Plant Microbe Soil Interaction
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Plant Cell Physiol.: Emerging Functions of Nodulin-Like Proteins in Non-Nodulating Plant Species (2014)

Plant Cell Physiol.: Emerging Functions of Nodulin-Like Proteins in Non-Nodulating Plant Species (2014) | Plant Microbe Soil Interaction | Scoop.it

Plant genes whose expression is induced in legumes by Rhizobiumbacteria upon nodulation were initially referred to as nodulins. Several of them play a key role in the establishment of symbiosis. Yet, nodulin-like proteins are also found in non-nodulating plant species such as Arabidopsis, rice, maize or poplar. For instance, 132 are predicted in theArabidopsis thaliana Col-0 genome. Recent studies now highlight the importance of nodulin-like proteins for the transport of nutrients, solutes, amino acids or hormones and for major aspects of plant development. Interestingly, nodulin-like activities at the plant–microbe interface are also important for pathogens to enhance their fitness during host colonization. This work presents a genomic and functional overview of nodulin-like proteins in non-leguminous plant species, with a particular focus on Arabidopsis and rice.

 

Nicolas Denancé, Boris Szurek and Laurent D. Noël

Plant Cell Physiol. (2014) doi:10.1093/pcp/pct198


Via Jean-Michel Ané, Nicolas Denancé
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Rescooped by Abhinav Aeron from Rhizobium Research
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Frontiers in Plant Proteomics: Leveraging Proteomics to Understand Plant–Microbe Interactions (2012)

Frontiers in Plant Proteomics: Leveraging Proteomics to Understand Plant–Microbe Interactions (2012) | Plant Microbe Soil Interaction | Scoop.it

Understanding the interactions of plants with beneficial and pathogenic microbes is a promising avenue to improve crop productivity and agriculture sustainability. Proteomic techniques provide a unique angle to describe these intricate interactions and test hypotheses. The various approaches for proteomic analysis generally include protein/peptide separation and identification, but can also provide quantification and the characterization of post-translational modifications. In this review, we discuss how these techniques have been applied to the study of plant-microbe interactions. We also present some areas where this field of study would benefit from the utilization of newly developed methods that overcome previous limitations. Finally, we reinforce the need for expanding, integrating, and curating protein databases, as well as the benefits of combining protein-level datasets with those from genetic analyses and other high-throughput large-scale approaches for a systems-level view of plant-microbe interactions.

 

Dhileepkumar Jayaraman, Kari L. Forshey, Paul A. Grimsrud and Jean-Michel Ané


Via Nicolas Denancé, IvanOresnik
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