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Soil microbiomes vary in their ability to confer drought tolerance to Arabidopsis

Soil microbiomes vary in their ability to confer drought tolerance to Arabidopsis | Plant Science | Scoop.it
ny reports showing effects of whole microbiomes on the regulation of plant genes related to the sensing of abiotic stresses. We are not excluding the possibility that these effects are attributable to specific members present in the microbial consortium, but additional work is needed in this regard.
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Como gerar um inoculo a partir do solo sem autoclavar

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A Drought Resistance-Promoting Microbiome Is Selected by Root System under Desert Farming

A Drought Resistance-Promoting Microbiome Is Selected by Root System under Desert Farming | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Background Traditional agro-systems in arid areas are a bulwark for preserving soil stability and fertility, in the sight of “reverse desertification”. Nevertheless, the impact of desert farming practices on the diversity and abundance of the plant associated microbiome is poorly characterized, including its functional role in supporting plant development under drought stress. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the structure of the microbiome associated to the drought-sensitive pe
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Bacterial community inside the plant root: Plants choose soil bacteria that they allow into their roots

Bacterial community inside the plant root: Plants choose soil bacteria that they allow into their roots | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Soil is the most species-rich microbial ecosystem in the world.
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Spatio-Temporal Transcript Profiling of Rice Roots and Shoots in Response to Phosphate Starvation and Recovery

Spatio-Temporal Transcript Profiling of Rice Roots and Shoots in Response to Phosphate Starvation and Recovery | Plant Science | Scoop.it
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Temperature stress in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: a test for adaptation to soil temperature in three isolates of Funneliformis mosseae from different climates | Gavito | Agricultural and Food Sci...

Temperature stress in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: a test for adaptation to soil temperature in three isolates of Funneliformis mosseae from different climates | Gavito | Agricultural and Food Sci... | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Temperature stress in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: a test for adaptation to soil temperature in three isolates of Funneliformis mosseae from different climates
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Evidence for functional divergence in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from contrasting climatic origins - Antunes - 2010 - New Phytologist - Wiley Online Library

Evidence for functional divergence in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from contrasting climatic origins - Antunes - 2010 - New Phytologist - Wiley Online Library | Plant Science | Scoop.it
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Mechanisms underlying beneficial plant–fungus interactions in mycorrhizal symbiosis : Nature Communications : Nature Publishing Group

Mycorrhizal fungi are a heterogeneous group of diverse fungal taxa, associated with the roots of over 90% of all plant species.
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Genomes Gone Wild | The Scientist Magazine®

Genomes Gone Wild | The Scientist Magazine® | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Weird and wonderful, plant DNA is challenging preconceptions about the evolution of life, including our own species.
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Soil microbial community responses to a decade of warming as revealed by comparative metagenomics.

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Plant J: Resistance gene enrichment sequencing (RenSeq) enables reannotation of the NB-LRR gene family from sequenced plant genomes and rapid mapping of resistance loci in segregating populations (...

Plant J: Resistance gene enrichment sequencing (RenSeq) enables reannotation of the NB-LRR gene family from sequenced plant genomes and rapid mapping of resistance loci in segregating populations (... | Plant Science | Scoop.it

RenSeq is a NB-LRR (nucleotide binding-site leucine-rich repeat) gene-targeted, Resistance gene enrichment and sequencing method that enables discovery and annotation of pathogen resistance gene family members in plant genome sequences. We successfully applied RenSeq to the sequenced potato Solanum tuberosum clone DM, and increased the number of identified NB-LRRs from 438 to 755. The majority of these identified R gene loci reside in poorly or previously unannotated regions of the genome. Sequence and positional details on the 12 chromosomes have been established for 704 NB-LRRs and can be accessed through a genome browser that we provide. We compared these NB-LRR genes and the corresponding oligonucleotide baits with the highest sequence similarity and demonstrated that ~80% sequence identity is sufficient for enrichment. Analysis of the sequenced tomato S. lycopersicum ‘Heinz 1706’ extended the NB-LRR complement to 394 loci. We further describe a methodology that applies RenSeq to rapidly identify molecular markers that co-segregate with a pathogen resistance trait of interest. In two independent segregating populations involving the wild Solanum species S. berthaultii (Rpi-ber2) and S. ruiz-ceballosii (Rpi-rzc1), we were able to apply RenSeq successfully to identify markers that co-segregate with resistance towards the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. These SNP identification workflows were designed as easy-to-adapt Galaxy pipelines.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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PLOS Biology: A Temperature-Responsive Network Links Cell Shape and Virulence Traits in a Primary Fungal Pathogen

PLOS Biology: A Temperature-Responsive Network Links Cell Shape and Virulence Traits in a Primary Fungal Pathogen | Plant Science | Scoop.it

Microbial pathogens of humans display the ability to thrive at host temperature. So-called “thermally dimorphic” fungal pathogens, which include Histoplasma capsulatum, are a class of soil fungi that upon being inhaled into the human lung, undergo dramatic changes in cell shape and virulence gene expression in response to host temperature. The ability of these pathogens to cause disease is exquisitely coupled to temperature response. Here we elucidate the regulatory network that governs the ability of H. capsulatum to switch from a filamentous form in the soil environment to a pathogenic yeast form at body temperature. The circuit is driven by three transcription regulators (Ryp1, Ryp2, and Ryp3) that control yeast-phase growth. We show that these factors, which include two highly conserved proteins of the Velvet family of unknown function, bind to specific regulatory DNA elements and directly regulate expression of virulence genes. We identify and characterize Ryp4, a fourth regulator of this pathway, and define DNA motifs that recruit these transcription factors to their temperature-responsive target genes. Our results provide a molecular understanding of how changes in cell shape are linked to expression of virulence genes in thermally dimorphic fungi.


Via Francis Martin
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Increased Fitness of Rice Plants to Abiotic Stress Via Habitat Adapted Symbiosis: A Strategy for Mitigating Impacts of Climate Change

Increased Fitness of Rice Plants to Abiotic Stress Via Habitat Adapted Symbiosis: A Strategy for Mitigating Impacts of Climate Change | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Climate change and catastrophic events have contributed to rice shortages in several regions due to decreased water availability and soil salinization. Although not adapted to salt or drought stress, two commercial rice varieties achieved tolerance to these stresses by colonizing them with Class 2 fungal endophytes isolated from plants growing across moisture and salinity gradients.
Plant growth and development, water usage, ROS sensitivity and osmolytes were measured with and without stress
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number9dream - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

number9dream

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page . number9dream is the second novel by English author David Mitchell. Set in Japan, it narrates the search of 19-year-old Eiji Miyake for his father, whom he has never met.

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Working with data on the command line

Full-blown computing environments like R and Python are great for analysing a dataset in detail. But for quick and simple data inspection and manipulation, Unix command-line tools are incredibly efficient.
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reminder for myself

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A Genomics Approach to Deciphering Lignin Biosynthesis in Switchgrass

A Genomics Approach to Deciphering Lignin Biosynthesis in Switchgrass | Plant Science | Scoop.it
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Microarray

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Distinct seasonal assemblages of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi revealed by massively parallel pyrosequencing - Dumbrell - 2011 - New Phytologist - Wiley Online Library

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Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis increases relative apoplastic water flow in roots of the host plant under both well-watered and drought stress conditions

Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis increases relative apoplastic water flow in roots of the host plant under both well-watered and drought stress conditions | Plant Science | Scoop.it
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Soil temperature affects carbon allocation within arbuscular mycorrhizal networks and carbon transport from plant to fungus - HAWKES - 2007 - Global Change Biology - Wiley Online Library

Soil temperature affects carbon allocation within arbuscular mycorrhizal networks and carbon transport from plant to fungus - HAWKES - 2007 - Global Change Biology - Wiley Online Library | Plant Science | Scoop.it
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Blurred boundaries: lifestyle lessons from ectomycorrhizal fungal genomes

Blurred boundaries: lifestyle lessons from ectomycorrhizal fungal genomes | Plant Science | Scoop.it
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Perigord black truffle genome uncovers evolutionary origins and mechanisms of symbiosis : Article : Nature

Perigord black truffle genome uncovers evolutionary origins and mechanisms of symbiosis : Article : Nature | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Nature is the international weekly journal of science: a magazine style journal that publishes full-length research papers in all disciplines of science, as well as News and Views, reviews, news, features, commentaries, web focuses and more,...
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Root exudates: the hidden part of plant defense

Root exudates: the hidden part of plant defense | Plant Science | Scoop.it

The significance of root exudates as belowground defense substances has long been underestimated, presumably due to being buried out of sight. Nevertheless, this chapter of root biology has been progressively addressed within the past decade through the characterization of novel constitutively secreted and inducible phytochemicals that directly repel, inhibit, or kill pathogenic microorganisms in the rhizosphere. In addition, the complex transport machinery involved in their export has been considerably unraveled. It has become evident that the profile of defense root exudates is not only diverse in its composition, but also strikingly dynamic. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the nature and regulation of root-secreted defense compounds and the role of transport proteins in modulating their release.


Via IPM Lab, Francis Martin
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Are Soil Nematodes Beneficial Or Harmful?

Are Soil Nematodes Beneficial Or Harmful? | Plant Science | Scoop.it
Nematodes are often talked about in a quiet fearful voice. The image of the small microscopic worms can bring grown men to their knees. Unfortunately like many things in our world, a few “bad” apples have ruined the entire bushel.
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PNAS: Genome of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus provides insight into the oldest plant symbiosis (2013)

PNAS: Genome of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus provides insight into the oldest plant symbiosis (2013) | Plant Science | Scoop.it

The mutualistic symbiosis involving Glomeromycota, a distinctive phylum of early diverging Fungi, is widely hypothesized to have promoted the evolution of land plants during the middle Paleozoic. These arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) perform vital functions in the phosphorus cycle that are fundamental to sustainable crop plant productivity. The unusual biological features of AMF have long fascinated evolutionary biologists. The coenocytic hyphae host a community of hundreds of nuclei and reproduce clonally through large multinucleated spores. It has been suggested that the AMF maintain a stable assemblage of several different genomes during the life cycle, but this genomic organization has been questioned. Here we introduce the 153-Mb haploid genome of Rhizophagus irregularis and its repertoire of 28,232 genes. The observed low level of genome polymorphism (0.43 SNP per kb) is not consistent with the occurrence of multiple, highly diverged genomes. The expansion of mating-related genes suggests the existence of cryptic sex-related processes. A comparison of gene categories confirms that R. irregularis is close to the Mucoromycotina. The AMF obligate biotrophy is not explained by genome erosion or any related loss of metabolic complexity in central metabolism, but is marked by a lack of genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and of genes involved in toxin and thiamine synthesis. A battery of mycorrhiza-induced secreted proteins is expressed in symbiotic tissues. The present comprehensive repertoire of R. irregularisgenes provides a basis for future research on symbiosis-related mechanisms in Glomeromycota.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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