plant pathology
7 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by parthagen from Plant Immunity And Microbial Effectors
Scoop.it!

PLOS ONE: Identification and Characterisation CRN Effectors in Phytophthora capsici Shows Modularity and Functional Diversity (2013)

PLOS ONE: Identification and Characterisation CRN Effectors in Phytophthora capsici Shows Modularity and Functional Diversity (2013) | plant pathology | Scoop.it

Phytophthora species secrete a large array of effectors during infection of their host plants. The Crinkler (CRN) gene family encodes a ubiquitous but understudied class of effectors with possible but as of yet unknown roles in infection. To appreciate CRN effector function inPhytophthora, we devised a simple Crn gene identification and annotation pipeline to improve effector prediction rates. We predicted 84 full-length CRN coding genes and assessed CRN effector domain diversity in sequenced Oomycete genomes. These analyses revealed evidence of CRN domain innovation in Phytophthora and expansion in the Peronosporales. We performed gene expression analyses to validate and define two classes of CRN effectors, each possibly contributing to infection at different stages. CRN localisation studies revealed that P. capsici CRN effector domains target the nucleus and accumulate in specific sub-nuclear compartments. Phenotypic analyses showed that few CRN domains induce necrosis when expressed in planta and that one cell death inducing effector, enhances P. capsicivirulence on Nicotiana benthamiana. These results suggest that the CRN protein family form an important class of intracellular effectors that target the host nucleus during infection. These results combined with domain expansion in hemi-biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, suggests specific contributions to pathogen lifestyles. This work will bolster CRN identification efforts in other sequenced oomycete species and set the stage for future functional studies towards understanding CRN effector functions.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL, IPM Lab
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by parthagen from Microbes
Scoop.it!

Video: Plant Pathology: Taking you further than you ever imagined.

In the quest to create a sustainable future, some paths are more direct...more profound...and more tuned-in to discovering the roots of the serious problems that need to be solved. And with the next generation seeing world population swell from 7 to 9 billion people, how will we sustainably increase our food, fiber and fuels using less land and fewer resources? One word: plants. And healthy plants are key. But plants get sick, too. And when disease strikes, disaster can quickly follow. That's why it's more important than ever that today's brightest and best choose their course wisely...and explore new paths that get to the root of some of the most critical problems. For those with insight...for those ready to make an impact, plant pathology is a path that can take you further than you'd ever imagined, or exactly where you'd like to be.

 

Learn about Plant Pathology through this exciting educational video. This video targets undergraduates in biology and related majors with limited agricultural background, and is available for use in classroom settings, on organization websites, on display at career fairs. You can also share it with your colleagues, the opportunities are endless.

To find out more about how to spread the word visit the American Phytopathological Society's website. www.apsnet.org

 

APS also has significant outreach resources. If this video piques your interest, check out our other tools for teach and growing plant pathology. http://www.apsnet.org/members/outreach


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL, David Biate
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by parthagen from Forest health
Scoop.it!

Molecular Plant Pathology - Free posters - Wiley Online Library

Molecular Plant Pathology - Free posters - Wiley Online Library | plant pathology | Scoop.it

“The Top 10 pathogens (fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes) in Plant Pathology http://t.co/Oxogpgi21x”


Via Richard Hamelin
more...
Richard Hamelin's curator insight, December 2, 2013 11:51 AM
Top 10 plant pathogens.
Rescooped by parthagen from Plant Immunity And Microbial Effectors
Scoop.it!

Effectors as Tools in Disease Resistance Breeding Against Biotrophic, Hemibiotrophic, and Necrotrophic Plant Pathogens

Effectors as Tools in Disease Resistance Breeding Against Biotrophic, Hemibiotrophic, and Necrotrophic Plant Pathogens | plant pathology | Scoop.it
Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 196-206, March 2014.

Via IPM Lab
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by parthagen from Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
Scoop.it!

PeerJ: Galaxy tools and workflows for sequence analysis with applications in molecular plant pathology (2013)

PeerJ: Galaxy tools and workflows for sequence analysis with applications in molecular plant pathology (2013) | plant pathology | Scoop.it

The Galaxy Project offers the popular web browser-based platform Galaxy for running bioinformatics tools and constructing simple workflows. Here, we present a broad collection of additional Galaxy tools for large scale analysis of gene and protein sequences. The motivating research theme is the identification of specific genes of interest in a range of non-model organisms, and our central example is the identification and prediction of “effector” proteins produced by plant pathogens in order to manipulate their host plant. This functional annotation of a pathogen’s predicted capacity for virulence is a key step in translating sequence data into potential applications in plant pathology.

 

This collection includes novel tools, and widely-used third-party tools such as NCBI BLAST+ wrapped for use within Galaxy. Individual bioinformatics software tools are typically available separately as standalone packages, or in online browser-based form. The Galaxy framework enables the user to combine these and other tools to automate organism scale analyses as workflows, without demanding familiarity with command line tools and scripting. Workflows created using Galaxy can be saved and are reusable, so may be distributed within and between research groups, facilitating the construction of a set of standardised, reusable bioinformatic protocols.

 

The Galaxy tools and workflows described in this manuscript are open source and freely available from the Galaxy Tool Shed http://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL, Chris Upton + helpers
more...
julien levy's curator insight, September 23, 2013 12:24 PM

Iplant or Galaxy webbased ?

 

Scooped by parthagen
Scoop.it!

PLANT PATHOLOGY TECHNICIAN / LAB RESEARCHER - W MIDLANDS - Farming UK

PLANT PATHOLOGY TECHNICIAN / LAB RESEARCHER - W MIDLANDS Farming UK On behalf of a prestigious international crop protection client - we are seeking an individual to work as an Efficacy Technician, or Plant Pathology Technician, within the R & D...
more...
No comment yet.