Plantsheal
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Plantsheal
A collection of practical herbal lore for health & healing
Curated by Elle D'Coda
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KarmaTube: Food People Power

KarmaTube: Food People Power | Plantsheal | Scoop.it

“Food People Power For many years, people living in West Oakland had accepted eating unhealthy food as a way of life. That is, until a small group of people decided to change their community through Mandela MarketPlace, a non-profit that partners with local residents and rural, minority farmers to bring fresh agricultural produce to their local corner stores. Mandela MarketPlace now represents the difference that youth can make by challenging prevailing paradigms - you CAN select what you put in your body.”

 

watch video: http://bit.ly/LeKMmG


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Rosemary,Basil and Thyme at the Blue Mountain – a comparison

Rosemary,Basil and Thyme at the Blue Mountain – a comparison | Plantsheal | Scoop.it

This is a post from my herbal medicine blog on similarities and differences between rosemary, basil and thyme.

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Food We Eat Might Control Our Genes: Scientific American

Food We Eat Might Control Our Genes: Scientific American | Plantsheal | Scoop.it

“You are what you eat.” The old adage has for decades weighed on the minds of consumers who fret over responsible food choices. Yet what if it was literally true? What if material from our food actually made its way into the innermost control centers of our cells, taking charge of fundamental gene expression?

That is in fact what happens, according to a recent study of plant-animal micro­RNA transfer led by Chen-Yu Zhang of Nanjing University in China. MicroRNAs are short sequences of nucleotides—the building blocks of genetic material. Although microRNAs do not code for proteins, they prevent specific genes from giving rise to the proteins they encode. Blood samples from 21 volunteers were tested for the presence of microRNAs from crop plants, such as rice, wheat, potatoes and cabbage.

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