Plant Pests - Global Travellers
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Plant Pests - Global Travellers
News about spread of plants, insects, bacteria and other harmful organisms moving with trade and traffic.
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Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health: Free Don't Move ...

Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health: Free Don't Move ... | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it
Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health ... Launching the eXtension Invasive Species Community. ... National Forest System Invasive Species Management. ... The Threat of Invasive Species on CBS News ...
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A map of the range of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug in USA

A map of the range of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug in USA | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

A map of the range of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug at the #IPM Symposium. #IPM2012 Candace Pollock @SouthernSARE

Halyomorpha halys, the brown marmorated stink bug is an insect in the family Pentatomidae, and it is native to China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. It was accidentally introduced into the United States, with the first specimen being collected in September 1998. The brown marmorated stink bug is considered to be an agricultural pest, and by 2010-11 has become a season-long pest in U.S. orchards.

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An economic analysis of Emerald Ash Borer management options - Eureka! Science News

An economic analysis of Emerald Ash Borer management options - Eureka! Science News | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it
Eureka! Science NewsAn economic analysis of Emerald Ash Borer management optionsEureka!
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EPPO Alert on Zigzag elm sawfly

EPPO Alert on Zigzag elm sawfly | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

Photo: J. Martin, Spain

 

New addition to the EPPO Alert list: Zigzag elm sawfly Aproceros leucopoda (Hymenoptera: Argidae). 

 

Severe defoliation and branch dieback of native and non-native elms in central Europe caused by an East-Asian sawfly Aproceros leucopoda has been reported several times in last years. The pest is a multivoltine species having four generations per year with female populations reproducing by parthenogenesis.

 

Due to its observation already in 10 countries in the region it is very likely that A. leucopoda is able to establish in the centre and south of the EPPO region where cultivated or wild elms are grown.

 

Considering that the abundance of elm trees has dramatically declined in Europe over the last decades due to Dutch elm disease and the fact that the new pest has a high potential for spread and damage, the EPPO Secretariat decided to add A. leucopoda to the EPPO Alert List.

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Invasive Species-Emerald Ash Borer

Invasive Species-Emerald Ash Borer | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

The Mighty Angler: The emerald ash borer is native to Asia and is thought to have been introduced here by wood cargo transported in shipping cargo from China to the Great Lake area. It was first discovered in Michigan near Detroit in 2002. Since then it has reportedly killed over 5 million ash trees across the northeast. It is also now present in the southern border areas of Canada.

This species is spreading incredibly fast and considering that there are a variety of ash trees in most of the U.S. states; this invader could do massive destruction in the very near future. Once attacked by these beetles, the tree will usually be dead in three to five years.

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Gardens Inspired: Destructive Insects - Control of the Japanese Beetle

Gardens Inspired: Destructive Insects - Control of the Japanese Beetle | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

In its native Japan, where the Beetle's natural enemies keep its populations in check, the Japanese Beetle (Popillia japonica) is not a serious plant pest. 

But, in the United States, the beetle entered without its natural enemies and found a favorable climate and an abundant food supply. By 1972, beetle infestations had been reported in 22 States east of the Mississippi River and also in Arkansas, Iowa, and Missouri. Since then, the pest has spread to Southern and Western States, but tough regulations and careful monitoring have prevented its establishment there. Without its natural checks and balances, the Japanese beetle has become a serious plant pest and a threat to American agriculture.

Today, the Japanese beetle is the most widespread turf-grass pest in the United States. Efforts to control the larval and adult stages are estimated to cost more than $460 million a year. Losses attributable to the larval stage alone have been estimated at $234 million per year—$78 million for control costs and an additional $156 million for replacement of damaged turf.

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“Anastrepha conflua,” new fruit fly species | Smithsonian Science

“Anastrepha conflua,” new fruit fly species | Smithsonian Science | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it
Anastrepha conflua, one of seven new species of fruit fly from the genus Anastrepha Schiner that are described in a new paper by USDA entomologist Allen Norrbom, Systematic Entomology Laboratory of the Smithsonian's ...
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