Plant Pests - Global Travellers
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Plant Pests - Global Travellers
News about spread of plants, insects, bacteria and other harmful organisms moving with trade and traffic.
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EFSA - Scientific Opinion of the PLH Panel: Evaluation of the Spanish PRA on Pomacea insularum

The EFSA Scientific Panel on Plant Health considered the Spanish pest risk analysis (PRA) and has agreed with the conclusions on risk of island apple snail Pomacea insularum  with regard to (i) the potential consequences of the organism for rice crops are major; (ii) the probability for establishment of the organism is very likely and (iii) the probability of spread is estimated as likely. But the Panel does not think that the effects on the environment would be massive and the probability of entry of the organism to be high. The EFSA opinion will help the European Commission and its Standing Committee on Plant Health to decide on possible regulation of this snail species complex.


EFSA is the EU risk assessment body for food and feed safety. It provides independent scientific advice to risk managers.

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EPPO News: New perennial grass (Andropogon virginicus) found in France

EPPO News: New perennial grass (Andropogon virginicus) found in France | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

New perennial grass (Andropogon virginicus) found in France: a potentially invasive plant added to the EPPO Alert List http://t.co/mqGOMA4I...

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Damaging citrus plant disease confirmed in Texas

The Brownsville Herald (18 Jan 2012): Damaging citrus plant disease was for the first time confirmed in the Rio Grande Valley.

 

The same news were reported by The Monitor and Washington Examiner. A destructive citrus bacterial disease known to occure in crops in Florida has been confirmed in Texas. The citrus greening disease is spread by insect vector - citrus psyllid.  

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EPPO/IOBC/FAO/NEPPO Joint International Symposium on management of Tuta absoluta

EPPO/IOBC/FAO/NEPPO Joint International Symposium on management of Tuta absoluta | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it
Tuta absoluta.View the presentations made at the International Symposium in Agadir, Morocco (2011-11-16/18) http://t.co/45eJZp2n...
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Australia, China join on global food security | CRC for Plant Biosecurity

Australia, China join on global food security | CRC for Plant Biosecurity | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

The Australian Cooperative Research Centre for National Plant Biosecurity has developed memoranda of understanding with two leading Chinese science agencies and a university to mount joint research programs aimed at curbing losses of grain and other vital crops to insects, fungi and plant diseases.

Australia has been recognised as a world leader in dealing with insect pests in stored grain and has particular skills in developing clean, green approaches to grain hygiene. At the other side, building a greater understanding of the import requirements for Australian produce (as they apply to plant biosecurity) which will assist grains and horticulture industries develop further markets in China.

The cooperation in diagnostics and trials, as well as sharing of technical expertise and models of leadership in Australia and Indonesia are based on a CRC Plant Biosecurity project dealing with "A community based model to manage emergency plant pests" ($1,431,310; cash and in-kind contributions).

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Improving market access | IPPC 60 Years

Improving market access | IPPC 60 Years | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

A few hundred years ago, plant pests and diseases generally moved from place to place naturally. As technology improved, and the transport of merchandise became easier, plant pests also found easy ways to move around ...


International Plant Protection Convention is the global framework for standard setting, which is celebrating 60 years of organized work on prevention of plant resources from pest infections and infestations. Due to the global financial crisis many countries might focus less on protection of their biodiversity to the detriment  of helthier policies accepted and practiced until now. As a result, issues like the increased risks associated with internet based trade in plants and plant products are being neglected, raising the threat of new and severe pest incursions globally. 

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Invasive Species Conferences

Invasive Species events in USA: Upcoming Invasive Species Conferences are scheduled for 2012, including: Aquatics Invasive Species Summit (Pelican River Watershed District, Minnesota) -- Jan 14, 2012; North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference, Mar 13-17, 2012...

 

National Invasive Species Awareness Week, February 26 - March 3, 2012, will be a week of activities, briefings, workshops and events focused on strategizing solutions to address invasive species prevention, detection, monitoring, control, and management issues at local, state, tribal, regional, national and international scales.

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Aquatic Invasive Species Training Scheduled for Lake Service Providers

Aquatic Invasive Species Training Scheduled for Lake Service Providers | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Northland Press: All service providers must complete invasive species training and pass an examination in order to obtain a permit.

 

Minnesota passed new state law which requires that water service providers obtain permit to be able to operate in the 2012 season. All service providers must complete invasive species training and pass an examination in order to obtain the permit.

Therefore individuals or business, hired to install or remove water related equipment, such as boats, docks, or structures from water of the state, will play an important role in aquatic invasive species prevention. 

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Dutchman's pipe (Aristolochia elegans)

Dutchman's pipe (Aristolochia elegans) | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Dutchman's pipe is an environmental weed that is widely promoted as an unusual, easily cultivated ornamental plant. It is a popular novelty in gardens and suburban backyards and has naturalised in several areas of Quinsland and New South Wales.

 

Dutchman’s pipe (Aristolochia elegans) is regarded as an environmental weed in Queensland and New South Wales, and as a potential environmental weed or “sleeper weed” in many other regions of Australia. It is of most concern in south-eastern Queensland, and it was recently ranked among the top 50 most invasive plants in this region. It is also regarded as a potentially serious environmental weed in north-eastern New South Wales.

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Invasive Plants May Not be the Best Choice for Gardens

Invasive Plants May Not be the Best Choice for Gardens | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Alison Fleck correctly stated: "Don't confuse aggressive plants with invasive plants." Aggressive plants need permanent control; however, they stay in their own territory and do not venture out into the wild and demand space. Invasive are exotic plants of certain characteristics, which after introduction to new regions start excessive growth and spread that fill in the waterways, clog the streams and replace the native plants.

 

Alien invasive plants were introduced either intentionally (e.g. for ornamental use or agroforestry purposes) or accidentally (e.g. as ballast or in livestock feed). They have now become weeds in conservation areas and agricultural land, threatening the country’s biodiversity and agriculture. In addition, they can reduce runoff from water catchment areas, thus diminish the flow in streams and adversely affecting the water table.

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Invasive species threatens town river

Invasive species threatens town river | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Hampton Union: Invasive species threatens town river Hampton UnionLord told selectmen that the invasive species, commonly known as phragmites, threatens to upset the ecosystem of the river and salt marsh if left unchecked.

 

Intentional import of plants for ornamental or non ornamental uses (e. g. bioremediation or bioenergy) introduced Hydrocotyle ranunculoides into Europe. They are being used in phytoremediation due to their ability to accumulate heavy metals and phosphorous (EPPO Pest Risk Analysis). Phragmites australis and Typha species are usually used for phytoremediation of contaminants in soil. Phragmites's fast and easy growing however turned into invasiveness. Nevertheless, bioremediation trials have been made in Europe. In Belgium the species was planted along watercourses in the Ghent area, from where it spread towards the border of the Netherlands. The species has also been tested for phytoremediation in Germany, but under controlled conditions. Once invasive aquatic plant is widespread, its control is both expensive and difficult. Therefore organized campaigns and programs should be started soon after observation of new aquatic invaders. Some measures are already being practiced. For example in Michigan, the removal of Phragmites plants is done by means of cutting and burning or in isolated stands by burning, while still standing, under the supervision of fire brigades should be done by the end of October (MI). 

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Plant Pests and Diseases Topic

Plant Pests and Diseases Topic | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Plants are living organisms and, like any living organism, are susceptible to disease. From fungal diseases to viral and bacterial infections, there are many different diseases that plants can fall victims to. The interactions between plants and disease organisms are complex. Understanding basic concepts and principles of how diseases develop, could be half a way to their management.

 

Many insects, like caterpillars and leaf beetles, mites and nematodes feed on plants. We call these animals phytophagous. If their population growth is too high or they are very specialized to certain plant species, they become pests and cause significant damage in agriculture, horticulture, forests and other ecosystems. In some instances plants themselves can become or be considered pests, if they are invasive and harmful to other plant species and different organisms.

 

The scope of this topic is to bring news on the occurrence, risk and status of new or regulated organisms, harmful to plants, after being introduced into new areas of the globe, or on the risk of their introduction.

 

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EPPO News: Sakhalin-fir bark beetle - pest alert

EPPO News: Sakhalin-fir bark beetle - pest alert | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

New EPPO Pest Alert: Polygraphus proximus (Sakhalin-fir bark beetle), a pest of fir trees (Abies) spreading in Russia.

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Current and Potential Trade in Horticultural Products Irradiated for Phytosanitary Purposes

Current and Potential Trade in Horticultural Products Irradiated for Phytosanitary Purposes | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Life Sciences Social Network highlights the research, which examined the trade in horticultural products irradiated for phytosanitary purposes and market growth potential for the irradiated horticultural products per commodities and regions, since regulatory conditions become more favorable.

 

The paper "Current and Potential Trade in Horticultural Products Irradiated for Phytosanitary Purposes" describes strategies for enhancing trade in irradiated fresh fruits such as mango, papaya, citrus, grapes, and vegetables such as tomatoes, onions, asparagus, garlic, and peppers from Asia and the Americas, which show the greatest potential for the application of this phytosanitary treatment method. 

 

The reason for phytosanitary treatments are frequently intercepted fruits and vegetable in international trade due to the fact that these commodities harbour very harmful pests and diseases, which can spread in the country of destination and be harmful for plants and nature there. Interception is usually done at border inspection post of country of import and in case of suspicion goods are kept in quarantine pending laboratory confirmation of regulated harmful organisms. Goods are released, if the lab results are negative, or after effective phytosanitary treatment. Since pests and diseases, which are invasive in Europe, often come with plant goods of Asian or American origin, pre-shipment phytosanitary treatment is good solution for logistics in international trade. The international standard ISPM 28 presents in its Annexes phytosanitary treatments evaluated and adopted by the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures.

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Researchers Discover Green Pesticide for Invasive Citrus Pest Princeps demoleus

Researchers Discover Green Pesticide for Invasive Citrus Pest Princeps demoleus | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

ScienceNewsline; Biology: According to a new study published in the Journal of Economic Entomology (Vol. 104, No. 6, Dec. 2011) by University of Florida researchers (Lewis et al.), a key amino acid essential for human nutrition is also an effective insecticide against caterpillars that threaten the citrus industry. Namely, Southeast Asian citrus-feeding larvae of Princeps (Papilio) demoleus (L.) were recently introduced into the Americas, causing an imminent threat to citrus production and ornamental flora. In the research the human nutrient amino acid methionine, sprayed on plants, showed toxic effects for larvae, therefore may be a candidate environmentally safe biorational pesticide for use against invasive P. demoleus in the Americas.

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QBOL/EPPO Conference on DNA barcoding and diagnostic methods for plant pests - Call for presentations

QBOL/EPPO Conference on DNA barcoding and diagnostic methods for plant pests - Call for presentations | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

@EPPOnews, 17 Jan. 2012:

A  joint conference will be organised by QBOL project, the Dutch Plant Protection Service and the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organisation in Haarlem (the Netherlands) on 21/25 May 2012.

 

Preliminary program and preregistration details have been just published. The Quarantine organisms Barcode Of Life project (QBOL) seeks to generate DNA barcode information for vouchered specimens of quarantine pests and form a publically available database.

Speakers at the conference are invited to givel oral or poster presentations regarding diagnostic methods in the different sessions and to contribute to development of a new diagnostic tool using DNA barcoding to identify quarantine organisms in support of plant health.

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The global spread of Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): distribution, dispersal and routes of invasion

Released as a biological control agent of aphids and coccids, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) has spread from Asia to four additional continents. Since 1988 H. axyridis has established in at least 38 countries in its introduced range: three countries in North America, six in South America, 26 in Europe and three in Africa.

Photo robsplants.com

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New plant disease records from CABI scientists in 2011

New plant disease records from CABI scientists in 2011 | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

When it has been confirmed that a pest has been found in a new place or on a new plant host, CABI scientists publish their report in a peer-reviewed journal such as New Disease Reports to communicate their findings.  

 

This is the usual practice of scientists, involved in biology, forestry or agricultural research to inform scientific community on their first findings. But in case of phytopathogenic organisms this is usually prescribed in the phytosanitary legislation. If an organism has invasive character, it could be then stopped and eradicated at its first finding or first outbreak in a new area. Based on the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) a global network of pest reporting is functioning at International Phytosanitary Portal (IPP). Furthermore, reporting services operate at regional (APPPC, CA, COSAVE, CPC, EPPO, IAPSC, NAPPO, OIRSA, PPPO) and national level.

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Boxwood Blight is the Latest Threat

Boxwood Blight is the Latest Threat | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Litchfield County Times: Boxwood Blight is the Latest Threat  

“This whole thing exploded onto the scene in Connecticut in October, so it is very new,” said Dr. Douglas.

 

A new threat faces landscapers and property owners in Connecticut with the eruption of a newly identified boxwood blight (Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum), which threatens to attack and kill thousands of boxwood plants in the region in coming months. The finding of this fungus was also officially recorded by national plant protection services of North Carolina, Connecticut and Virginia. 

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Giant knotweed discovered in Waihi

Giant knotweed discovered in Waihi | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Giant knotweed (Fallopia sachalinensis) is native to the Japanese island of Sakahlin. Similarly to Japanese knotweed (F. japonica) it was brought to Europe to be grown in botanical gardens, but then it escaped to the wild. Both species are similar in many respects: they multiply vegetatively by rhizomes and behave as invasives. However, giant knotweed is larger, growing over 4 m high and having leaves in range of 20-40 cm. The intermediate hybrid between Japanese Knotweed and Giant Knotweed called Fallopia x bohemica occurs in the UK and some other places in Europe.  This is particularly worrying as it may be capable of producing viable seeds, which increase its invasive potential (IVM).

 

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Dealing With Japanese Knotweed

D.I.Y Home Improvements: Since its introduction as an ornamental plant to UK in the early to mid nineteenth century, Japanese weeds has invaded canals and river banks, transport routes such as motorways and railways and huge areas of wasteland.

 

Guidance on identification and control of Japanese knotweed suggests early and radical action in order to prevent further spread.

 

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Legislature lost in the weeds - Stockton Record

Legislature lost in the weeds - Stockton Record | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

In the Dec. 21 article, "New weed poses major Delta threat," an opinion is given that an official action is required to limit the spread of sponge plant.

 

West Indian sponge plant or amazon frogbit (Limnobium laevigatum) is widespread in America. It has been observed in the wild in Europe, but did not naturalize so far. It can be found growing wild in lakes, ponds, and slow rivers all over Central and South America. Its floating and fast growing nature does not support the ideas to use it as ornamental plant in back yard pond, specially in regions, where it has not yet been present. Easy care in aquarium, but difficult when it escapes.

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Portland in Peril gets cash to prevent invasive species

Portland in Peril gets cash to prevent invasive species | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

BBC News: Portland in Peril gets cash to prevent invasive species. A project to stop rare wildlife being destroyed by invasive plant species has been launched in Dorset.

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