Playing to Learn
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Playing to Learn
using games and gamification in education
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Rescooped by Patricia Powers from BYOD & Blended Learning: Educational Best Practices for the 21st Century
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Education Week: Schools Open Doors to Students' Mobile Devices

Education Week: Schools Open Doors to Students' Mobile Devices | Playing to Learn | Scoop.it
Schools are showing growing interest in using student-owned cellphones and netbooks to build 1-to-1 computing programs.

Via Jodie Bramel
Patricia Powers's insight:

This is a great thought-opener on BYOD policies. As a teacher who has spent years fighting the misuse of cell phones during lessons, I found the comments on the need to train students in the propper use of technology (as opposed to throwing out the baby with the bath water) very useful.

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Jodie Bramel's curator insight, August 9, 2013 1:19 PM

Here are some excellent current examples of how districts are dealing with BYOD and some useful information on reviewing your schools technological use policy.


But recognizing the dramatically increased presence and potential of student-owned cellphones is only one step toward enacting less restrictive policies. Another, Scidmore says, is realizing that abuse of cellphones during class time—whether for cheating, accessing inappropriate material, or sending improper text messages—is a behavioral problem, not a technology problem.

Jennifer Vandeleest's comment, August 9, 2013 10:29 PM
Great article. I hadn't thought about the possibility of school provided cell phones.
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8 Research Findings Supporting the Benefits of Gamification in Education

8 Research Findings Supporting the Benefits of Gamification in Education | Playing to Learn | Scoop.it

There are myriad ways in which gamification can play a positive role in the educational setting."

Patricia Powers's insight:

Here are some examples of gamification in action.

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Why Use Games for Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language?

Why Use Games for Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language? | Playing to Learn | Scoop.it
Excerpts from articles outlining the advantages of using games in teaching English
Patricia Powers's insight:

Here you'll find several good arguments for using games in world language classes, not just as "fillers", but as a central part of instruction. The ability of games to engage students is emphasized.

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Gamification Education

Gamification Education | Playing to Learn | Scoop.it
Patricia Powers's insight:

This site does a good job at breaking down different points on gamification with subtopics like: "How to gamify" and "Differences between games and gamification". It's useful for teachers to plan integrating games/gamification into their lessons.

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Playing to learn: Panelists at Stanford discussion say using games as an educational tool provides opportunities for deeper learning

Playing to learn: Panelists at Stanford discussion say using games as an educational tool provides opportunities for deeper learning | Playing to Learn | Scoop.it
Interaction and opportunities to make choices are among the virtues of the new generation of educational games, experts say.
Patricia Powers's insight:

This is a good explanation of why games are such effective learning tools.

"If indeed humans think immeasurably better as part of a network than on their own, then games are an obvious terrain in which to set minds free and let them wander around, interacting with whatever or whomever they encounter. The system of points, badges, rewards and leaderboards featured in most massively multiplayer online (MMO) games can be replicated in an educational context, experts say, to account for people's different motivations and needs for interaction or self-expression."

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