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Plant Pests - Global Travellers
News about spread of plants, insects, bacteria and other harmful organisms moving with trade and traffic.
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Spotted Wing Drosophila research review

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In second year of research of biology and management of Spotted Wing Drosophila on small and stone fruits some biological data and control methods have been already known. Spotted wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) is an invasive pest that attacks multiple fresh fruits. It is fast becoming a problem in the Pacific Northwest as well as in Europe. Entomologists at University of California – Davis, Washington State University and Oregon State University have provided first results of their research work.

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A map of the range of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug in USA

A map of the range of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug in USA | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it

A map of the range of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug at the #IPM Symposium. #IPM2012 Candace Pollock @SouthernSARE

Halyomorpha halys, the brown marmorated stink bug is an insect in the family Pentatomidae, and it is native to China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. It was accidentally introduced into the United States, with the first specimen being collected in September 1998. The brown marmorated stink bug is considered to be an agricultural pest, and by 2010-11 has become a season-long pest in U.S. orchards.

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Ohio-Cooperative Eradication Program-Asian longhorn beetle

The Asian longhorn beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is an invasive pest from Asia that came to the US concealed in solid wood packing material (pallets, crates and dunnage), used to transport goods from overseas. It was first detected in the US in 1996 in Brooklyn, NY. Ohio is the fifth state to detect the destructive pest species, which infests healthy and stressed deciduous hardwood tree species, such as maple, birch, horse chestnut, poplar, willow, elm, and ash.

Since November 2011 cooperative eradication program is ongoing with removals of infested trees. Ground and aerial survey crews continue to conduct delimiting surveys, inspecting all host trees throughout the regulated areas.

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Alien wood borers in US and Canada

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"Invasive beetles that bore into trees have become a very big problem in the United States and Canada. Many of these beetles are also vectors of plant diseases. This edition of the WPDN News and Pest Update discusses examples of boring beetles that have come into the United States since 1980. The jump in the number of non-native borers since 1980 is likely a result of the widespread increase in containerized shipping. Wood-boring insects can be transported in wood pallets, wood crating, and dunnage (unprocessed timbers) used to protect and support cargo in containers. Other exotic forest pests arrive on live plants imported for planting or propagation, while other insects simply hitchhike on imported cargo."

Editor: Richard W. Hoenisch
@Copyright Regents of the University of California

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“Anastrepha conflua,” new fruit fly species | Smithsonian Science

“Anastrepha conflua,” new fruit fly species | Smithsonian Science | Plant Pests - Global Travellers | Scoop.it
Anastrepha conflua, one of seven new species of fruit fly from the genus Anastrepha Schiner that are described in a new paper by USDA entomologist Allen Norrbom, Systematic Entomology Laboratory of the Smithsonian's ...
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Damaging citrus plant disease confirmed in Texas

The Brownsville Herald (18 Jan 2012): Damaging citrus plant disease was for the first time confirmed in the Rio Grande Valley.

 

The same news were reported by The Monitor and Washington Examiner. A destructive citrus bacterial disease known to occure in crops in Florida has been confirmed in Texas. The citrus greening disease is spread by insect vector - citrus psyllid.  

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