PLASTICITIES « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world »
7.7K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
onto PLASTICITIES « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world »
Scoop.it!

Why scientists should care about art | At the Interface

Why scientists should care about art | At the Interface | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it

To be fair, these are not necessarily the attitudes of people who are disinterested in art — I’d be willing to bet that a fair few of those who walked away from the performance muttering about scientific research council funding being wasted on the arts also have memberships at cultural institutions. That said, whilst being consumers of culture, few scientists really see themselves as having much of a role in its creation. In an increasingly competitive funding landscape, does it really make sense to spend research money on an art project? Does engaging with the arts mean that they are less serious as scientists?

 

more...
No comment yet.
PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world »
TRANSDISCIPLINARY NETWORK ON PLASTICITIES    /    RÉSEAU TRANSDISCIPLINAIRE SUR LES PLASTICITÉS  
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

PLASTIR : Revue Transdisciplinaire de Plasticité Humaine, n° 45 : Fantin-Latour, Cervantès

PLASTIR : Revue Transdisciplinaire de Plasticité Humaine, n° 45 : Fantin-Latour, Cervantès | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it

Fabula, actualités et ressources pour la recherche et les études littéraires : revue, annonces de colloques et d'appels à contribution, parutions, comptes rendus critiques et débats/ Site de l'éditeur:   www.plasticites-sciences-arts.org - April 4

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

The secrets of phonosemantics (part I)

The secrets of phonosemantics (part I) | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it

The question of how things are named has been raised and discussed since the Ancient Times. In this post we explore what are the secrets hidden behind one of the most enigmatic fields within linguistics: phonosemantics.

Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe

This is the extract from the well-known nonsense poem “Jabberwocky” written by L. Carroll for his novel Alice in Wonderland.  Although most of the words don’t exist in the English language, the reader can vaguely imagine what is described in this stanza. It happens partly due to some function words that indicate the different parts of speech, and partly due to the phonetic structure of these made-up words that draw the pictures of the funny creatures in our minds. We can guess that “brillig” describes the weather condition and that “toves” must be small and slippery because they are called “slithy”, and that “mimsy” could be something flimsy and noisy. The novel Alice in Wonderland was translated into 174 languages and the translators from all over the world managed to convey the original “meaning” of the poem into their native language. Was it just pure imagination that lead the translators in their work or sounds may have a semantic meaning, just like every word has? The theory of phonosemantics or onomatopoeia suggests some answers to these questions.
The question of how things are named was first raised in Ancient Times. Some ancient philosophers thought that things are named by people’s agreement and that there is no connection between the meaning and the “sounding” of the word. Other thinkers supposed that the name of a thing can somehow imply its essence. Plato believed that people are free to choose the name for things but their choice is not random at all but dependent on the features of the thing as well as on the features of the sounds. Then in the epoch of Renaissance the idea of phonosemantics was highly criticised by J. Lock who saw no connection between sounds and ideas and described his arguments in An Essay of Human Understanding. In the 18th century, Leibniz disagreed with J. Lock in some points and admitted that the connection between the sounds and the meaning is not completely arbitrary.
In the meantime, Russian scientist and poet Mikhail Lomonosov made a hypothesis in which he stated that the repetition of the vowels i, e, yu may be used to create the effect of something tender, pleasant and soft, and the words with the repeated sounds o, u, y may be used to depict something terrifying, dark and cold. In 1836 Wilhelm von Humboldt distinguished between different relationship of sounds and meaning: onomatopoeia (the imitation of natural sounds and other sounds) and sound symbolism.  In the 20th century phonosemantics was recognized as a branch of linguistics by most linguists and its ideas gave the inspiration for tons of different researches and experiments in developing and young branches of linguistics, such as psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics, cognitive linguistics and others. In 1930 John Rupert Firth studied certain combination of sounds in different words and proposed the term “phonestheme” to refer to a sound sequence and a meaning with which it is frequently associated. For example, the English /gl/ in initial position is contained in the words which relate to something shiny, radiant, connected with light: glear, glim, glimmer, glint, glister, glitter, glamour, glory, gloss. The same relation between the combination of sounds and the meaning can be found in other languages. In German, for example, the combinations kno/knö denote something small and round: Knoblauch (garlic), Knopf (button), Knospe (bud of a plant), Knoten (knot), Knöchel (ankle), Knödel (dumpling). Margaret Magnus, after analysing the results of a test for sound-meaning correlation, came to the conclusion that phonemes may be meaning-bearing. For example, many words that contain /k/ quite often refer to containers (carton, box, crate, can, etc.), and words that contain a consonant /t/ followed by /p/ often relate to something that is off balance (topple, stoop, tipple, tipsy,etc.).
Phonosemantic studies were addressed from a different perspective in Russia. In the late 60s, Russian linguist Victor Levitsky started analysing the correlation between subjective symbolism (how the sounds affect the psyche) and objective symbolism (the connection between the sounds and the meaning of the words) and ended up obtaining results with regards to the international nature of subjective symbolism, finding out the correlation between the differential features of the phoneme and its meaning (e.g. “slow”- sonoric, fricative; “fast” – plosive, obstruent, etc.). In 1970-1980s Alexander Zhuravlev wrote the book Phonetic Meaning, which contains the results of the symbolic meaning of all the sounds of Russian language which were found using a psychometric method based on 25 distinctive-feature scales: big-small, good-bad, light-dark, etc. He proved that the word is an entity of meaning and sound, and developed the patterns which help to define the phonetic meaning of the word automatically, taking into account that the first sound of the word is 4 times more informative than the others and that the vowel under stress is two times more informative. Based on his results, an automatic system for defining the phonetic meaning of the words – Vaal project  – was developed. The Vaal project analyses the phonetic meaning of single words and even of texts, and is frequently used not only for some linguistic researches but also as a tool which helps to find the more attractive name for a company or product.

So all in all, the sounds we use to name objects are not wholly arbitrary and sometimes the phonetic shape of the word can add some value to its meaning. The raised interest towards this branch of linguistics and its important connections to literature, marketing and cultural affection prove that the phonosemantic side of language deserves to continue being studied.

Coming soon: The secrets of phonosemantics (part II), where Olga Smirnova will share the results of a phonosemantic experiment carried out with the staff of the Terminology Coordination Unit of the European Parliament.

Written by Olga Smirnova. Olga was a Study Visitor at the Terminology and Coordination Unit. She holds a BA in Linguistics from Tambov State University in Russia and she is currently doing MA in Learning and Communication in Multilingual and Multicultural Contexts at the University of Luxembourg. Native Russian speaker, speaks English and German and is currently learning French and Chinese. Her research interests include cognitive linguistic studies, multiculturalism and translation.

Sources:
Firth, John Rupert (1935) “The Use and Distribution of Certain English Sounds”, English Studies, 17: 8-18.
Levitsky, V.V. (2008) Semantic and Phonetic Links in the Indo-European Lexicon, Chernovtsi: Ruta.
Magnus, Margaret (1998) The Gods of the Word: Archetypes in the Consonants. Kirksville: Truman State University Press.
Zhuravlev, A.P. (1974) Phonetic Meaning. Leningrad: Leningrad University Press.
Carroll, Lewis (1962) Alice in Wonderland, Through the Looking Glass. England: Puffin Books
Voronin S.V. (1990) Phonosemantic ideas in foreign linguistic studies. Leningrad: Leningrad University Press
Science and life (1974) “Hot” and “cold” words. Available at: https://www.nkj.ru/archive/articles/23993/ (Accessed 29 March, 2017)


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

Hannah Arendt on Human Nature vs. Culture, What Equality Really Means, and How Our Language Confers Reality Upon Our Experience

Hannah Arendt on Human Nature vs. Culture, What Equality Really Means, and How Our Language Confers Reality Upon Our Experience | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
"An experience makes its appearance only when it is being said. And unless it is said it is, so to speak, non-existent."
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Darwin Was a Slacker and You Should Be Too - Issue 46: Balance - Nautilus

Darwin Was a Slacker and You Should Be Too - Issue 46: Balance - Nautilus | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
When you examine the lives of history’s most creative figures, you are immediately confronted with a paradox: They organize their lives around their work, but not their days.

Figures as different as Charles Dickens, Henri Poincaré, and Ingmar Bergman, working in disparate fields in different times, all shared a passion for their work, a terrific ambition to succeed, and an almost superhuman capacity to focus. Yet when you look closely at their daily lives, they only spent a few hours a day doing what we would recognize as their most important work. The rest of the time, they were hiking mountains, taking naps, going on walks with friends, or just sitting and thinking. Their creativity and productivity, in other words, were not the result of endless hours of toil. Their towering creative achievements result from modest “working” hours.

How did they manage to be so accomplished? Can a generation raised to believe that 80-hour workweeks are necessary for success learn something from the lives of the people who laid the foundations of chaos theory and topology or wrote Great Expectations?

Via Wildcat2030
more...
prgnewshawaii's curator insight, April 1, 11:22 AM

A different way to look at the work ethic.  Perhaps an 80 hour work week and overtime aren't the keys to success. It's basically a question of intensity when you are working. "Off time" is necessary to maintain a balance between work and other pursuits.

Russell Roberts

Hawaii Intelligence Digest

R's curator insight, April 6, 1:39 PM
Humans are not one-dimensional. Take heed to listen to all of your needs - physical, emotional and intellectual.
pursuitsdrizzly's comment, April 8, 12:53 AM
Like it
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

Fake news and neurobabble: how do we critically assess what we read?

Fake news and neurobabble: how do we critically assess what we read? | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
With unprecedented access to news and knowledge, how do we make judgements about what we read? Neuroscience news is a case in point
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

« Limites naturelles » : photographies et sculptures

« Limites naturelles » : photographies et sculptures | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
L’expo « Limites naturelles » à la galerie Ségolène Brossette : photographies et sculptures soulignent la fragilité de l’homme et de la nature.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

WATCH TODAY: NASA TV to Live Stream & Preview ‘Grand Finale’ of Cassini Saturn Mission

WATCH TODAY: NASA TV to Live Stream & Preview ‘Grand Finale’ of Cassini Saturn Mission | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
NASA will hold a news conference at 3 p.m. EDT Tuesday, April 4, at the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, to preview the beginning of Cassini's final mission segment, known as the Grand Finale, which begin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Positive Psychology
Scoop.it!

The Busier You Are, the More You Need Quiet Time

The Busier You Are, the More You Need Quiet Time | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
It’s essential for strategic thinking.

Via Kasia Hein-Peters
more...
I Am A Science Lady's curator insight, March 23, 6:31 PM
This was alluded to at a Health & Safety conference I attended this week; in that case they were talking about managing stress by building resilience and making time to rest and recover.
Dawn Hoenie's curator insight, March 31, 9:14 AM
It’s essential for strategic thinking.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Poezibao
Scoop.it!

(agenda), 30 mars, Paris, Lancement de la revue Babel heureuse

(agenda), 30 mars, Paris, Lancement de la revue Babel heureuse | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it

 

Le 30 mars à 18h30, soirée organisée par Ent'revues

 Présentation du numéro 1 de Babel heureuse

avec François Rannou son directeur, Gwen Catala son éditeur et la participation de Laure Gauthier, Maria Raluca Hanea et Adèle Nègre.

à Ent'revues, 4 avenue Marceau - 75008 Paris (métro Alma-Marceau-bus 72-63)

entrée libre - réservation: info@entrevues.org


Via Florence Trocmé
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from KINSHIP COMMUNITY NETWORK: THE KINSHIP PROJECT
Scoop.it!

The Threat of Tyranny - Written by Michael Meade

The Threat of Tyranny - Written by Michael Meade | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
An ePlease click on picture for the full article

Via Michael Goodman
more...
Michael Goodman's curator insight, August 10, 2016 11:34 PM
An excellent piece written on our current political piece in this election year. Gives us an opportunity to view thru the lens of Pattern, Mythology and Archetype. You gotta love the wisdom of Michael Meade....well at least that's the view from my window. 
Bonnie Bright's curator insight, January 23, 3:13 AM
While the meaning of the word democracy remains a subject of much controversy, as does the practice of it; there is little doubt that democracy stands in opposition to all forms of tyranny. Fear not only causes people to abandon core principles; but it is said to be the parent of cruelty. Long before tyranny comes to rule, there is an escalation of both fear and cruelty. All cruelty comes from weakness and when people become overly fearful they not only support a would be “strong man,” but also become willing to overlook systematic cruelty....
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

The inventor of the web, Tim Berners-Lee, outlines its three biggest threats

The inventor of the web, Tim Berners-Lee, outlines its three biggest threats | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it

The World Wide Web turned 28 today. But rather than celebrate, its inventor, Tim Berners-Lee, used the occasion to lay out what he sees as its greatest challenges. Specifically, Berners-Lee points to three threats: the loss of control of personal data, the spread of misinformation, and lack of transparency in political advertising.


Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
more...
THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, March 12, 3:25 PM

"Watching everyone, all the time, is simply going too far."

Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

Language and Permaculture, Part 1: Why we need to focus on Terminology to take Permaculture to the next level. - The Permaculture Research Institute

Language and Permaculture, Part 1: Why we need to focus on Terminology to take Permaculture to the next level. - The Permaculture Research Institute | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
One of the most universally applicable attractions of permaculture is that it is a practical set of design tools, based on directly observable effects and which can be used to create physical solutions to problems in the world. Indeed, co-conceptualiser of permaculture Bill Mollison famously pointed out that one of the reasons permaculture is so useful is that it involves actually applying what you are saying to what you are …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

Sciences, Philosophie, Histoire – UMR 7219, laboratoire SPHERE - L’intrication psychophysique 

Sciences, Philosophie, Histoire – UMR 7219, laboratoire SPHERE - L’intrication psychophysique  | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
Un beau programme de conférences proposé par P. Uzan et S. Roux
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

SUR L'EXPO Galerie le 1040

SUR L'EXPO Galerie le 1040 | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it

A TRANSDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVE ON EMOTIONS - http://www.marianathieriotloisel.com/ ; Naissance à Montréal d'un collectif d'artistes au féminin… inspiré par le soul art et la sortie du livre " De Cendres et d'Or" (http://editions-amalthee.com/article.php?sid=3939) de l'artiste et philosophe Mar Thieriot. Un très bon cru ! 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Philosophie en France
Scoop.it!

La socialité contemporaine à l’ère de l’anthropocène | IRI

La socialité contemporaine à l’ère de l’anthropocène | IRI | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
26 avril à l'ICP, 19 rue d’Assas, Paris 6ème 27 avril à l'IRI, Salle Triangle, piazza Beaubourg, Paris 4ème Après un travail sur
Via dm
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Philosophie en France
Scoop.it!

Première personne & Conscience de soi - Centre Atlantique de Philosophie

Première personne & Conscience de soi - Centre Atlantique de Philosophie | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
« Self-Consciousness & the First Person » Journée d’étude organisée par Bruno Gnassounou et Cyrille Michon, dans le cadre du séminaire « La (...)
Via dm
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Poezibao
Scoop.it!

(documents) 20 Rare Photographs of Allen Ginsberg

(documents) 20 Rare Photographs of Allen Ginsberg | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
Twenty years ago today, Allen Ginsberg—author of Howl, Beat poet, revolutionary free mind, Buddhist, teacher, activist—died at the age of 70. In addition to

Via Florence Trocmé
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

S. Riva, Dominique Fourcade. Chorégraphies poétiques

S. Riva, Dominique Fourcade. Chorégraphies poétiques | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
Fabula, actualités et ressources pour la recherche et les études littéraires : revue, annonces de colloques et d'appels à contribution, parutions, comptes rendus critiques et débats
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

Why the Father of Modern Neuroscience Was Obsessed with Fiction

Why the Father of Modern Neuroscience Was Obsessed with Fiction | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
Santiago Ramón y Cajal, “the father of modern neuroscience,” visualized the brain by imagining “neurons as protagonists in an intense cerebral drama.”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Poezibao
Scoop.it!

(Radio) Liliane Giraudon et Arno Gisinger

(Radio) Liliane Giraudon et Arno Gisinger | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
Deux invités et des fantômes. Ceux de la poétesse Liliane Giraudon, qui rameute dans L'amour est plus froid que le lac une foule de spectres, comme on établirait le générique d'un film. Ceux du plasticien Arno Gisinger qui discute la nature fantomatique de la photographie face à l'histoi[...]

Emission Poésie et ainsi de suite du 31/03/2017


Via Florence Trocmé
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Plants & Evolution
Scoop.it!

Origins and evolution of stomatal development

The fossil record suggests stomata-like pores were present on the surfaces of land plants over 400 million years ago. Whether stomata arose once or whether they arose independently across newly evolving land plant lineages has long been a matter of debate. 27 In Arabidopsis, a genetic toolbox has been identified which tightly controls stomatal development and patterning. This includes the bHLH transcription factors SPEECHLESS, MUTE, FAMA and ICE/SCREAMs (SCRMs) which promote stomatal formation. These factors are regulated via a signalling cascade which includes mobile EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) peptides to enforce stomatal spacing. Mosses and hornworts, the most ancient extant lineages to possess stomata, possess orthologues of these Arabidopsis stomatal toolbox genes and manipulation in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens has shown that the bHLH and EPF components are also required for moss stomatal development and patterning. This supports an ancient and tightly conserved genetic origin of stomata. Here, we review recent discoveries and, by interrogating newly available plant genomes, we advance the story of stomatal development and patterning 38 across land plant evolution. Furthermore, we identify potential orthologues of the key toolbox genes in a hornwort, further supporting a single ancient genetic origin of stomata in the ancestor to all stomatous land plants.

Via Pierre-Marc Delaux
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts) from Poezibao
Scoop.it!

Le grand poète Derek Walcott n'est plus.. (prix Nobel 1992)

Le grand poète Derek Walcott n'est plus.. (prix Nobel 1992) | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
Derek Walcott is dead. Relatives and sources  close to the Saint Lucian poet and playwright who had been suffering with health issues have confirmed that he passed away in the early hours of Friday morning. Walcott received the 1992 Nobel Prize … Continue reading →

Via Florence Trocmé
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
Scoop.it!

Mésologiques /Sciences des milieux humains 

Mésologiques /Sciences des milieux humains  | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it

Site de recherche regroupant les travaux autour de la mésologie (science des milieux humains) d'Augustin Berque. Fondé en 2010 par Yoann Moreau. 

De très nombreux articles ou CR d'interventions au séminaire de mésologie, tous plus passionnants les uns que les autres". Nous vous engageons à découvrir l'empreinte réelle du milieu sur l'humanité… MWD

more...
No comment yet.