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Plant Science
Useful information on Plant Science in the UK and further a field
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Food issues
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Agent Orange chemical in GM war on resistant weeds

Agent Orange chemical in GM war on resistant weeds | Plant Science | Scoop.it
A US pharmaceutical company is set to introduce a controversial new genetically modified corn to help farmers fight resistant weeds.

Via Cathryn Wellner
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from GARNet Plant Science Community
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Background to GM policy discussions from NIAB Innovation FarmWeeding the Gems

Background to GM policy discussions from NIAB Innovation FarmWeeding the Gems | Plant Science | Scoop.it
A discussion of the contradictory issues associated with GM food products, introducing the idea of a public good programme for GM.

Via GARNet
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Global Food Security
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Organic food is 'not healthier' - Telegraph

Organic food is 'not healthier' - Telegraph | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Organic food is no better for you than than traditionally grown food but it may taste better, researchers have said.

Via Rob Dawson
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from BBSRC News Coverage
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'Flip-flop' switch discovered behind key cellular process

'Flip-flop' switch discovered behind key cellular process | Plant Science | Scoop.it

For organisms to grow and develop, they must produce tissues with distinct functions, each one made up of similar cells.

 

Through an experimental-modelling cycle, researchers have unravelled how stem cells in the Arabidopsis root regulate asymmetric cell divisions that give rise to two new cell identities at the correct position.


Via Rob Dawson
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Botany Roundup: Worthy Plant News
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Wild rice gene gives yield boost

Wild rice gene gives yield boost | Plant Science | Scoop.it
A gene from wild Indian rice plants can significantly raise the yield of common varieties in nutrient-poor soils by boosting root growth.

Via Marybeth Shea
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Jeremy Cherfas's comment, August 23, 2012 6:43 AM
I wonder what happens when the increased root growth of one plant intersects with the increased root growth of its neighbours. In a P-depleted soil, why doesn't each plant rob P from its neighbours?
Marybeth Shea's comment, August 23, 2012 6:49 AM
Not sure. However, this research supports claims that wild crop relatives hold an inventory of genes, the value of which is huge. How do we protect more effectively this rich resource?
Jeremy Cherfas's comment, August 23, 2012 6:57 AM
Protecting the genetic diversity of wild relatives is indeed a challenge, one that is being addressed in a variety of ways.
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Wild pollinators support farm productivity and stabilize yield

Wild pollinators support farm productivity and stabilize yield | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Most people are not aware of the fact that 84% of the European crops are partially or entirely dependent on insect pollination.
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Pine trees one of biggest contributors to air pollution: Pine gases chemically transformed by free radicals

Pine trees one of biggest contributors to air pollution: Pine gases chemically transformed by free radicals | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Pine trees are one of the biggest contributors to air pollution. They give off gases that react with airborne chemicals creating tiny, invisible particles that muddy the air.
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Diversity keeps grasslands resilient to drought, climate change

Diversity keeps grasslands resilient to drought, climate change | Plant Science | Scoop.it

For much of the year drought has been plaguing American grasslands. But a recent study found that grasses do not appear to be losing the turf war against climate when it comes to surviving with little precipitation.

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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from GARNet Plant Science Community
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Programmed Cell Death in action « « Weeding the GemsWeeding the Gems

Programmed Cell Death in action « « Weeding the GemsWeeding the Gems | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Wertman et al., from Dalhousie University, used the predictable nature of PCD in lace plants to monitor the process using light, confocal and standing electron microscopy.

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Ethylene of no effect: Why peppers do not mature after picking

Ethylene of no effect: Why peppers do not mature after picking | Plant Science | Scoop.it
The plant hormone ethylene lets green tomatoes ripen even after the harvest, whereas the closely related chili peppers show no such effect.
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Major investment to persuade bacteria to help cereals self-fertilise
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Major investment to persuade bacteria to help cereals self-fertilise | News from the John Innes Centre

Major investment to persuade bacteria to help cereals self-fertilise | News from the John Innes Centre | Plant Science | Scoop.it

The John Innes Centre will lead a $9.8m research project to investigate whether it is possible to initiate a symbiosis between cereal crops and bacteria. The symbiosis could help cereals access nitrogen from the air to improve yields.

The five-year research project, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, could have most immediate benefit for subsistence farmers.


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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from John Innes Centre on the web
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Fascination of Plants Day

Fascination of Plants Day | Plant Science | Scoop.it
The first International Fascination of Plants Day was celebrated at JIC with over 550 children from 23 Norfolk schools.

Via John Innes Centre
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from AnnBot
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Drug-making plant blooms

Drug-making plant blooms | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Approval of a ‘biologic’ manufactured in plant cells may pave the way for similar products.

Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Nature comment: Plant perennials to save Africa's soils

Nature comment: Plant perennials to save Africa's soils | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Integrating perennials with food crops could restore soil health and increase staple yields. Examples include nitrogen-fixing trees, co-cropping with legumes and other strategies. 

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v489/n7416/full/489359a.html

 

"Sub-Saharan Africa's population is expected to reach 1.5–2 billion by 2050. Already the population is ballooning; in many areas, the risk of drought and flood is increasing; most soils are poor; and richer nations are buying up Africa's arable land for their own food or fuel security. African farmers have demonstrated the promise of perenniation. It is time to scale up its use and put it firmly on the research-and-development map."


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Global Food Security
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Plants need a 'new deal' to stem their decline, warns Kew director

Plants need a 'new deal' to stem their decline, warns Kew director | Plant Science | Scoop.it

The economic and environmental benefits of plants must not be overlooked, says the outgoing director of Kew Gardens.


Via Rob Dawson
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Global Food Security
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Can science prevent the great global food crisis? - Telegraph

Can science prevent the great global food crisis? - Telegraph | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Previous agricultural revolutions have saved us from starvation – and we need another one now, says Michael Hanlon.


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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Plant Cell: Small Signaling Peptides in Arabidopsis Development: How Cells Communicate Over a Short Distance

Plant Cell: Small Signaling Peptides in Arabidopsis Development: How Cells Communicate Over a Short Distance | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Here's a great new review that discusses small secreted peptides and their roles in development, including roles in patterning the meristems and guard cells, and pollen development. The review also points to the major gaps that remain in our knowlege of these small secreted signals.


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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from BBSRC News Coverage
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Early GM potato trial results show real promise | News | Farmers Guardian

Early GM potato trial results show real promise | News | Farmers Guardian | Plant Science | Scoop.it
EARLY results from a three-year trial to genetically modify blight-resistant potatoes have been hailed a success by scientists.

Via Rob Dawson
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Costs of reproduction in a gynodioecious species - AoB Blog

Costs of reproduction in a gynodioecious species - AoB Blog | Plant Science | Scoop.it

In gynodioecious species hermaphroditic plants coexist with female plants. Toivonen and Mutikainen find that experimentally increased reproductive output leads to differential costs of reproduction in the gynodioecious Geranium sylvaticum (Geraniaceae). In hermaphrodites the costs are expressed as decreased flowering, and in females as decreased seed production; overall, female plants seem to be more sensitive to the cost of reproduction than hermaphrodites. The differential costs of reproduction may contribute to annual variation in the relative seed fitness of female plants in this gynodioecious species, and consequently they might also contribute to the maintenance of the gynodioecious breeding system.

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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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"It's like adding an app to an iPhone" - blight resistant potatoes

"It's like adding an app to an iPhone" - blight resistant potatoes | Plant Science | Scoop.it

The wet wet summer in the UK means that it's been a bad yar for late blight, but the better to demonstrate the protection conferred by introduced disease resistance genes. Check it out...


Via Mary Williams
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Planting the seeds of defense: Stress triggers widespread epigenetic changes that aid in disease resistance

Planting the seeds of defense: Stress triggers widespread epigenetic changes that aid in disease resistance | Plant Science | Scoop.it
It was long thought that methylation, a crucial part of normal organism development, was a static modification of DNA that could not be altered by environmental conditions.
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New technology eliminates plant toxins

New technology eliminates plant toxins | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a method to hinder unwanted toxins from entering the edible parts of plants such as the oilseed rape, which will make it suitable for animal feed.
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from AnnBot
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Arabidopsis conference tweets as storify #icar #ICAR2012

The International Conference on Arabidopsis Research was held in Vienna, Austria July 3-7th 2012. As usual it was jammed packed full of interesting talks. here are all the tweets brought together.


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from Plant Cell Biology
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What to do with the plant vandals?

What to do with the plant vandals? | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Just a few more days until the threatened destruction of a field trial of GM wheat in England. At this point it's not certain if the demonstration will include vandalism, but should it, what happens next?

My fantasy is to take the vandals (and the people who encourage them, like her http://tinyurl.com/83v6me2)  to a quiet place for four years.

During that period, they'd have to pass courses in chemistry (general, organic, and physical, because without understanding chemistry you know nothing...), statistics, economics, ecology, environmental science, genetics, cell biology, biochemistry and plant physiology. Oh, and they'd have to spend a year doing experimental work (something really hard, like proteomics or electrophysiology, or whole-organismal physiology) AND come up with a publication-quality figure. If that fail the last task, a year in a refugee camp where people know what it means to really worrry about their food could substitute.....

At the end of their four years, I'd let them go. What do you think the chances would be that they'd rush off to destroy someone's experiment? I think ZERO.


Via Mary Williams, Anne Osterrieder
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Rescooped by Ruth Bastow from John Innes Centre on the web
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Rothamsted scientists to answer your questions - 5/23/2012 - Farmers Weekly

Rothamsted scientists to answer your questions - 5/23/2012 - Farmers Weekly | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Two leading scientists will be logging on to FWi Thurs 24 May for an exclusive Q&A about Rothamsted Institute's controversial GM wheat trials.

Via John Innes Centre
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