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Plant Science
Useful information on Plant Science in the UK and further a field
Curated by Ruth Bastow
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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New content in open access journal The Arabidopsis Book! Including Shade Avoidance, Female Gametophyte and more

New content in open access journal The Arabidopsis Book! Including Shade Avoidance, Female Gametophyte and more | Plant Science | Scoop.it

New Content includes:

 

Photomorphogenesis (update)

Carotenoid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis: a colorful pathway

Shade Avoidance

 

The Female Gametophyte

 

Salicylic Acid Biosynthesis and Metabolism

 

Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis

 

The Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Arabidopsis

 

Plant ABC Transporters

 

Brassinosteroids (update)

 

Cytochromes P450 (major update)

 

Small Post-Translationally Modified Peptide Signals in Arabidopsis

 

The Function of the CLE Peptide in Plant Development and Symbiosis

 

Phytochrome Signaling Mechanisms(update)


Via Mary Williams
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Looking to the past for future solutions - UK Plant Science

Looking to the past for future solutions - UK Plant Science | Plant Science | Scoop.it
A paper published this month in New Phytologist summarises the development of the UK Plant Science Federation (UKPSF) and explains its importance.
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from AnnBot
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Farm-fresh infringement: Can you violate a patent by planting some seeds?

Farm-fresh infringement: Can you violate a patent by planting some seeds? | Plant Science | Scoop.it
One farmer argues that when Monsanto sells a seed, farmers are free to do as they please with it—and its descendants. Monsanto claims patent infringement. The Supreme Court may decide.

Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from John Innes Centre on the web
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Why spring is blooming marvellous (and climate change makes it earlier) | News from the John Innes Centre

Why spring is blooming marvellous (and climate change makes it earlier) | News from the John Innes Centre | Plant Science | Scoop.it

With buds bursting early, only for a mild winter to turn Arctic and wipe them out, we are witnessing how warm weather can trigger flowering, even out of season, and how important it is for plants to blossom at the right time of year.

BBSRC-funded scientists have unpicked why temperature has such a powerful affect on how plants flower. In research published in the journal Nature, scientists from the John Innes Centre on the Norwich Research Park have identified the switch that accelerates flowering time in response to temperature.


Via John Innes Centre
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101 ways to try to grow Arabidopsis

101 ways to try to grow Arabidopsis | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Very thorough summary of best practices for growing Arabidopsis. What size pots? What temperature? How much light? With photos and references. Good resource for student researchers!

 

Don't forget to share this one with them too:

The top 10 ways to kill Arabidopsis, by Sean May at NASC.

(http://arabidopsis.info/information/kill.pdf)


Via Mary Williams, Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Misuse Of A Vietnam Era Tragedy « Biofortified - Excellent article and discussion from BIOfortified

Misuse Of A Vietnam Era Tragedy « Biofortified - Excellent article and discussion from BIOfortified | Plant Science | Scoop.it

We are big fans of the BIO fortified blog (and their GENERA database). You've probably seen the term "Agent Orange Corn" kicked around - what's that all about? Steve Savage explains, and explains again in the comments section. Good reading, and fascinating issues, both scientific and social.

 Opening line:

Mark Twain once said, “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.”


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Arabidopsis
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New technologies for 21st century plant science (Plant Cell)

New technologies for 21st century plant science (Plant Cell) | Plant Science | Scoop.it

lants are one of the most fascinating and important groups of organisms living on Earth. They serve as the conduit of energy into the biosphere, provide food, and shape our environment. If we want to make headway in understanding how these essential organisms function and build the foundation for a more sustainable future, then we need to apply the most advanced technologies available to the study of plant life. In 2009, a committee of the National Academy highlighted the “understanding of plant growth” as one of the big challenges for society and part of a new era which they termed “new biology.” The aim of this article is to identify how new technologies can and will transform plant science to address the challenges of new biology. We assess where we stand today regarding current technologies, with an emphasis on molecular and imaging technologies, and we try to address questions about where we may go in the future and whether we can get an idea of what is at and beyond the horizon.


Via GMI Vienna
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from WHEAT
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UK-South Africa: Joining forces to defeat wheat disease - Feature - BBSRC

"Rusts never sleep" warned the Nobel Prize winner Norman Borlaug, referring to the crop-destroying fungi that rank among humankind's most formidable agricultural foes.

A prescient warning it remains – Borlaug was father of the 1940s-70s 'green revolution' that saved millions from starvation by developing new varieties of wheat that were resistant to these rust diseases. While always present, the spectre of fungal attack has returned to haunt cereal growers the world over in the form of rusts that can destroy wheat varieties that were until very recently still immune to the major rust pathogens.


Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from AnnBot
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Frozen plants spring back to life

Frozen plants spring back to life | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Scientists in Russia have grown plants from fruit stored away in permafrost by squirrels over 30,000 years ago. The fruit was found in the banks of the Kolyma River in Siberia, a top site for people looking for mammoth bones. The Institute of Cell Biophysics team raised plants of Silene stenophylla - of the campion family - from the fruit.


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Job promoting plant science in the UK

UK Plant Sciences Federation Executive Officer
Salary: £31,000 - £40,000
The Society of Biology has a number of Special Interest Groups that provide expertise on specific topics within the Biosciences. The UK Plant Sciences Federation (UKPSF) was established as a Special Interest Group in November 2011. It aims to bring together the plant science community in the UK and create a coordinated approach to research, industry, funding and education in this vital sector of the biosciences. The Society of Biology has a vacancy for a full-time member of staff who will manage the UKPSF and its outputs. This position is jointly funded by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation and the Society for Experimental Biology. For more information on the UK Plant Sciences Federation, please visit: http://plantsci.org.uk/


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Arabidopsis
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Drought, salt, and temperature stress-induced metabolic rearrangements and regulatory networks (J Exp Bot)

Drought, salt, and temperature stress-induced metabolic rearrangements and regulatory networks (J Exp Bot) | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Plants regularly face adverse growth conditions, such as drought, salinity, chilling, freezing, and high temperatures. These stresses can delay growth and development, reduce productivity, and, in extreme cases, cause plant death. Plant stress responses are dynamic and involve complex cross-talk between different regulatory levels, including adjustment of metabolism and gene expression for physiological and morphological adaptation. In this review, information about metabolic regulation in response to drought, extreme temperature, and salinity stress is summarized and the signalling events involved in mediating stress-induced metabolic changes are presented.


Via GMI Vienna
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Don't leave plants out of the picture!

Don't leave plants out of the picture! | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Hand out for FoPD - two pages, laminated back to back. Files available upon request!


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Agricultural Biodiversity
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Kew MSBP-BGCI Fieldwork Fund

Kew MSBP-BGCI Fieldwork Fund | Plant Science | Scoop.it
The Millennium Seed Bank Partnership-Botanic Gardens Conservation International Fieldwork Fund aims to tackle the continuing loss of plant species by enabling organisations to undertake fieldwork resulting in high quality seed collections.

Via Luigi Guarino
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from AnnBot
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Why taxonomy is important for biodiversity-based science

Why taxonomy is important for biodiversity-based science | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Taxonomy usually refers to the theory and practice of describing, naming and classifying living things. Such work is essential for the fundamental understanding of biodiversity and its conservation. Yet the science behind delimiting the natural world into “species” is often neglected, misunderstood or even derided in some quarters.

The paper give the example of rattans of Africa, leading to the publication of a taxonomic monograph of these climbing palms. Taxonomic work of this kind is not purely an academic exercise. It is an essential basis for the conservation, development and management of the resource itself. It is important that the differences between species are clearly understood so that we know which species are of commercial importance and how they can be distinguished from other species that are not utilised and why. This knowledge is essential in order to undertake meaningful inventories of commercially important species and to be able to assess the potential of each species for cultivation and sustainable management. A structured taxonomic framework also ensures that any experimental or development work undertaken is replicable.


Via Luigi Guarino, Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from AnnBot
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Biotech and Organic Farming: Coexisting Peacefully

Biotech and Organic Farming: Coexisting Peacefully | Plant Science | Scoop.it
A plant pathologist and an organic farmer co-author a book about how agricultural biotechnology and organic farming can coexist to produce abundant food and enhance the ecologic sustainability of farms.

Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Pick of the day - genetics of flower form reveals the origins of Van Gogh's odd sunflowers

Pick of the day - genetics of flower form reveals the origins of Van Gogh's odd sunflowers | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Super way to introduce developmental genetics! Also check out the Nature News summary: 

http://www.nature.com/news/gene-behind-van-gogh-s-sunflowers-pinpointed-1.10364


Via Mary Williams
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New Phytologist Tansley Medal

New Phytologist Tansley Medal | Plant Science | Scoop.it

The New Phytologist Tansley Medal is awarded annually in recognition of an outstanding contribution to research in plant science by an individual in the early stages of their career. The winner will receive a prize of £2000 (GBP) and will author a Minireview that will be published in New Phytologist, accompanied by a comment from the Editor-in-Chief and Tansley reviews Editor.

Applications for 2012 should be received by 15 April.


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Arabidopsis
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A genome-wide association study identifies variants underlying the Arabidopsis thaliana shade avoidance response (PLoS Genetics)

A genome-wide association study identifies variants underlying the Arabidopsis thaliana shade avoidance response (PLoS Genetics) | Plant Science | Scoop.it

The goal of this work was to identify genetic variants underlying a well-characterized environmental response, the elongation of Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls (seedling stems) in response to shade, otherwise known as shade avoidance. We performed a genome-wide association study with four phenotypes: absolute hypocotyl height of plants grown in both simulated sun and shade and two measures of how height responded to shade. With this study, we confirmed previous findings that variants in two photoreceptors were associated with hypocotyl height variation. We also found associations with genetic variants in previously-identified shade avoidance genes, as well as with variants in genes not typically considered part of the shade avoidance pathway. By examining patterns of which of the four phenotypes were associated with each gene, we were then able to discriminate between genetic variants that have a general role in hypocotyl height variation and variants that are specifically involved in the shade avoidance response. We also found that shade avoidance was not broadly associated with geography, suggesting that variation in this trait may be due to local differences in light quality.


Via GMI Vienna
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Low-cost system for imaging GFP in Arabidopsis - boon for teaching!

"An epifluorescent attachment improves whole-plant digital photography of Arabidopsis thaliana expressing red-shifted green fluorescent protein"

Somebody built a cheaper mousetrap!


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Cell Biology
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Faces of Plant Cell Biology: Dr Geraint Parry | Plantcellbiology.com

Faces of Plant Cell Biology: Dr Geraint Parry | Plantcellbiology.com | Plant Science | Scoop.it
I met Geraint Parry on Twitter, where he tweets under @LiverpoolPlants about his research. Fortunately, my colleagues were able to confirm that he indeed ...

Via Anne Osterrieder
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from AnnBot
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Carolus Linnaeus’s Floral Clocks

Carolus Linnaeus’s Floral Clocks | Plant Science | Scoop.it

It was Carolus Linnaeus back in the 18th century who, fond of personifying plants (mostly in regard to sex) named this phenomenon “sleep” in plants. Soon, he switched his focus from movements of leaves to the daily opening and closing of flowers and performed a broad study of the times of day when each flower species opened and closed.


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Genes may travel from plant to plant to fuel evolution

Genes may travel from plant to plant to fuel evolution | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Evolutionary biologists at the University of Sheffield and Brown University have documented for the first time that plants pass genes from plant to plant to fuel their evolutionary development.

The evolution of plants and animals generally has been thought to occur through the passing of genes from parent to offspring and genetic modifications that happen along the way. However, the new research has documented another avenue, through the passing of genes from plant to plant between species with only a distant ancestral kinship.

How this happened is unclear but the researchers show that not only did a grouping of grasses pass on enzymes key to photosynthesis multiple times over millions of years, but that some of the genes that were transferred became integral cogs to the plants' photosynthetic machinery. This is a critical distinguishing feature in C4 plants, which dominate in hot, tropical climes and now make up 20 per cent of the earth´s vegetational covering.

Dr Colin Osborne, an evolutionary biologist from the University of Sheffield´s Department of Animal and Plant Sciences and senior author on the paper, said: "We've long understood how evolutionary adaptations are passed from parents to offspring. Now we´ve discovered in plants that they can be passed between distant cousins without direct contact between the species."

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Plants Use Body Clocks to Prepare for Battle

Plants Use Body Clocks to Prepare for Battle | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Biologists at Rice University have discovered that while plants might look fairly inactive in the day, they are surreptitiously preparing for battle with hungry insects.


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Don't leave plant out of the (Rousseau) picture

Don't leave plant out of the (Rousseau) picture | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Here's the other version - better plants in this one! There's a snake in the trees, too!


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plants and Microbes
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Resource: Release of a draft genome sequence for Nicotiana benthamiana

Resource: Release of a draft genome sequence for Nicotiana benthamiana | Plant Science | Scoop.it

BTI scientists have released a draft sequence of the Nicotiana benthamiana genome which is accessible through the SGN BLAST tool and can be downloaded by ftp (see: http://solgenomics.net/).

 

N. benthamiana is a widely used model for plant-microbe biology and other research applications. It is particularly useful because it is related to tomato and potato and is amenable to virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) which facilitates the efficient functional study of plant genes.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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