Polar lands
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Kylie Taylor from Just real interesting
Scoop.it!

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | Polar lands | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2014 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 22, 2015 9:39 PM

This article shows how crops were entirely different 8,000 years ago. It shows how much we have breeded and affected the natural crops. With the example of peaches, watermelons, and corn, the article shows how the natural crop didn't taste as good and was a lot smaller. The natural peach had 64% edible food; whereas the 2014 peach had 90% edible food. The pictures comparing the natural and artificial crops also illustrated how the many varieties of that specific crop had grown and where the crop is found has grown. Lastly, the diagrams compares the water and sugar percentages. This article paints a good picture as to how much mankind has affected our land and agriculture. Also, how much our crops have changed due to selective breeding.

 

The article gives a good illustration of topics in Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use. The article shows how selective breeding has affected many crops. It gives a good view as to how selective breeding and agriculture has been affected and changed in the Neolithic Agriculture Revolution. The article explains what what life was like and how it changed in the Neolithic times. This article is really interesting in showing how crops were changed.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:41 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

Rescooped by Kylie Taylor from IRDI
Scoop.it!

Around The Arctic, Frozen Earth Is Thawing And Creating ‘Drunken Forests’

Around The Arctic, Frozen Earth Is Thawing And Creating ‘Drunken Forests’ | Polar lands | Scoop.it
While some skeptics say the Arctic is doing just fine, Alaska and the Hudson Bay Lowlands tell a different story.

Via Steven Putter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kylie Taylor from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You

6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You | Polar lands | Scoop.it
From the food we eat to the energy, transportation, and water we all need, a warmer world will bring big changes for everyone.

 

B Sinica: This article touches every aspect of geography from culture to climate [considering] how the growing population plays the biggest role in determining the future of life on Earth.  People need to recognize the problems and potential future issues with global warming and the rapidly changing environment.  Though not many issues can be prevented or even solved, the least we can do is try to lessen the severity of devastation and prolong the current conditions as much as possible before the world becomes too extreme to manage.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:22 PM
It is kind of a scary thought that global warming could greatly disrupt the way we live. Everyone is affected by it especially businesses like farms. The production of crops declines because of the excessive heat. Changing climate affect the length of each season which hurts the process of growing and harvesting crops. There would also be a change in the production, storage and transportation. It will cost more money to properly manage these businesses. This change will not only affect companies and how we handle our food but also our way of life and health. We would all have to adapt to such drastic changes in the environment which may be a struggle for some. Health wise, if it is too hot and people are not well adapted then it could lead to hospitalization and increased health risks. I don’t think there is much we can do to lessen the severity because it is a natural cycle of earth. I do think we may have sped up the process a little bit, for example car exhaustion and greenhouse gasses. But we are so dependent on such technology we can’t just make it disappear.
Dillon Cartwright's comment, May 3, 2013 4:04 PM
It's crazy that something like a little climate change can change the affect the entire world. Not just in one way either, it affects the world in many ways, like the 6 mentioned above. I don't think people realize the frailty of the environment they live in. Something as small as someones car exhaust becomes kind of a big deal when there are hundreds of millions of cars in the world.
In addition to that, I think it's great that life expectancy has gone up with cures to diseases and advances in modern medicine. It's a good thing that people are living longer lives, but it's a problem when these people aren't environmentally conscious. If there is going to be a consistent increase in population, there should also be an increase in environmental awareness so everyone can work together in slowing down this destructive process.
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:03 PM

Climate change is going to affect how we live in the future. It will cause lack of food, energy sources, health risks, climate changes, drought etc. It is because of our growing population and the amount of people the world has to take care of for all of us to survive. We are also using too many of its resources too quickly. What could we do now to try to slow down the process of it happening? 

Rescooped by Kylie Taylor from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Melting Glaciers Transform Alpine Landscape

Melting Glaciers Transform Alpine Landscape | Polar lands | Scoop.it
Climate change is dramatically altering the Swiss Alps, where hundreds of bodies of water are being created by melting glaciers. Though the lakes can attract tourists and even generate electricity, local residents also fear catastrophic tidal waves.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 4:45 AM

What can we do learn of this? Will send this to my students.

Lorraine Chaffer's comment, July 4, 2013 10:36 PM
Inland water - management
Lorraine Chaffer's comment, July 4, 2013 10:36 PM
Climate change impacts
Scooped by Kylie Taylor
Scoop.it!

Researchers Discover Massive Ice Channels in Antarctica - Nature World News

Researchers Discover Massive Ice Channels in Antarctica - Nature World News | Polar lands | Scoop.it
Nature World News Researchers Discover Massive Ice Channels in Antarctica Nature World News Massive ice channels have been found floating beneath ice-shelves in Antarctica, with some as tall as the Eiffel tower and stretching hundreds of miles...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kylie Taylor
Scoop.it!

Alaska sinks as climate change thaws permafrost

Alaska sinks as climate change thaws permafrost | Polar lands | Scoop.it
The nation's (Special Report on Climate: Warmer temperatures are thawing the surface layer of land that covers most of Alaska http://t.co/fewDMQgTky)...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kylie Taylor from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Out in the Great Alone

Out in the Great Alone | Polar lands | Scoop.it
The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race pushes participants to the brink on an unforgiving trek to the end of the world. And, as one writer who tracked the race by air discovers, that is exactly the point.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 25, 2013 2:06 PM

The Iditarod is as much about conquering the physical environment and harsh climates as any sporting event in the world.  This article about this famous Alaskan race also has a unique geo-visualization component to it that is worth exploring--it has a map showing where the action takes place in the article and as the reader scrolls through the article, the map changes and it highlights the progression along the trail.   


Tags: physical, weather and climatesport, Arctic, visualization.

chris tobin's comment, April 26, 2013 6:18 PM
very good story describing the long and dangerous trek. Its pretty amazing. I appreciated the video commentary and pictures of scenery and animals of the areas.