Rob Duke
Melissa's insight:

The sign of lowering the number of reoffenders in the jail system is a positive move towards a much needed issue.   The funds given to programs to help and treat offenders when in jail and also while on probation has a postive outcome but still does not fully address the real problem of overcrowding in the alaska jail system.

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Joshua Matheny's comment, November 13, 2013 5:03 PM
Hey Maria, I just wanted to address that with you, I think I am in your Ethics and Justice class too. FCC is a holding jail. It is not a full on center that holds a constant prison population. It is more minor offenses and those who do not need to be transferred to a bigger more permanent facility. They probably figured your son was not a violent threat for a DUI, therein placing him with others like himself in a more general area, especially if he stayed only for a few days time. FCC isn't overcrowded, it just holds different amounts of people at different times. However, yes you are definitely correct most jails are extremely overcrowded :(.
Jonathan Reed's comment, January 27, 2014 3:16 AM
This is what it comes down too. Shoving people into prisons isn't going to solve the underlining issues that press the community. What needs to be done is that programs need to be created that help and assist newly released inmates in finding jobs and maintain them. Helping them find stable residence and helping them with their personal issues (counseling) are just a few of the things that can be done. But what Alaska is doing to great and I'm surprised that more states aren't doing it. This entire article can be summed up by restated what was said by Alaska Department of Correction Deputy Commissioner Ron Taylor, "the state began to seriously look at recidivism rates with the start of the 2007 report and worked to increase the availability of in-prison treatment as well as provide better services for inmates once they are released. That work has paid off, he said and the completion rates for in-prison substance abuse treatment rose to 65 percent in 2013, up from 45 percent in 2010."
Rob Duke's comment, January 27, 2014 3:19 AM
Agreed: it's not sustainable for one thing and it's just not effective for another.
Rescooped by Melissa from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Did Montana newlywed blindfold husband before pushing him off cliff?

Did Montana newlywed blindfold husband before pushing him off cliff? | Police Problems | Scoop.it
A Montana newlywed may be accused of blindfolding her husband before pushing him off cliff, court documents say.

Via Rob Duke
Melissa's insight:

Well very interesting case, the blind fold theory has a huge impact on the case becuse it does show a sign of premedition.  Considering that the blindfold was used it is should still be considered a murder case.  She killed her husband and the text she sent was proof she knew something bad was going to happen, knowing that why would she go with him to the top of a cliff.

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Brittany Stahle's comment, November 18, 2013 9:17 PM
This case is very interesting and I do want to know what really happened. She is making herself look very guilty by lying to the police and sending those texts to a friend. it looks as if she was planning the murder out. If it comes out that she did use the blind fold she should be charged with murder. I really would like to see how this plays out.
Brix Hahn's comment, December 19, 2013 11:45 PM
This case is extremely fishy if Jordan blindfolded her husband before she allegedly pushed him off a cliff or not. If she did blindfold him, that adds a new layer of intent and responsibility to the crime, but if she didn’t, then we’re just looking a run of the mill murder trial. I mean, her family said the marriage was weird from the beginning, so maybe there is some extra intent on Jordan’s side.
Zach White's comment, December 20, 2013 7:08 PM
This doesn't pass the smell test, she say's she pushed him, and that it was an accident, and now they found a blindfold... She should have gotten her story straight beforehand.
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California study examines titanic shift in criminal justice

California study examines titanic shift in criminal justice | Police Problems | Scoop.it
The Stanford Criminal Justice Center's eye-opening report is the first comprehensive look at how those involved in the most sweeping correctional experiment in recent history really feel about it.

Via Rob Duke
Melissa's insight:

One thing to look at and consider a reform on the death penality process.  It would be interesting to know how many are on death row in California, how long they have been on death row and the cost to the state for death row inmates.  I would suggest a refom on the process to speed up the process and lower the cost to the state, I undertand that they have rights but they also were convicted of hanous crimes to put themselves there to begin with.

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Carlie Bailey's comment, November 15, 2013 12:16 AM
I think that our justice system does need a change and I support California's initiative. I think that there will definitely be some kinks that will need to get worked out, and it will take time before they will be able to see a difference probably. But I think that a change is necessary. I like the GPS tracking device also.
James Greer's comment, November 21, 2013 6:29 PM
I agree that our justice system needs a major overhaul. I think the system should be more focused on solving the problem that is causing people to commit crimes, and helping them get away from that, more than just treating a symptom (incarcerating every person who crosses the road incorrectly). But more interesting is this experiment: when you change the people paying for the system, different people take notice of just how expensive it really is--and how ineffective it has become.
James Greer's comment, November 21, 2013 6:31 PM
To Melissa: I'm not sure how I feel about the death row process. It's better to let a hundred guilty men go free than to execute a single innocent man--in my opinion, and it certainly isn't an original one. On that note, a whole lot of death row inmates have been released lately after being "convicted" when new evidence came to light months, years, sometimes more than a decade after the conviction. So if you remove all of those safeguards, and speed up the process, you remove the chance of that evidence turning up in time.
Rescooped by Melissa from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Drone 'kills Pakistan Taliban chief'

Drone 'kills Pakistan Taliban chief' | Police Problems | Scoop.it
The Pakistani Taliban's second-in-command has been killed in a suspected US drone strike, a senior militant source tells the BBC.

Via @NewDayStarts, Rob Duke
Melissa's insight:

I am a strong supporter of drone attacks on terrorist.  This guy killed 9 people in 2009 and should have been killed sooner.  The more terrorist killed the better off Americans are.  They contiue to plan attacks on innocent poeople and spread hate for no logical reason.

 

 

more...
Joshua Livingston's comment, November 11, 2013 12:44 AM
I have no problem with the use of drones to attack people. As much as people want to say that killing is wrong, it comes down to mainly one thing let the other guy die for his country rather than one of our men die for ours.
Michael McColley's comment, November 15, 2013 1:21 AM
I remember hearing about this in the news when it first happened. I think it's good that we got rid of one the top terrorists in the world and especially when how much Pakistani Taliban help the Afghanistan Taliban out over here. Having said that how far does this go though we gonna start using this kind of stuff on American soil cause i bet we do.