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Plant Science
Useful information on Plant Science in the UK and further a field
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The First Plant Interactome | The Scientist

The First Plant Interactome | The Scientist | Plant Science | Scoop.it
For the first time, a systematic protein interaction map—or interactome—has been constructed for a plant. In a pair of papers published online today (July 28) in Science, researchers from the Arabidopsis Interactome Mapping Consortium (AIMC) present their data from an extensive effort to map the pairwise interactions of over 2,700 proteins expressed within the cells of Arabidopsis thaliana, and show that pathogens target the most active proteins during infection.The map shows that “there are few proteins that are highly connected,” said Christian Landry, an assistant professor of Biology at Laval University, who did not participate in the research. “This kind of structure gives robustness to the network because if you target proteins randomly, you are more likely to hit peripheral proteins” and not significantly disrupt cell function.
The effort also serves to “put proteins that we don’t know about into a molecular context,” added Pascal Braun, chair of AIMC and an author on both papers. While there has been much attention paid to sequencing projects, the genome tells researchers little about the functions of proteins that actually drive cellular processes, he said. “We need to know what the proteins do and how they interact. This is the first time we have done this at a systematic level for any plant.
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Talking Plants: International Botanical Congress in Melbourne all a twitter

Talking Plants: International Botanical Congress in Melbourne all a twitter | Plant Science | Scoop.it
#IBC18 Blogged by conference chair Tim Entwisle
Half way through the International Botanical Congress in Melbourne it's time to draw breath. The pace has been cracking, particularly with hands on Twitter, eyes on the speaker and mind on running the Congress.
Some background first. The International Botanical Congress is held every six years and attracts botanists from around the world to discuss the latest developments in plant science. The previous congress was held in Vienna, Austria, in 2005, and the next will be held in China in 2017.
Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Science: Independently Evolved Virulence Effectors Converge onto Hubs in a Plant Immune System Network

Science: Independently Evolved Virulence Effectors Converge onto Hubs in a Plant Immune System Network | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Plants generate effective responses to infection by recognizing both conserved and variable pathogen-encoded molecules. Pathogens deploy virulence effector proteins into host cells, where they interact physically with host proteins to modulate defense. We generated an interaction network of plant-pathogen effectors from two pathogens spanning the eukaryote-eubacteria divergence, three classes of Arabidopsis immune system proteins, and ~8000 other Arabidopsis proteins. We noted convergence of effectors onto highly interconnected host proteins and indirect, rather than direct, connections between effectors and plant immune receptors. We demonstrated plant immune system functions for 15 of 17 tested host proteins that interact with effectors from both pathogens. Thus, pathogens from different kingdoms deploy independently evolved virulence proteins that interact with a limited set of highly connected cellular hubs to facilitate their diverse life-cycle strategies.
Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Tequila for your fuel tank

Tequila for your fuel tank | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Researchers in the UK show that Agave - a plant used to make tequila and fibres for rope - is a handy alternative feedstock to corn or sugarcane in the production of bioethanol fuel. Bioethanol is a good clean fuel candidate as it only forms carbon dioxide and water during combustion and can be easily blended with crude oil to produce other fuels. However, the sustainability of large-scale biofuel production has recently been called into question because of mounting concerns over the impact on land and water resources.
Now a team led by David King from the Low Carbon Mobility Centre at the University of Oxford has studied the viability of using Agave as an alternative feedstock because it can be grown in an arid environment.
In the US, bioethanol is produced from corn, which is very water and fertiliser intensive and requires a significant amount of land. The result is a trade-off between feedstocks for the food markets and feedstocks for bioethanol production. In Brazil, bioethanol is produced using sugarcane. But again, land that could be used to grow food is needed to grow this and the question is: which is more important, food or fuel?
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