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Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis, intraradical CARBON flow (Live Imaging)

Rice (Oryza sativa) + Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices). Green: rice phosphate transporter PT11-GFP, Red: Nile Red.
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Plant-Microbe Symbioses
Symbiotic associations between plants and microbes
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The importance of symbiosis of Mesorhizobium with Astralagus sinicus in the bioremediation of cadmium in organic soils

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he Use of Biostimulants for Enhancing Nutrient Uptake

Fertilizer use in modern agriculture is highly inefficient; much of the applied fertilizer is released into the environment, causing environmental degradation. One way in which fertilizer use can be reduced without damaging plant nutrition is to enhance crop uptake of nutrients through the use of biostimulants. A broad definition of plant biostimulants, including substances sometimes categorized as biofertilizers or biopesticides, is used throughout this review: “Plant biostimulants are substances or materials, with the exception of nutrients and pesticides, which, when applied to plants, seeds, or growing substrates in specific formulations, have the capacity to modify physiological processes in plants in a way that provides potential benefits to growth, development, or stress response.” This definition includes a variety of substances, four of which will be reviewed in this article: seaweed extract, humic substances, amino acids, and plant-growth-promoting bacteria. We will concentrate on the positive effects of biostimulant application on plant nutrient uptake, and the underlying mechanisms, which include positive changes in soil structure or nutrient solubility, root morphology, plant physiology, and symbiotic relationships, will be discussed. Recommendations for future research directions include finding the most promising substances, isolating the active ingredients and clearly demonstrating the mechanisms by which they affect nutrient uptake. The beneficial effects and mechanisms must be consistently demonstrated in greenhouse and field experiments.
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Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in soil from the Pampa Ondulada, Argentina, assessed by pyrosequencing and morphological techniques

The aim of this study was to assess the effects of agronomic practices on the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal community in soils from the Pampa Ondulada region (Argentina), and to compare conclusions reached when using pyrosequencing or a morphological approach. The AM fungal diversity of 3 agricultural exploitations located in the Pampa Ondulada region (Argentina) was assessed by using 454 amplicon pyrosequencing and morphological (based on spore traits) approaches. Two kinds of soil managements are found in these sites: agronomic and non-agronomic. A total of 188 molecular operational taxonomic units and 29 morphological species of AM fungi were identified. No effect of soil management on AM richness was detected. AM fungal communities were more diverse and equitable in the absence of agronomic management. In contrast, the results on β-diversity varied according to the methodology used. We concluded that agronomic management of soil has a negative effect on AM fungal community biodiversity in the Pampa Ondulada region. We also conclude that both methodologies complement each other in the study of AM fungal ecology. This study greatly improved the knowledge about AM fungi in South America where the molecular diversity of AM fungi was practically unknown.
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Interplant signalling through hyphal networks

Mycorrhizal fungi can form common mycelial networks (CMNs) that interconnect plants. Here, we provide an insight into recent findings demonstrating that CMNs can be conduits for interplant signalling, influencing defence against insect herbivores and foliar necrotrophic fungi. A likely mechanism is direct transfer of signalling molecules within hyphae. However, electrical signals, which can be induced by wounding, may also enable signalling over relatively long distances, because the biophysical constraints imposed by liquid transport in hyphae and interaction with soil are relieved. We do not yet understand the ecological, evolutionary and agronomic implications of interplant signalling via CMNs. Identifying the mechanism of interplant signalling will help to address these gaps.
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Excellent review

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How harmonious are arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses? Inconsistent concepts reflect different mindsets as well as results

How harmonious are arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses? Inconsistent concepts reflect different mindsets as well as results | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
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The Soybean Mycorrhiza-Inducible Phosphate Transporter Gene, GmPT7, also Shows Localized Expression at the Tips of Vein Endings of Senescent Leaves

GmPT7 was originally identified as an arbuscular mycorrhiza-inducible gene of soybean that encodes a member of subfamily I in the PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER 1 family. In the present study, we established conditions under which a number of dwarf soybean plants complete their life cycles in a growth chamber. Using this system, we grew transgenic soybean with a GmPT7 promoter–β-glucuronidase fusion gene and evaluated GmPT7 expression in detail. GmPT7 was highly expressed in mature, but not in collapsed, arbuscule-containing cortical cells, suggesting its importance in the absorption of fungus-derived phosphate and/or arbuscule development. GmPT7 was also expressed in the columella cells of root caps and in the lateral root primordia of non-mycorrhizal roots. The expression of GmPT7 occurred only in the late stage of phosphorus translocation from leaves to seeds, after water evaporation from the leaves ceased, and later than the expression of GmUPS1-2, GmNRT1.7a and GmNRT1.7b, which are possibly involved in nitrogen export. GmPT7 expression was localized in a pair of tracheid elements at the tips of vein endings of senescent leaves. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the tip tracheid elements in yellow leaves were still viable and had intact plasma membranes. Thus, we think that GmPT7 on the plasma membranes transports phosphate from the apoplast into the tip elements. GmPT7 knockdown resulted in no significant effects, the function of GmPT7 remaining to be clarified. We propose a working model in which phosphate incorporated in vein endings moves to seeds via xylem to phloem transfer.
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Soil Fungal Communities Respond to Grassland Plant Community Richness and Soil Edaphics

Soil Fungal Communities Respond to Grassland Plant Community Richness and Soil Edaphics | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
Fungal communities in soil have significant influences on terrestrial ecosystem dynamics, yet our understanding of the drivers of fungal diversity and community structure in soil is limited. Fungal communities associated with the rhizosphere of four native perennial grassland plant species, two legumes and two grasses, grown in monoculture and polyculture in a long-term field experiment were characterized. Reference databases were developed for, and amplicon libraries sequenced from, multiple-copy rRNA and single-copy protein-coding loci. Clustering and alignment-based pipelines were utilized to evaluate differences in fungal community structure and diversity in response to plant host, plant community richness, and soil edaphics. Fungal diversity increased in the rhizosphere of plants growing in polyculture plant communities as compared to monoculture plant communities. Fungal community structure was differentiated between legumes and grasses growing in monoculture but not in polyculture. To specifically monitor fungi in the genus Fusarium in the soil, the protein-coding locus was used to increase phylogenetic resolution and enrich for this taxon. These data show that fungal community richness and structure are strongly linked with plant community dynamics and associated soil edaphic characteristics in these grassland soils.
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Advances in Host Plant and Rhizobium Genomics to Enhance Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Grain Legumes

Advances in Host Plant and Rhizobium Genomics to Enhance Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Grain Legumes | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
Legumes form symbiotic relationship with root-nodule, rhizobia. The nitrogen (N2) fixed by legumes is a renewable source and of great importance to agriculture. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) is constrained by multiple stresses and alleviating them would improve SNF contribution to agroecosystems. Genetic differences in adaptation tolerance to various stresses are known in both host plant and rhizobium. The discovery and use of promiscuous germplasm in soybean led to the release of high-yielding cultivars in Africa. High N2-fixing soybean cultivars are commercially grown in Australia and some countries in Africa and South America and those of pea in Russia. SNF is a complex trait, governed by multigenes with varying effects. Few major quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes underlying QTL are reported in grain and model legumes. Nodulating genes in model legumes are cloned and orthologs determined in grain legumes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from nodulation genes are available in common bean and soybean. Genomes of chickpea, pigeonpea, and soybean; and genomes of several rhizobium species are decoded. Expression studies revealed few genes associated with SNF in model and grain legumes. Advances in host plant and rhizobium genomics are helping identify DNA markers to aid breeding of legume cultivars with high symbiotic efficiency. A paradigm shift is needed by breeding programs to simultaneously improve host plant and rhizobium to harness the strength of positive symbiotic interactions in cultivar development. Computation models based on metabolic reconstruction pathways are providing greater insights to explore genotype–phenotype relationships in SNF. Models to simulate the response of N2 fixation to a range of environmental variables and crop growth are assisting researchers to quantify SNF for efficient and sustainable agricultural production systems. Such knowledge helps identifying bottlenecks in specific legume–rhizobia systems that could be overcome by legume breeding to enhance SNF. This review discusses the recent developments to improve SNF and productivity of grain legumes.
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Mycorrhizal phenotypes and the Law of the Minimum

Mycorrhizal phenotypes and the Law of the Minimum | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
Mycorrhizal phenotypes arise from interactions among plant and fungal genotypes and the environment. Differences in the stoichiometry and uptake capacity of fungi and plants make arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi inherently more nitrogen (N) limited and less phosphorus (P) limited than their host plants. Mutualistic phenotypes are most likely in P-limited systems and commensal or parasitic phenotypes in N-limited systems. Carbon (C) limitation is expected to cause phenotypes to shift from mutualism to commensalism and even parasitism.
Two experiments compared the influence of fertilizer and shade on mycorrhizas in Andropogon gerardii across three naturally N-limited or P-limited grasslands. A third experiment examined the interactive effects of N and P enrichment and shade on A. gerardii mycorrhizas.
Our experiments generated the full spectrum of mycorrhizal phenotypes. These findings support the hypothesis that mutualism is likely in P-limited systems and commensalism or parasitism is likely in N-limited systems. Furthermore, shade decreased C-assimilation and generated less mutualistic mycorrhizal phenotypes with reduced plant and fungal biomass.
Soil fertility is a key controller of mycorrhizal costs and benefits and the Law of the Minimum is a useful predictor of mycorrhizal phenotype. In our experimental grasslands arbuscular mycorrhizas can ameliorate P-limitation but not N-limitation.
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Excellent paper... very cool study.

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Horizontal transfer of carbohydrate metabolism genes into ectomycorrhizal Amanita

Horizontal transfer of carbohydrate metabolism genes into ectomycorrhizal Amanita | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it

The genus Amanita encompasses both symbiotic, ectomycorrhizal fungi and asymbiotic litter decomposers; all species are derived from asymbiotic ancestors. Symbiotic species are no longer able to degrade plant cell walls. The carbohydrate esterases family 1 (CE1s) is a diverse group of enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, including decomposition and carbon storage. CE1 genes of the ectomycorrhizal A. muscaria appear diverged from all other fungal homologues, and more similar to CE1s of bacteria, suggesting a horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event.In order to test whether AmanitaCE1s were acquired horizontally, we built a phylogeny of CE1s collected from across the tree of life, and describe the evolution of CE1 genes among Amanita and relevant lineages of bacteria.CE1s of symbiotic Amanita were very different from CE1s of asymbiotic Amanita, and are more similar to bacterial CE1s. The protein structure of one CE1 gene of A. muscaria matched a depolymerase that degrades the carbon storage molecule poly((R)-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). Asymbiotic Amanita do not carry sequence or structural homologues of these genes.The CE1s acquired through HGT may enable novel metabolisms, or play roles in signaling or defense. This is the first evidence for the horizontal transfer of carbohydrate metabolism genes into ectomycorrhizal fungi.


Via Pierre-Marc Delaux
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Great paper from Anne Pringle

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Agroecology, Ecosystems, and Sustainability

We hear a lot about how agriculture affects climate change and other environmental issues, but we hear little about how these issues affect agriculture. When we look at both sides of the issues, we can develop better solutions for sustainable agriculture without adversely affecting the environment. Agroecology, Ecosystems, and Sustainability explores a modern vision of ecology and agricultural systems, so that crop production can be sustainably developed without further environmental degradation. With contributions from experts from more than 20 countries, the book describes how to make the transition to modern agroecology to help the environment. It examines the global availability of natural resources and how agroecology could allow the world population to reach the goal of global sustainable ecological, agricultural, and food production systems. The book discusses important principles that regulate agroecological systems, including crop production, soil management, and environment preservation. Making the link between theory and practices, the book includes examples of agroecology such as an interdisciplinary framework for the management of integrated production and conservation landscapes and the use of mechanized rain-fed farming and its ecological impact on drylands. An examination of how ecology and agriculture can be allied to ensure food production and security without threatening our environment, the text shows you how natural resources can be used in a manner to create a "symbiosis" to preserve ecological systems and develop agriculture.
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Infection by a foliar endophyte elicits novel arabidopside-based plant defence reactions in its host, Cirsium arvense

Infection by a foliar endophyte elicits novel arabidopside-based plant defence reactions in its host, Cirsium arvense | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
Endophytic fungi live asymptomatically within plants. They are usually regarded as nonpathogenic or even mutualistic, but whether plants respond antagonistically to their presence remains unclear, particularly in the little-studied associations between endophytes and nongraminoid herbaceous plants.
We investigated the effects of the endophyte Chaetomium cochlioides on leaf chemistry in Cirsium arvense. Plants were sprayed with spores; leaf material from both subsequent new growth and the sprayed leaves was analysed 2 wk later. Infection frequency was 91% and 63% for sprayed and new growth, respectively, indicating that C. cochlioides rapidly infects new foliage.
Metabolomic analyses revealed marked changes in leaf chemistry with infection, especially in new growth. Changes in several novel oxylipin metabolites were detected, including arabidopsides reported here for the first time in a plant species other than Arabidopsis thaliana, and a jasmonate-containing galactolipid.
The production of these metabolites in response to endophyte presence, particularly in newly infected foliage, suggests that endophytes elicit similar chemical responses in plants to those usually produced following wounding, herbivory and pathogen invasion. Whether endophytes benefit their hosts may depend on a complex series of chemically mediated interactions between the plant, the endophyte, other microbial colonists and natural enemies.
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Cysteine protease and cystatin expression and activity during soybean nodule development and senescence

Nodules play an important role in fixing atmospheric nitrogen for soybean growth. Premature senescence of nodules can negatively impact on nitrogen availability for plant growth and as such we need a better understanding of nodule development and senescence. Cysteine proteases are known to play a role in nodule senescence, but knowledge is still fragmented regarding the function their inhibitors (cystatins) during the development and senescence of soybean nodules. This study provides the first data with regard to cystatin expression during nodule development combined with biochemical characterization of their inhibition strength.ResultsSeventy nine non-redundant cysteine protease gene sequences with homology to papain, belonging to different subfamilies, and several legumain-like cysteine proteases (vacuole processing enzymes) were identified from the soybean genome assembly with eighteen of these cysteine proteases actively transcribed during nodule development and senescence. In addition, nineteen non-redundant cystatins similar to oryzacystatin-I and belonging to cystatin subgroups A and C, were identified from the soybean genome assembly with seven actively transcribed in nodules. Most cystatins had preferential affinity to cathepsin L-like cysteine proteases. Transcription of cystatins Glyma05g28250, Glyma15g12211, Glyma15g36180 particularly increased during onset of senescence, possibly regulating proteolysis when nodules senesce and undergo programmed cell death. Both actively transcribed and non-actively transcribed nodule cystatins inhibited cathepsin-L- and B-like activities in different age nodules and they also inhibited papain and cathepsin-L activity when expressed and purified from bacterial cells.ConclusionsOverlap in activities and specificities of actively and non-actively transcribed cystatins raises the question if non-transcribed cystatins provide a reservoir for response to particular environments. This data might be applicable to the development of strategies to extend the active life span of nodules or prevent environmentally induced senescence.

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Long-term balanced fertilization increases the soil microbial functional diversity in a phosphorus-limited paddy soil

The influence of long-term chemical fertilization on soil microbial communities has been one of the frontier topics of agricultural and environmental sciences and is critical for linking soil microbial flora with soil functions. In this study, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and a functional gene array, GeoChip 4.0, were used to investigate the shifts in microbial composition and functional gene structure in paddy soils with different fertilization treatments over a 22-year period. These included a control without fertilizers, chemical nitrogen fertilizer (N), N and phosphate (NP); N and potassium (NK), and N, P and K (NPK). Based on 16S rRNA gene data, both species evenness and key genera were affected by P fertilization. Functional gene array-based analysis revealed that long-term fertilization significantly changed the overall microbial functional structures. Chemical fertilization significantly increased the diversity and abundance of most genes involved in C, N, P, and S cycling, especially for the treatments NK and NPK. Significant correlations were found among functional gene structure and abundance, related soil enzymatic activities and rice yield, suggesting that a fertilizer-induced shift in the microbial community may accelerate the nutrient turnover in soil, which in turn influenced rice growth. The effect of N fertilization on soil microbial functional genes was mitigated by the addition of P fertilizer in this P-limited paddy soil, suggesting that balanced chemical fertilization is beneficial to the soil microbial community and its functions.
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Role of reactive oxygen species generation and Nod factors during the early symbiotic interaction between bradyrhizobia and peanut, a legume infected by crack entry

Role of reactive oxygen species generation and Nod factors during the early symbiotic interaction between bradyrhizobia and peanut, a legume infected by crack entry | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
Aims
We evaluated whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the plant antioxidant system are involved in the symbiotic interaction between bradyrhizobia and legumes infected by crack entry, without intracellular infection threads (IT) formation, such as Arachis hypogaea L. (peanut). The role of bradyrhizobial Nod factors (NF) in modulating the plants’ oxidative burst was also analysed.

Methods and Results
Histochemical and quantitative procedures were used to detect ROS levels in inoculated and in NF-treated peanut roots. Increase in root H2O2 production was determined at 10 min postinoculation with Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA 6144 or after NF addition. ROS production was modulated by NF. From 15 to 30 min postinoculation, the compatibility of Bradyrhizobium sp.–peanut interaction depends mostly on the H2O2 detoxification via catalase.

Conclusions
We demonstrated for the first time that the early events of the symbiotic interaction in legumes invaded by crack entry trigger an increase in ROS production (represented exclusively by a higher H2O2 content) in which NADPH-oxidase seems not to be involved. NF modulate this response by enhancing the plant antioxidant machinery, contributing to the creation of adequate conditions for symbiosis development.

Significance and Impact of the Study
Our data provide new insights into the mechanism involves in the symbiotic interaction that establish legumes infected by crack entry and suggest that ROS response shows differences compared with legumes invaded by IT formation.
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Partner selection in the mycorrhizal mutualism

Partner selection in the mycorrhizal symbiosis is thought to be a key factor stabilising the mutualism. Both plant hosts and mycorrhizal fungi have been shown to preferentially allocate resources to higher quality partners. This can help maintain underground cooperation, although it is likely that different plant species vary in the spatial precision with which they can select partners. Partner selection in the mycorrhizal symbiosis is presumably context-dependent and can be mediated by factors like (relative) resource abundance and resource fluctuations, competition among mycorrhizas, arrival order and cultivation history. Such factors complicate our current understanding of the importance of partner selection and its effectiveness in stimulating mutualistic cooperation.
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Towards a holistic understanding of the beneficial interactions across the Populus microbiome

Interactions between trees and microorganisms are tremendously complex and the multispecies networks resulting from these associations have consequences for plant growth and productivity. However, a more holistic view is needed to better understand trees as ecosystems and superorganisms, where many interacting species contribute to the overall stability of the system. While much progress has been made on microbial communities associated with individual tree niches and the molecular interactions between model symbiotic partners, there is still a lack of knowledge of the multi-component interactions necessary for holistic ecosystem-level understanding. We review recent studies in Populus to emphasize the importance of such holistic efforts across the leaf, stem and rooting zones, and discuss prospects for future research in these important ecosystems.
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Medicago truncatula Seed Germination

Time lapse of Medicago truncatula (alfalfa) seeds germinating. Two day time lapse, first day not shown. The music is a piano and violin cover of Taylor Swift...
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Live Imaging of Root Hairs

Live Imaging of Root Hairs | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
Root hairs are single cells specialized in the absorption of water and nutrients. Growing root hairs requires intensive cell wall changes to accommodate cell expansion at the apical end by a process known as tip growth. The cell wall of plants is a very rigid structure comprised largely of polysaccharides and hydroxyproline-rich O-glycoproteins. The importance of root hairs stems from their capacity to expand the surface of interaction between the root and the environment, in search for the necessary nutrients and water to allow plant growth. Therefore, it becomes crucial to deepen our knowledge of them, particularly in the light of the applicability in agriculture by allowing the expansion of croplands. Root hair growth is an extremely fast process, reaching growth rates of up to 1 μm/min and it also is a dynamic process; there can be situations in which the final length might not be affected but the growth rate is. Consequently, in this chapter we focus on a method for studying growth dynamics and rates during a time course. This method is versatile allowing for it to be used in other plant organs such as lateral root, hypocotyl, etc., and also in various conditions.
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Host plant quality mediates competition between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

Host plant quality mediates competition between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi exchange soil nutrients for carbon from plant hosts. Empirical works suggests that hosts may selectively provide resources to different fungal species, ultimately affecting fungal competition. However, fungal competition may also be mediated by colonization strategies of the fungi themselves. To test whether host quality drives fungal colonization strategies, we allowed competing fungi access to the roots of plants that varied in quality (manipulated by shading). We used quantitative PCR and microscopy to assess fungal competitive dynamics and found that shaded plants were not left as an open niche for less competitive fungi. However, while competitive fungi outcompeted less competitive fungi, the intensity of this effect depended on the quality of the host, with the strongest differences found on low-quality (shaded) hosts. Our results suggest that environmental conditions for the host aboveground play a role in the competitive interactions among fungi belowground.
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▶ Les mycorhizes - symbiose plante champignon

Un court documentaire sur les enjeux de la mycorhization. Un film de Eric Paul pour la Mission Culture Scientifique de L’Université de Bourgogne.
Sous le terme un peu barbare de mycorhize se cache une réalité très concrète. Comment les racines s'associent-elles à certains champignons dans une symbiose utile à la plante ? Racines bien développées, absorption facilitée de l'eau et des éléments nutritifs, meilleure croissance... Les mycorhizes : pourquoi, comment ?

Via Isabelle Pélissié
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Nice documentary on mycorrhizae... in French.

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Low-energy spectrum of iron–sulfur clusters directly from many-particle quantum mechanics

Low-energy spectrum of iron–sulfur clusters directly from many-particle quantum mechanics | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
Iron–sulfur clusters are a universal biological motif. They carry out electron transfer, redox chemistry and even oxygen sensing, in diverse processes including nitrogen fixation, respiration and photosynthesis. Their low-lying electronic states are key to their remarkable reactivity, but they cannot be directly observed. Here, we present the first ever quantum calculation of the electronic levels of [2Fe–2S] and [4Fe–4S] clusters free from any model assumptions. Our results highlight the limitations of long-standing models of their electronic structure. In particular, we demonstrate that the widely used Heisenberg double exchange model underestimates the number of states by one to two orders of magnitude, which can conclusively be traced to the absence of Fe d d excitations, thought to be important in these clusters. Furthermore, the electronic energy levels of even the same spin are dense on the scale of vibrational fluctuations and this provides a natural explanation for the ubiquity of these clusters in catalysis in nature.
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Endophytic fungi from the genus Colletotrichum are abundant in the Phaseolus vulgaris and have high genetic diversity

Endophytic fungi from the genus Colletotrichum are abundant in the Phaseolus vulgaris and have high genetic diversity | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
Aims
To evaluate the diversity of endophytic fungi from the leaves of the common bean and the genetic diversity of endophytic fungi from the genus Colletrotricum using IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism) analyses.

Methods and Results
The fungi were isolated by tissue fragmentation and identified by analyzing the morphological features and sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the rDNA large subunit (LSU). Twenty-seven different taxa were identified. Colletotrichum was the most commonly isolated genera from the common bean (32.69% and 24.29% of the total isolates from the Ouro Negro and Talismã varieties, respectively). The IRAP and REMAP analyses revealed a high genetic diversity in the Colletotrichum endophytic isolates and were able to discriminate these isolates from the phytopathogen C. lindemuthianum.

Conclusions
Fungi from the genus Colletotrichum are abundant in the Phaseolus vulgaris endophytic community and the IRAP and REMAP markers can be used to rapidly distinguish between C. lindemuthianum and other Colletotrichum members that are frequently found as endophytes.

Significance and Impact of the Study
This is the first report of the diversity of endophytic fungi present in the common bean and the use of IRAP and REMAP markers to assess the genetic diversity of endophytic fungi from the genus Colletotrichum.
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Relationships between phyllosphere bacterial communities and plant functional traits in a neotropical forest

Relationships between phyllosphere bacterial communities and plant functional traits in a neotropical forest | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
The phyllosphere—the aerial surfaces of plants, including leaves—is a ubiquitous global habitat that harbors diverse bacterial communities. Phyllosphere bacterial communities have the potential to influence plant biogeography and ecosystem function through their influence on the fitness and function of their hosts, but the host attributes that drive community assembly in the phyllosphere are poorly understood. In this study we used high-throughput sequencing to quantify bacterial community structure on the leaves of 57 tree species in a neotropical forest in Panama. We tested for relationships between bacterial communities on tree leaves and the functional traits, taxonomy, and phylogeny of their plant hosts. Bacterial communities on tropical tree leaves were diverse; leaves from individual trees were host to more than 400 bacterial taxa. Bacterial communities in the phyllosphere were dominated by a core microbiome of taxa including Actinobacteria, Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteria. Host attributes including plant taxonomic identity, phylogeny, growth and mortality rates, wood density, leaf mass per area, and leaf nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations were correlated with bacterial community structure on leaves. The relative abundances of several bacterial taxa were correlated with suites of host plant traits related to major axes of plant trait variation, including the leaf economics spectrum and the wood density–growth/mortality tradeoff. These correlations between phyllosphere bacterial diversity and host growth, mortality, and function suggest that incorporating information on plant–microbe associations will improve our ability to understand plant functional biogeography and the drivers of variation in plant and ecosystem function.
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The largest living thing on Earth is a humongous fungus

The largest living thing on Earth is a humongous fungus | Plant-Microbe Symbioses | Scoop.it
Forget blue whales and giant redwood trees. The biggest living organism is over 2 miles across, and you'll hardly ever see it
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Fungi are awesome.

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