POL 303 ASH Course Tutorial (pol303.com)
0 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by cuterte
Scoop.it!

POL 303 Week 5 Final Paper (Ash)

POL 303 Week 5 Final Paper (Ash) | POL 303 ASH Course Tutorial (pol303.com) | Scoop.it

POL 303 is a online tutorial store we provides POL 303 Week 5 Final Paper

cuterte's insight:

For more course tutorials visit

www.pol303.com


 

POL 303 Week 5 Final Paper

Political Science - General Political Science

Focus of the Research Paper

In this essay you will research a case that is actively pending before the Supreme Court of the United States (not yet decided by the Court when you submit your essay at the end of Week Five). It must be a case that raises significant issues involving the interpretation of the Constitution. The thesis of your essay will be a statement of the decision, regarding these issues, which the Court should make, according to your research and analysis of the constitutional principles, Court precedents, facts of the case, and other relevant information.

Step One: Identify a Pending Case

First, you must identify a pending constitutional case that you will research. Here are some suggested search strategies:

Go to http://www.oyez.org and click on “Cases” (at the top-center) to display a list of cases before the Court during its current term. It will show the date on which the case was or is scheduled to be argued before the Court. Only consider cases that have not yet been argued or were argued very recently; so the Court is unlikely to issue its decision before you submit your essay. Click on the name of a case in this list to display the legal “questions” in each case. Look for “questions” that pose constitutional issues; and from these select a case that presents issues that you would want to research.

Go to http://www.scotusblog.com/ and click on “Merits Cases” (at the top-left side) to display a list of recent terms and select the most recent term (e.g., “October Term 2012). That displays a list of cases before the Court during its current term. It will show the date on which the case was or is scheduled to be argued before the Court. Only consider cases that have not yet been argued or were argued very recently; so the Court is unlikely to issue its decision before you submit your essay. This list also summarizes the issues in each case so that you can identify those with constitutional issues. Click on the name of a case to view more information about it, including links to various resources which may directly support your research.

Google the phrase “pending cases before the US supreme court.” Explore the links that Google offers. If you discover a constitutional case that you want to research, use Oyez or SCOTUSBlog (above) to verify that the case will still be pending when you submit your essay in Week Five.

Step Two: Instructor Approval

Next, your instructor may want you to identify your case, the date it will be (or was) argued, and the constitutional issues posed. Follow your instructor’s directions in this regard. Or, be proactive and forward your case information in Week One or Week Two.

Step Three: Begin Your Research

Now, you should be ready to research your case (remember the valuable resources that may be available in SCOTUSBlog). Start by reviewing the relevant chapter(s) in the textbook. Also, do some serious searching for scholarly articles in the Ashford Online Library.

Step Four: Begin Writing Your Paper

Your paper must clearly state your position on the constitutional issues posed in the case. Your paper should not address broader questions about the merits of the case or your personal opinions about extraneous matters; but it should focus on whether or not the state or federal rules, regulations, or laws at issue would violate a specific provision(s) of the

Constitution. You must clearly explain and logically apply a plausible interpretation of the constitutional provision(s) and justify your position using rationales from other relevant and identified Supreme Court decisions. Make clear whether you are relying on rationales used by the Court’s majority view or by a dissenting view; and if you rely on a dissent, your analysis should persuasively justify why this rationale should displace the prevailing majority rationale. Where appropriate, you may also incorporate support from scholarship in the disciplines of history, social science, biology, ethics, criminal justice studies, and public policy; but, such perspectives may be introduced only as they are directly relevant to interpreting the constitutional provision(s) at issue in the case.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cuterte
Scoop.it!

POL 303 Week 2 DQ 1 Religious Liberty (Ash)

POL 303 Week 2 DQ 1 Religious Liberty (Ash) | POL 303 ASH Course Tutorial (pol303.com) | Scoop.it

POL 303 is a online tutorial store we provides POL 303 Week 2 DQ 1 Religious Liberty

cuterte's insight:

For more course tutorials visit

www.pol303.com

 

POL 303 Week 2 DQ 1 Religious Liberty

Political Science - General Political Science

Religious Liberty. Respond to this 3-part question in your initial post:

Explain the Supreme Court's reasons, in Edwards v. Aguillard (the majority opinion by Justice Brennan), for holding that a law mandating the teaching of creationism in public schools violates the Constitution’s ban on “establishment of religion.”

Explain the rationale of Justice Scalia’s dissenting opinion.

Which rationale, the majority or dissent, is more consistent with previous Supreme Court interpretations of the Establishment Clause (see Davis, 2008)? Fully explain the historical and constitutional basis for your position.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cuterte
Scoop.it!

POL 303 Week 4 DQ 2 Cruel and Unusual Punishment (Ash)

POL 303 Week 4 DQ 2 Cruel and Unusual Punishment (Ash) | POL 303 ASH Course Tutorial (pol303.com) | Scoop.it

POL 303 is a online tutorial store we provides POL 303 Week 4 DQ 2 Cruel and Unusual Punishment

cuterte's insight:

For more course tutorials visit

www.pol303.com

 

 

POL 303 Week 4 DQ 2 Cruel and Unusual Punishment

Political Science - General Political Science

Cruel and Unusual Punishment. During the last decade, the Supreme Court has applied the 8th Amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishments against some of the harsher sentencing policies implemented by various states. Three cases dealing with juvenile offenders – Roper v. Simmons (2005), Graham v. Florida (2010), and Miller v. Alabama (2012) – illustrate this moderating trend. An underlying rationale of these decisions – “disproportionality” – contrasts with rationales guiding the Court’s earlier (pre- 2002) interpretations of the 8th Amendment (see Davis, 2008).

Respond to this 3-part question in your initial post:

Explain the rationale which seems to guide the current Supreme Court majority’s approach to defining “cruel and unusual punishment.”

Contrast this approach with an important rationale that seems to guide the pre-2002 Court.

Evaluate both of these approaches. Explain and justify your evaluation by drawing on persuasive evidence apart from your own personal opinion (e.g., research findings from sociology or criminal justice).

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cuterte
Scoop.it!

POL 303 Entire Course (Ash)

POL 303 Entire Course (Ash) | POL 303 ASH Course Tutorial (pol303.com) | Scoop.it
POL 303 is a online tutorial store we provides POL 303 Entire Course
cuterte's insight:

For more course tutorials visit

www.pol303.com


 

POL 303 Week 1 DQ 1 Judicial Review

POL 303 Week 1 DQ 2 Congress and Federalism

POL 303 Week 2 DQ 1 Religious Liberty

POL 303 Week 2 DQ 2 Freedom of Expression

POL 303 Week 2 Teaching “Intelligent Design” in the Public Schools

POL 303 Week 3 DQ 1 Equal Protection and Gender Discrimination

POL 303 Week 3 DQ 2 Constitutional Issues Related to Same-gender Marriage

POL 303 Week 3 Research Paper Draft

POL 303 Week 4 DQ 1 Suspicion-less Strip Searches

POL 303 Week 4 DQ 2 Cruel and Unusual Punishment

POL 303 Week 5 DQ 1 Eminent Domain

POL 303 Week 5 DQ 2 Right to Bear Arms

POL 303 Week 5 Final Paper

 

more...
No comment yet.