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Rescooped by Christian Faltado Cantos from Amazing Science
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Forget GMO fear: DuPont Predicts CRISPR GMO Plants on Dinner Plates in 5 Years

Forget GMO fear: DuPont Predicts CRISPR GMO Plants on Dinner Plates in 5 Years | Plant Mitochondria | Scoop.it

Agricultural biotech giants are starting to make moves into CRISPR gene editing, saying they’ll be selling seeds engineered with the technology by the end of this decade.

DuPont said today it entered an agreement with Caribou Biosciences, a spin-off from the laboratory of Jennifer Doudna at the University of California, Berkeley, who carried out key work on CRISPR-Cas9, a technology that provides something like a find-and-replace feature for DNA.

DuPont says it is already growing corn and wheat plants edited with CRISPR in greenhouses and that field trials will start next spring.

“We are talking about bringing products to market in five to 10 years,” says Neal Gutterson, vice president for agricultural biotechnology at Pioneer Hi-Bred, part of DuPont’s $11-billion-per-year crop chemicals and biotech seed business. “That is a pretty damn good time line compared to other technology.”

DuPont is testing CRISPR to make drought-resistant corn as well as wheat genetically altered so it will breed like a hybrid, rather than self-pollinate as it typically does. Hybrid plants are vigorous, and yields can jump by 10 or 15 percent.

A growing list of plant types have already been genetically engineered with CRISPR-Cas9 in academic laboratories, including soybeans, rice, and potatoes. Last month, a Japanese team used gene editing to turn off fruit-ripening genes in tomato plants.

 

As part of their collaboration, DuPont said it had made an investment in Caribou, a small startup that holds commercial rights to patents Berkeley has applied for on CRISPR-Cas9. DuPont will have exclusive rights to those patents in crops like corn and soybeans, should they be approved.


Currently, most GMOs are transgenic plants that have been engineered by adding bacterial genes to the plants so that they poison insects or survive weed sprays. Thanks to biotechnology, the seed business has ballooned to about $40 billion a year, and companies like Monsanto, Dow, DuPont, and Syngenta have come to dominate it. But the need to invest millions more in a sweeping technology shift hits as depressed commodity markets have made the profitability of biotech seeds less certain.


Gutterson says DuPont thinks gene editing will kick off a new wave of products and profits. “We have no doubt that genome editing is going to have a material impact on the value proposition,” he says. “We think another whole cycle could come from genome editing.”


Gene editing could lead to some surprising creations in agriculture. For instance, peanuts have a number of proteins responsible for allergies. Getting rid of them is challenging, but allergy-free peanuts might be possible with the new technology.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Christian Faltado Cantos's insight:

Gene editing could lead to some surprising creations in agriculture.

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Ines Jurisic's curator insight, October 19, 2015 7:48 AM

."..Thanks to biotechnology, the seed business has ballooned to about $40 billion a year, and companies like Monsanto, Dow, DuPont, and Syngenta have come to dominate it." -----------In Money we Trust:( 

Rescooped by Christian Faltado Cantos from Geography Education
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40 Ways The World Makes Awesome Hot Dogs

40 Ways The World Makes Awesome Hot Dogs | Plant Mitochondria | Scoop.it

"It’s not just a sausage in a bun; it’s a beautiful blank canvas. It’s a hot dog, which is a foodstuff eaten worldwide. Here are 40 distinctive varieties from around the globe — from iconic NYC 'dirty water dogs' to fully loaded South American street-cart dogs to Japanese octo-dogs. There is a tubesteak out there for every craving that ever was."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:50 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 

 

Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 2016 8:10 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 


Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 14, 2016 11:05 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 


Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.