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Plant Pests - Global Travellers
News about spread of plants, insects, bacteria and other harmful organisms moving with trade and traffic.
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New app lets you report invasive species - Farmers Advance

New app lets you report invasive species - Ohio State University Extension has released a new app for spotting and tracking invasive species -- non-native organisms such as Asian carps, purple loosestrife and Asian longhorned beetle --...

By using the free Great Lakes Early Detection Network app, a person can take pictures of suspected invasive species -- whether of farm, woods or water -- and upload the pictures and locations for verification.

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Invasive species threatens town river

Invasive species threatens town river | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Hampton Union: Invasive species threatens town river Hampton UnionLord told selectmen that the invasive species, commonly known as phragmites, threatens to upset the ecosystem of the river and salt marsh if left unchecked.

 

Intentional import of plants for ornamental or non ornamental uses (e. g. bioremediation or bioenergy) introduced Hydrocotyle ranunculoides into Europe. They are being used in phytoremediation due to their ability to accumulate heavy metals and phosphorous (EPPO Pest Risk Analysis). Phragmites australis and Typha species are usually used for phytoremediation of contaminants in soil. Phragmites's fast and easy growing however turned into invasiveness. Nevertheless, bioremediation trials have been made in Europe. In Belgium the species was planted along watercourses in the Ghent area, from where it spread towards the border of the Netherlands. The species has also been tested for phytoremediation in Germany, but under controlled conditions. Once invasive aquatic plant is widespread, its control is both expensive and difficult. Therefore organized campaigns and programs should be started soon after observation of new aquatic invaders. Some measures are already being practiced. For example in Michigan, the removal of Phragmites plants is done by means of cutting and burning or in isolated stands by burning, while still standing, under the supervision of fire brigades should be done by the end of October (MI). 

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Invasive Plants May Not be the Best Choice for Gardens

Invasive Plants May Not be the Best Choice for Gardens | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Alison Fleck correctly stated: "Don't confuse aggressive plants with invasive plants." Aggressive plants need permanent control; however, they stay in their own territory and do not venture out into the wild and demand space. Invasive are exotic plants of certain characteristics, which after introduction to new regions start excessive growth and spread that fill in the waterways, clog the streams and replace the native plants.

 

Alien invasive plants were introduced either intentionally (e.g. for ornamental use or agroforestry purposes) or accidentally (e.g. as ballast or in livestock feed). They have now become weeds in conservation areas and agricultural land, threatening the country’s biodiversity and agriculture. In addition, they can reduce runoff from water catchment areas, thus diminish the flow in streams and adversely affecting the water table.

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Dutchman's pipe (Aristolochia elegans)

Dutchman's pipe (Aristolochia elegans) | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Dutchman's pipe is an environmental weed that is widely promoted as an unusual, easily cultivated ornamental plant. It is a popular novelty in gardens and suburban backyards and has naturalised in several areas of Quinsland and New South Wales.

 

Dutchman’s pipe (Aristolochia elegans) is regarded as an environmental weed in Queensland and New South Wales, and as a potential environmental weed or “sleeper weed” in many other regions of Australia. It is of most concern in south-eastern Queensland, and it was recently ranked among the top 50 most invasive plants in this region. It is also regarded as a potentially serious environmental weed in north-eastern New South Wales.

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Be a citizen scientist and stop the spread of invasive species in Britain - in pictures

Be a citizen scientist and stop the spread of invasive species in Britain - in pictures | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it
Have you seen one of these 10 dangerous aliens?


The list of Britain's top 10 unwanted non-native invasive species is listed in photos.

Some of those plants and animals look just nice, but....

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Dealing With Japanese Knotweed

D.I.Y Home Improvements: Since its introduction as an ornamental plant to UK in the early to mid nineteenth century, Japanese weeds has invaded canals and river banks, transport routes such as motorways and railways and huge areas of wasteland.

 

Guidance on identification and control of Japanese knotweed suggests early and radical action in order to prevent further spread.

 

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Portland in Peril gets cash to prevent invasive species

Portland in Peril gets cash to prevent invasive species | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

BBC News: Portland in Peril gets cash to prevent invasive species. A project to stop rare wildlife being destroyed by invasive plant species has been launched in Dorset.

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Giant knotweed discovered in Waihi

Giant knotweed discovered in Waihi | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Giant knotweed (Fallopia sachalinensis) is native to the Japanese island of Sakahlin. Similarly to Japanese knotweed (F. japonica) it was brought to Europe to be grown in botanical gardens, but then it escaped to the wild. Both species are similar in many respects: they multiply vegetatively by rhizomes and behave as invasives. However, giant knotweed is larger, growing over 4 m high and having leaves in range of 20-40 cm. The intermediate hybrid between Japanese Knotweed and Giant Knotweed called Fallopia x bohemica occurs in the UK and some other places in Europe.  This is particularly worrying as it may be capable of producing viable seeds, which increase its invasive potential (IVM).

 

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